Emilio Pucci at Fortnum & Mason

1960s, fortnum and mason, Pucci, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Scanned from Vogue, December 1968.

Come Clean

19 magazine, 1960s, interior design, interiors
This special 19 bathroom was planned on a budget of £200, which includes all the fixtures and the plumbing. Designed by Igal Yawetz, Dip. Arch. Ham. I.E.A.I. and built by Allied Ironfounders Ltd.

Own up! Do you really spend enough time in your bathroom?

We hate to admit it but bath-time in Britain is generally regarded as a dreary, unnecessary drudge! Maybe unpleasant memories of exasperated mum dragging us bodily up the stairs and scrubbing off sand, chocolate, grease and the like, have something to do with it, but we want, to prove that bathing can be lots of fun. Start by thinking of your bathroom as something more than just a box with a bath, somewhere at the back of your house. Think of it as a welcoming, comfortable room filled with glorious beauty products and your favourite luxuries; a place where you can hide from the family and white away many hours relaxing, reading and preening yourself after a busy, demanding, harassed day.

Photographer uncredited.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, November 1968.

John Bates

1960s, avengers, avengerswear, David Gittings, diana rigg, emma peel, Inspirational Images, jean varon, john bates, norman eales, Rolf van Brandtzage, the avengers
Scanned from Woman’s Mirror October 30th 1965. Photographed by Norman Eales.

If you follow me on Instagram, you will already have read my tribute to the amazing John Bates, who died on the 5th of June aged 83. Here I have collated a few images of his work designing costumes for Diana Rigg as Emma Peel in her first season in The Avengers, and an accompanying article from Woman’s Mirror, October 1965. I have also updated an earlier post with clearer scans from Woman’s Mirror, May 1966 of a dress which wasn’t officially Avengerswear but being offered as a pattern for readers with a cover photo of Diana in the dress.

“WHEN people say, ‘Oh, she’s the new Avengers girl’ I know that’s not all I am,” says 27-year-old Diana Rigg. “I had a career in the theatre before this and I know I can always go back to it. I hate talking about The Avengers and what I’m like in it and how I differ from Honor Blackman. I would much rather people drew their own conclusions.

“I dread the prospect of all the attachments to being famous. I work here at the studios from seven in the morning until six at night and I feel that should be enough. The thought of being a public personality, opening shops, and not being able to answer the door in my curlers, horrifies me.”

But being the Avengers girl has its advantages. Not the least of them being the prospect of wearing a sizz-ling new wardrobe, designed specially for the series by John Bates of Jean Varon.

“John’s been absolutely smashing,” says Diana. “Like most actresses, I spend a lot of time studying myself for the stage, and so off-stage I tend to the casual. I really have no set ideas about clothes. First of all, John studied my figure, discovered my faults, used them, and made a virtue out of them.

“He’s emphasised my broad shoulders with cutaway necklines. He’s drawn attention to my big hips with hipsters and huge broad belts. I think that this is a far more realistic attitude than designing for some impossible ideal model figure.

“There’s a kind of swinginess about John’s clothes which really makes me move in a special kind of way. And they’re all interchangeable. In different episodes there will be different permutations of the same clothes and ideally, of course, this is just how a woman’s wardrobe should be.

In deference to the American market, which still thinks that leather is the sexiest thing out, Diana has one leather fighting suit. “Of course, leather isn’t sexy at all,” she says, “It’s far too rigid. My other fighting suit is in black, clingy jersey which is far sexier.”

Clingy jersey fighting suits are all very well, but they have to stand up to pretty stiff competition in the shape of some snazzy interchangeables.

In this week’s instalment set in a gloomy Scottish castle, Diana will wear ice-blue lace ensemble with ankle boots, hipster trousers, bare midriff, bra top and modesty jacket. For exploring dungeon and torture chambers, flesh lace catsuit under white chiffon negligee.

There’s no doubt about it. If the clothes are anything to go by, this ABC series of The Avengers is certainly living up to the boast of its associate producer . . “It’s still a kinky show.”

