For the Discotheque

1960s, beauty, hair, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, paul misso, petticoat magazine, Piero de Monzi

When you go to a nightclub – don’t look nice! Nice means safe make-up, a little eyeshadow and ordinary hair. That’s the best way to get lost when you should be turning every head.

Go wild, wear crazy colours – cause a sensation whatever you do, don’t play safe. Looking so sensational, you’re going to be dancing a lot, so be sure of your cool. Have a crazy bath with the water coloured blue with Weil’s Antilope Bain de Mousse, £1.10s. Deodorise from top to toe with Arrid’s anti perspirant for underarms, 4s.6d. which you wisely defuzzed the night before, and use Bidex vaginal deodorant spray, 8s.11d. Give feet a treat with Windsor Gold Foot Freshener, 18s.6d.

Then wear lashings of cologne and matching talc touch of the exotics with Kiku’s Talc Ball £1.7s. 6d. and After Bath Cologne, £2.9s.6d. by Faberge.

Jayne’s wig comes from Leonards and it really stopped the traffic. Her foundation is Rubinstein’s Illumination Souffle Stick £2.7s.6d., then a polished glow with a few deft slicks of Vanilla Souffle stick £2.7s.6d. On her eyes—Lumina Silver Cake Eyeshadow, 35s. by Rubinstein, Gala’s Iced Mauve Matte Shadow 7s.9d., in the socket line. Pale mauve real feather lashes by Piero de Monzi, £3.13s.6d., top lashes 18s.6d., by Cardinelli. Mauve eyeshadow painted on lips or Cydax Apricot Gold Colour Creme Lipstick, 14s.6d. Kiku perfume stick, £2.17s.6d. for bosom, behind ears, wrists and back of knees. Give nails crystal lights with one of Cutex’s new exciting colours like Zircon Glaze, 5s.3d. Soften hands with Rubinstein’s Hand Delight. 16s.

Clothes from Fenwick. Golden Disc and Sidney Smith.

Beauty by Ann Morrow.

Photographed by Paul Misso.

Scanned from Petticoat, 8th November 1969.

Ski on a New Clash Course of Colour

1960s, Barney Wan, fortnum and mason, Harrods, Illustrations, Jaeger, Lillywhites, Lyle and Scott, oliver goldsmith, Simone Mirman, Simpson of Piccadilly, V de V, Vogue
Instant orange action, near right. Supple stretch nylon ski suit with small jacket, stiff stitched collar and cuffs, silver zippy slanted pockets, flat metal buckle on the belt. By Hauser Sport, 51 gns, at Simpson. White framed face fitting goggles, by Oliver Goldsmith, 6 gns, from Fortnum & Mason. Red fox fur mittens, 41 gns, at Lillywhites. Wasp yellow battle jacket, far right, with waspish black stripes and black poppers, stinging silver zips. By V de V, about 25 gns. Lean stretchy black pants, by Daks, £12 10s. Both at Simpson. Black leather mittens, £3 10s, from a selection at Harrods.

Looks like a brilliant band of dragonflies speeding down the mountain. Looks where the ac-tion is. And how. With shapes very shapely, military and zippy. Fabrics super stretchy, quilted and warm.

In honour of the late, great Barney Wan, art editor and illustrator at Vogue in the Sixties and Seventies who sadly died last week, here is a superb editorial on ski fashions illustrated by the man himself. There is something so ahead of its time about the combination of these illustrations and the layout.

Illustrations by Barney Wan.

Scanned from Vogue, November 1967.

