Your Life in the Year 2000

1960s, Donald Silverstein, elizabeth arden, Inspirational Images, space age, woman's mirror

woman's mirror 2000

Photographed by Donald Silverstein.

Make-up by Panchita at Elizabeth Arden. Wig by Clive at Simon Wigs.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Woman’s Mirror, 8th October 1966

Inspirational Images: Clothes in Camera

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Left to right: Herringbone dress  by Quorum, Ansdell Street; Striped dress by Quorum. Large Onyx ring from Palisades. Shoes from Lennards; Three-coloured gaberdine dress by Wallis; Wool jersey dress by John Bates at Jean Varon. Low heeled shoes by Character.

Left to right: Herringbone dress by Quorum, Ansdell Street; Striped dress by Quorum. Large Onyx ring from Palisades. Shoes from Lennards; Three-coloured gaberdine dress by Wallis; Wool jersey dress by John Bates at Jean Varon. Low heeled shoes by Character.

Television is a terrific stimulus to fashion. What Cathy McGowan wears on Ready, Steady, Go! may be in your High Street dress shop a matter of days later in a mass-produced copy. And John Steed’s immaculate Avenger image has played its part in the male peacock revolution. For our television issue here is an ‘outside broadcast’ collection of action clothes.

Produced by Prudence Glynn. Camera by John Beale.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Woman’s Mirror, October 1965.

Pussycat: A John Bates Sizzler

1960s, jean varon, john bates, woman's mirror

John Bates (left) loves short skirts, money, false eyelashes and Cilla Black. Hates English bras, big busts and any sort of foundation garment.

As deliciously opinionated as ever (you have to take him with a big pinch of salt, like so many male designers…), and as promised in my earlier post with the cover, Mr John Bates in Woman’s Mirror, May 1966.

“Women are funny,” he says. “They heave their breasts up and out with tight padded bras and by the time they’ve finished squeezing everything in or pushing it out, they can look quite terrifying when they take their clothes off. Bras should just lightly cup the breast and tights are better than any girdle. Even the lightest suspender belt marks the skin. It’s muscles that matter – women ought to learn to use them properly.”

John, who is 29, created fashion dynamite with his sizzling clothes for Diana Rigg in The Avengers. He believes that skirts are going to get even shorter and that everyone under 40 should be pinning up hems. He says clothes look best on slim girls, but furnishes his flat with curvaceous statues and pictures of rotund Rubenesque beauties. He makes a lot of his own clothes, thinks that hipsters suit both sexes and most sizes, and always wears them himself. He’s now designing shoes, stockings and planning his new collection as well as designing clothes for men.

“And I always design something special for my mother at Christmas. Last year she set her heart on an Avenger op art fur coat. She’s well over 60 and I said, ‘Honestly love, it won’t suit you,’ but she said, ‘What’s good enough for Diana Rigg is good enough for me.’

“Usually I don’t listen to anybody. I’ve had my years of being told what to do. Now I don’t accept advice from anybody.”

Born in Newcastle, the son of a miner, John started at the bottom. “I’m no art school protégé. I picked up pins, embroidered, did the cleaning and had every rotten job that was going flung at me. I came to London because it’s the only place to work in the rag trade. I got on the train with a Newcastle accent and when I got off at London I’d lost it. I spoke very slowly for a long time, but it’s really the only way to do it.”

And joy! The magazine’s owner never sent off for the dress (which is sad), but this means that the form is still in tact (which is rather fabulous). Now where’s that time-travelling postbox I keep requesting?

Snoopin’ on Bates and Rigg

1960s, brighton, diana rigg, emma peel, jean varon, john bates, snooper's paradise, woman's mirror

Years ago, in my hardcore Diana Rigg-memorabilia-collecting phase, I noticed and coveted a copy of Woman’s Mirror from 1966 with La Rigg on the front cover. I’ve only seen it this one time, on eBay, and it went way out of my price range. And considering I paid £30 for the Sunday Times magazine which featured John Bates’s designs for Diana, it must have been very steep for me to have not won it.

I mentioned it to Mr Brownwindsor a few weeks back, for some reason I can’t recall. I say mentioned, it may have been more like a moan. Wahhhh, poor me, I want this magazine, blah blah. The only difference now was that I am considerably more interested in the John Bates article it contains, than the Rigg one!

A few days after this, he mentioned having seen some copies of Woman’s Mirror in Snooper’s Paradise in Brighton. Spooky! No sign of the coveted issue (what would be the chances?) but definitely worth having a look in case there might be other interesting articles. So we mooched along on the Bank Holiday Monday. Had a look at some other issues of Woman’s Mirror, Woman’s Realm, Woman, Women!, Womanly, Women’s Troubles….etc etc. Then M noticed there were some more magazines in a glass cabinet. I look up, and there it is. Diana Rigg, with cut-out dotted line. THE issue. All other issues had been £3, surely this would be much more. But no. £3 it was.

I am a very happy lady, and I will be scanning/writing up the John Bates interview in due course.