Scanned from John Bates: Fashion Designer by Richard Lester.
Scanned from Television Stars Annual.
Scanned from Woman’s Mirror, 28th May 1966. Photographed by Rolf van Brandtzage.
Scanned from John Bates: Fashion Designer by Richard Lester. Photogrphed by David Gittings.
Scanned from Fashion in the 60s by Barbara Bernard.
Scanned from John Bates: Fashion Designer by Richard Lester. Photogrphed by David Gittings.
Scanned from Fashion in the 60s by Barbara Bernard.
Photographed by David Gittings. Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, September 26th 1965.
Scanned from Woman’s Mirror October 30th 1965.

Pussycat… a John Bates Sizzler

1960s, diana rigg, Donald Silverstein, jean varon, john bates, John Carter, woman's mirror
Even Diana Rigg was knocked out by this John Bates cut-out dress.

(This post was originally from 2011. I have updated it with better quality scans.)

John Bates loves short skirts, money, false eyelashes and Cilla Black. Hates English bras, big busts and any sort of foundation garment.

“Women are funny,” he says. “They heave their breasts up and out with tight padded bras and by the time they’ve finished squeezing everything in or pushing it out, they can look quite terrifying when they take their clothes off. Bras should just lightly cup the breast and tights are better than any girdle. Even the lightest suspender belt marks the skin. It’s muscles that matter – women ought to learn to use them properly.”

John, who is 29, created fashion dynamite with his sizzling clothes for Diana Rigg in The Avengers. He believes that skirts are going to get even shorter and that everyone under 40 should be pinning up hems. He says clothes look best on slim girls, but furnishes his flat with curvaceous statues and pictures of rotund Rubenesque beauties. He makes a lot of his own clothes, thinks that hipsters suit both sexes and most sizes, and always wears them himself. He’s now designing shoes, stockings and planning his new collection as well as designing clothes for men.

“And I always design something special for my mother at Christmas. Last year she set her heart on an Avenger op art fur coat. She’s well over 60 and I said, ‘Honestly love, it won’t suit you,’ but she said, ‘What’s good enough for Diana Rigg is good enough for me.’

“Usually I don’t listen to anybody. I’ve had my years of being told what to do. Now I don’t accept advice from anybody.”

Born in Newcastle, the son of a miner, John started at the bottom. “I’m no art school protégé. I picked up pins, embroidered, did the cleaning and had every rotten job that was going flung at me. I came to London because it’s the only place to work in the rag trade. I got on the train with a Newcastle accent and when I got off at London I’d lost it. I spoke very slowly for a long time, but it’s really the only way to do it.”

John Bates and model photogrphed by John Carter.

Diana Rigg cover photographed by Don Silverstein.

Scanned from Woman’s Mirror, 28th May 1966.

And joy! The magazine’s owner never sent off for the dress (which is sad), but this means that the form is still in tact (which is rather fabulous). Now where’s that time-travelling postbox I keep requesting?

Film Fashion

1960s, Chelsea Antiques Market, Deco Inspired, edward mann, Gay Girl, Ginger Group, Inspirational Images, john stephen, Laurence Sackman, mary quant, Morel, petticoat magazine, Rodger Bass, Roger Nelson, Seventh Avenue, Sue Hone, The Westerner, Vintage Editorials

CAMELOT

White dress from a selection at the Antique Supermarket, Kings Road London. Seventh Avenue dress with pointed sleeves, 7½ gns. Paul Stephens twisted rings, 4s.

Props by Miss Joanna Brett.

Fashion by Susan Hone.

Photographed by Laurence Sackman.

Scanned from Petticoat, January 20th 1968.

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE

Roger Nelson floral dress, 8½ gns. John Hamilton wooden beads ,10s. 6d. / Mary Quant Ginger Group green crepe dress trimmed with yellow, £7 19s. 6d. (This dress will not be in the shops until March).

BONNIE AND CLYDE

John Stephen brown gangster hat, 45s. Spotted tie from a selection at Solid Gold, 15s. 6d. Mary Quant beret, 12s. 6d. Gay Girl yellow crepe maxi-skirt and top, 6½gns. & Gay Girl by Marion Maid pin striped trouser suit, £7 19s. 6d. Car lent by David Chester.

GONE WITH THE WIND

Edward Mann straw hat, 45s. 11d. Raymond velvet cape, 17gns. Rodger Bass “Long Snow Queen” dress, 8gns. Youngs Dress Hire white dress and matching hat, 12gns to hire. Andrew Stewart pink fringed shawl.