Gadflying green streak of quilted nylon, left. Zipped all in one stretch boiler suit with white stripes circling waist and arm. By V de V, 29 gns, at Harrods. Honey fox hood, 13i gns (in several colours), at Lillywhites. Stunning stretch catsuit of orange Helanca, centre. Racy zip, little military epaulets and buckled belt; 21 gns. Matching trapper’s hat lined in fox; 14 gns. Both at Fortnum & Mason. Sun striped cashmere sweater, by Lyle & Scott, 8 gns, at Harrods. Long fast flickering stretch of quilted nylon, right. Vibrant coloured jacket, matching trousers (not shown). Bognor of Germany, about 41 gns, at Harrods. Space flying helmet with built-in Perspex shield, at Simone Mirman.
Fitted flame of quilted stretch nylon, left, orange and yellow print jacket; 18 gns. Bright yellow bell bottom trousers with buckled band; 13 gns. Both from Jaeger, Regent St. Goggles by Oliver Goldsmith, 6 gns, Fortnum & Mason. Boots, 14 gns, in a range from £10 to £25, at Pindisports.
Nifty new looks on a background of snowbound nostalgia. Quick quilted stretch jacket, left, orange, aubergine, mauve and green. With hood to match, £20 10s. Aubergine trousers, from £5 19s. 6d. Skin-tight prototype super stretch suit, near right, racily made for the men in the British Olympic team. By Harris Meyer, to order. All at Pindisports. Mauve mini suit, centre right, snow shadow shade. Seamed battle jacket with plenty of poppers, mini skirt un-zipped to more than mini culottes. In Helanca and worsted, 22 gns. Sugar pink ribbed sweater and tights, 15 gns, to order. Pink fox hood, 13; gns. All at Lillywhites. Snow bound charcoal flannel suit, far right, Tyrolean type. Flared jacket, pretty I plain knickerbockers, and cap. White rib stockings and sweater too. By Scan Style, 40 gns, Simpson.
Brisk berry red quilted jerkin and knickerbockers, top right. Quilting in cunning chevron shape and jerkin with a speedy shiny zip up the front. By Scan Style, 13 gns, at Simpson. Jazzy canary yellow culotte dress, top left. Pretty neat in nylon with a huge fox hood and big zip. By White Stag, 171 gns, at Harrods. Skinny black balaclava and tights. 7 gns, 16s. 11d, at Harrods. Bright sun yellow nylon anorak, above right, in sleek shirt shape. 151 gns. Matching Lycra and worsted ski trousers. 181 gns. And a snow powder blue sweater with sections in cable stitch. 111 gns. All three by Ernst Engel at Lillywhites.
Streamlined stretchy black nylon anorak, top right. And a pretty nifty pair of black and white plaid knickerbockers, with little gilt buckles gripping the knee cuffs. 16 gns, 14 gns, at Gordon Lowes, Sloane St. Clean limbed crisp flannel knickerbocker suit, above left. Sharply squared charcoal jerkin with broad white flannel border, white flannel cuffs. And trim white knickerbockers fast-ened with fetching gilt hinges at the knee. By Scan Style, 30 gns, at Simpson.

Spectacular

1960s, amanda lear, corocraft, gala, kari ann muller, Sunglasses, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Spectacular is certainly how I would describe this triumvirate of iconic models: Gala Mitchell, Kari-Ann Muller and Amanda Lear.

Scanned from Vogue, December 1968.

Thirties lips are Here’n Now

19 magazine, 1960s, Deco Inspired, Hair and make-up, hand tinting, Lentheric, Make-up, Vintage Adverts
Lentheric cosmetics advert
“Only Lentheric have it. Here ‘n Now Red. The today way of saying the Thirties. Memorably.”

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1968.

Get Away

1960s, Gershon, Inspirational Images, Otto Lucas, Simon Ellis, vanity fair

For a Sunday by the river . . . just looking your prettiest. Snowy-white dress in broderie Anglais with a wide, square neckline, puff sleeves -a very demure air about it. By Simon Ellis, 72gns. Wide-brimmed hat in fine white straw by Otto Lucas, 88s. White organza parasol, to order from Harrods, 6 2 gns. White tights by Mary Quant, 18s : 11d. Paisley cushions and old-fashioned quilt from Cornucopia. More prettiness how-to : Almay’s range of hypo-allergenic make-up, specially formulated for difficult skins that usually don’t like any make-up at all. Soft Ivory Liquid Make-up, matching powder. Eye Shadow Aqua, Charcoal Brown Mascara; Pink Pecan Colour Moist Lipstick, And, a summertime scent, Mademoiselle Ricci by Nina Ricci.

Photographed by Gershon

Scanned from Vanity Fair, July 1968.

The Renaissance of Elegance

1960s, cherry twiss, florence, Inspirational Images, italy, ken scott, Pucci, Robert Freson, telegraph magazine, The Sunday Telegraph Magazine, Vintage Editorials
Ognibene-Zendman: silk culotte pyjamas, in the Palazzo Orsini, Rome.

Paris in recent seasons has seemed to be more interested in the line of a dress than whether it enhances the body. So Weekend Telegraph turned to Rome and Florence, where the emphasis is still on elegance and femininity, to report on this year’s Spring and Summer Collections.

Fashion by Cherry Twiss.

Photographed by Robert Freson.

Scanned from The Weekend Telegraph Magazine, February 24th 1967.

Ken Scott: matching floral prints, in the Villa Ombrellino, Florence.
Pucci: chiffon tent, crepe trousers, Villa Ombrellino.
Mila Schön: beaded tube, in the Villa Lante, Bagnaia.
Forquet: lace poncho over jewelled leggings, in the Palazzo Orsini.
Barocco: laminated silk tunic dress, in the Palazzo Orsini.

You can take a White Horse anywhere.

1960s, menswear, observer magazine, Vintage Adverts

Make mine a double and I’ll take the green jacket on the left as well please!

Advert for White Horse whiskey.

Scanned from The Observer Magazine, 20th April 1969.