BLUE

Cowboy hat, £7 17s. 6d., shirts, 79s. 6d., squaw set, 19gns., suede jerkin, 5gns., and trousers at 19gns. from Westerner, 469 Oxford Street. Morel of London riding chaps £10 5s., jerkin 8½gns. Photographed at Lester School of Equitation, Roehampton.

The Romantic Phenomenon

1960s, celia hammond, david bailey, jean muir, leonard

How to have the best of all worlds at once, and be romantically different, dashing and gentle, nostalgic and modern. Never seen before in a contemporary context, the look, above, that is the key to so much that’s arriving in the first few months of the year: the billowy bodice brimming over with collar, the gathered shoulders letting fall sleeves as eloquent as Hamlet’s. Cinch the waist with what used to be a belt, what now can be pearls or bone or Plexi-glass, or soft wrapping cummerbunds as here. All in saffron silk crepe rippling into a richly pleated maxi-length skirt. By Jean Muir, £47 19s. 6d, from the 31 Shop at Harvey Nichols. Gentle glossy hair, waved and caught by a slide of pale coloured pearls, by Leonard. Dreamy Germaine Monteil make-up, by Gordon at Leonard.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Vogue, January 1968.

For the Discotheque

1960s, beauty, hair, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, paul misso, petticoat magazine, Piero de Monzi

When you go to a nightclub – don’t look nice! Nice means safe make-up, a little eyeshadow and ordinary hair. That’s the best way to get lost when you should be turning every head.

Go wild, wear crazy colours – cause a sensation whatever you do, don’t play safe. Looking so sensational, you’re going to be dancing a lot, so be sure of your cool. Have a crazy bath with the water coloured blue with Weil’s Antilope Bain de Mousse, £1.10s. Deodorise from top to toe with Arrid’s anti perspirant for underarms, 4s.6d. which you wisely defuzzed the night before, and use Bidex vaginal deodorant spray, 8s.11d. Give feet a treat with Windsor Gold Foot Freshener, 18s.6d.

Then wear lashings of cologne and matching talc touch of the exotics with Kiku’s Talc Ball £1.7s. 6d. and After Bath Cologne, £2.9s.6d. by Faberge.

Jayne’s wig comes from Leonards and it really stopped the traffic. Her foundation is Rubinstein’s Illumination Souffle Stick £2.7s.6d., then a polished glow with a few deft slicks of Vanilla Souffle stick £2.7s.6d. On her eyes—Lumina Silver Cake Eyeshadow, 35s. by Rubinstein, Gala’s Iced Mauve Matte Shadow 7s.9d., in the socket line. Pale mauve real feather lashes by Piero de Monzi, £3.13s.6d., top lashes 18s.6d., by Cardinelli. Mauve eyeshadow painted on lips or Cydax Apricot Gold Colour Creme Lipstick, 14s.6d. Kiku perfume stick, £2.17s.6d. for bosom, behind ears, wrists and back of knees. Give nails crystal lights with one of Cutex’s new exciting colours like Zircon Glaze, 5s.3d. Soften hands with Rubinstein’s Hand Delight. 16s.

Clothes from Fenwick. Golden Disc and Sidney Smith.

Beauty by Ann Morrow.

Photographed by Paul Misso.

Scanned from Petticoat, 8th November 1969.

Ski on a New Clash Course of Colour

1960s, Barney Wan, fortnum and mason, Harrods, Illustrations, Jaeger, Lillywhites, Lyle and Scott, oliver goldsmith, Simone Mirman, Simpson of Piccadilly, V de V, Vogue
Instant orange action, near right. Supple stretch nylon ski suit with small jacket, stiff stitched collar and cuffs, silver zippy slanted pockets, flat metal buckle on the belt. By Hauser Sport, 51 gns, at Simpson. White framed face fitting goggles, by Oliver Goldsmith, 6 gns, from Fortnum & Mason. Red fox fur mittens, 41 gns, at Lillywhites. Wasp yellow battle jacket, far right, with waspish black stripes and black poppers, stinging silver zips. By V de V, about 25 gns. Lean stretchy black pants, by Daks, £12 10s. Both at Simpson. Black leather mittens, £3 10s, from a selection at Harrods.

Looks like a brilliant band of dragonflies speeding down the mountain. Looks where the ac-tion is. And how. With shapes very shapely, military and zippy. Fabrics super stretchy, quilted and warm.

In honour of the late, great Barney Wan, art editor and illustrator at Vogue in the Sixties and Seventies who sadly died last week, here is a superb editorial on ski fashions illustrated by the man himself. There is something so ahead of its time about the combination of these illustrations and the layout.

Illustrations by Barney Wan.

Scanned from Vogue, November 1967.

Gadflying green streak of quilted nylon, left. Zipped all in one stretch boiler suit with white stripes circling waist and arm. By V de V, 29 gns, at Harrods. Honey fox hood, 13i gns (in several colours), at Lillywhites. Stunning stretch catsuit of orange Helanca, centre. Racy zip, little military epaulets and buckled belt; 21 gns. Matching trapper’s hat lined in fox; 14 gns. Both at Fortnum & Mason. Sun striped cashmere sweater, by Lyle & Scott, 8 gns, at Harrods. Long fast flickering stretch of quilted nylon, right. Vibrant coloured jacket, matching trousers (not shown). Bognor of Germany, about 41 gns, at Harrods. Space flying helmet with built-in Perspex shield, at Simone Mirman.
Fitted flame of quilted stretch nylon, left, orange and yellow print jacket; 18 gns. Bright yellow bell bottom trousers with buckled band; 13 gns. Both from Jaeger, Regent St. Goggles by Oliver Goldsmith, 6 gns, Fortnum & Mason. Boots, 14 gns, in a range from £10 to £25, at Pindisports.
Nifty new looks on a background of snowbound nostalgia. Quick quilted stretch jacket, left, orange, aubergine, mauve and green. With hood to match, £20 10s. Aubergine trousers, from £5 19s. 6d. Skin-tight prototype super stretch suit, near right, racily made for the men in the British Olympic team. By Harris Meyer, to order. All at Pindisports. Mauve mini suit, centre right, snow shadow shade. Seamed battle jacket with plenty of poppers, mini skirt un-zipped to more than mini culottes. In Helanca and worsted, 22 gns. Sugar pink ribbed sweater and tights, 15 gns, to order. Pink fox hood, 13; gns. All at Lillywhites. Snow bound charcoal flannel suit, far right, Tyrolean type. Flared jacket, pretty I plain knickerbockers, and cap. White rib stockings and sweater too. By Scan Style, 40 gns, Simpson.
Brisk berry red quilted jerkin and knickerbockers, top right. Quilting in cunning chevron shape and jerkin with a speedy shiny zip up the front. By Scan Style, 13 gns, at Simpson. Jazzy canary yellow culotte dress, top left. Pretty neat in nylon with a huge fox hood and big zip. By White Stag, 171 gns, at Harrods. Skinny black balaclava and tights. 7 gns, 16s. 11d, at Harrods. Bright sun yellow nylon anorak, above right, in sleek shirt shape. 151 gns. Matching Lycra and worsted ski trousers. 181 gns. And a snow powder blue sweater with sections in cable stitch. 111 gns. All three by Ernst Engel at Lillywhites.
Streamlined stretchy black nylon anorak, top right. And a pretty nifty pair of black and white plaid knickerbockers, with little gilt buckles gripping the knee cuffs. 16 gns, 14 gns, at Gordon Lowes, Sloane St. Clean limbed crisp flannel knickerbocker suit, above left. Sharply squared charcoal jerkin with broad white flannel border, white flannel cuffs. And trim white knickerbockers fast-ened with fetching gilt hinges at the knee. By Scan Style, 30 gns, at Simpson.

Spectacular

1960s, amanda lear, corocraft, gala, kari ann muller, Sunglasses, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Spectacular is certainly how I would describe this triumvirate of iconic models: Gala Mitchell, Kari-Ann Muller and Amanda Lear.

Scanned from Vogue, December 1968.

Thirties lips are Here’n Now

19 magazine, 1960s, Deco Inspired, Hair and make-up, hand tinting, Lentheric, Make-up, Vintage Adverts
Lentheric cosmetics advert
“Only Lentheric have it. Here ‘n Now Red. The today way of saying the Thirties. Memorably.”

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1968.