A python in her room

1960s, 1970s, Art Kane, Inspirational Images, Margrit Ramme, Queen magazine, thea porter

“You love your boyfriend and he’s left you. You’re alone in a big city and an empty apartment.” Kane had not yet picked up his camera, but Margrit Ramme was working on the sadness. She was also scared of the snake. The editors of Queen magazine had asked for an entire issue to be called “Art Kane’s New York,” including fashions, and he had said all right—but don’t expect to see laughing girls running down Fifth Avenue. He had just divorced his second wife, had not yet met Jean Pagliuso or photographed Larry Rivers, and felt fairly bitter.

If you want to call it Art Kane’s New York, he told Queen, you’ll have to accept pictures showing that the place right now is kind of empty for me. Righto, they said.

He left the studio and rummaged around for real-life locations. He had found the apartment on Gramercy Park, and decided to shoot the fashions there before the furniture came in. Truth is, he wasn’t motivated entirely by a desire to display his mood. Not only does training as an art director make him look for a theme when he has space for an essay, as against a bunch of random shots that just present the merchandise; Art Kane loves almost more than anything else to tell a story.

He also loves snakes. The first boy scout in the Bronx to get a Reptile Study merit badge, he kept 32 of them at home despite a mother who tried to make him flush the first one down the toilet.

This story would reflect the dilemma of a lovely woman—always beautifully dressed, of course—searching for a man, for identity, for something. A snake would be not only an obvious male symbol but also a reminder of a Garden of Eden to start it off. Since Kane had given, his collection to the Bronx Zoo when he was drafted, he called All-Tame Animals, a pro-vider of non-human performers in New York. They referred him to a snake owner in one of the city’s residential hotels, asking that he be discreet; she would be evicted if the manage-ment discovered that she kept a boa constrictor and a python in her room. So Kane was Uncle Joe when he called to ask about Cousin Bea: “She must be a really big girl by now. Oh, six feet six, that sounds good.” And Patricia? “Over eight feet tall? My goodness.” He went over to see them. Their owner showed him the boa in her bathtub and pulled the python out of a closet. “Terrific,” he said. “Bring them up to my place at 10 o’clock tomorrow.”

When she arrived with the snakes in a laundry bag, Kane was moving white window shades up and down, studying the way they filtered the natural light he would use all day. Morning light came softly through the west-facing windows of the living room. He arranged the python, then stood back to peer through a Nikon. Moving forward, back, left, right, he kept the model close to the center of the frame. He was using a 24mm lens, not only for depth of field that would keep the picture sharp from front to back but also to make objects near the edges seem to lean away, focusing attention on the center.

“Okay, Margrit, you’re unhappy, unaware, the two of you can never really come together. . . .” Bracketing—one shot at a normal exposure, one above, one below—he redesigned the picture as he moved. “That’s it, keep it, keep it,” he told her when he liked what was happening. “Now, hold every pose for three clicks and then change … Beautiful. Now keep that until I say stop. I want to explore this until we’ve eaten it up.”

Ninety minutes later he had eaten up the male-female situation (above) and moved to the bedroom (below) to set up an identity problem. A second model had arrived. “You’re clothed and you’re naked,” Kane said, “you’re really the same woman, trying to figure out who you are.” This time he wanted to stretch the image more alarmingly toward the edges, so he put on the 21mm lens that he had used to shock the editors of Vogue on his first fashion assignment.

Images originally published in Queen magazine .

(date not given but looks circa 1969/70 to me, especially given Queen merged with Harpers Bazaar in 1970).

Clothes are uncredited here but both look like Thea Porter to me.

Photographed by Art Kane.

Scanned from Art Kane: The Persuasive Image, 1975.

Victoria Tennant (and Afghan)

1960s, british boutique movement, Kenneth Vard, patrick lichfield, Victoria Tennant, Vogue

Victoria Tennant, an Afghan hound and a jacket of real patent leather, caramel brown and shiny. She is a drama student at the Central School. The jacket, 39 gns, was made with wide lapels and a belt, by a new boutique, Kenneth Vard, 90 Marylebone High Street, W.1, who makes anything in any colour and any suede or leather.

Photographed by Patrick Lichfield.

Scanned from Vogue, May 1969.

The Cover Up Look for Spring

1960s, Harpers Bazaar, Inspirational Images, Sarah Moon, yves saint laurent
The cover up look for Spring by Yves Saint Laurent (fabrics by Abraham, Brossin de Mere) in a multi coloured rainbow skirt that sweeps the floor.

Happy International Women’s Day! Here is one of my favourite covers, from the glorious Harpers Bazaar (before they merged with Queen and lost this lovely deco typeface, that 5s makes me swoon for some reason) and by one of my favourite photographers, Sarah Moon.

Photographed by Sarah Moon.

Scanned from Harpers Bazaar, April 1969.