Serge Lutens

1970s, christian dior, Hair and make-up, harpers and queen, Make-up, Serge Lutens
Romanticism is the keynote of the new Dior look for autumn ’74, as created by Serge Lutens. All by Dior of course.

Photographed by Serge Lutens.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, September 1974.

You’ve never blushed like this before

19 magazine, 1970s, Hair and make-up, Make-up, Vintage Adverts
Advert for Natural Wonder ‘Soft Blush’.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1973.

The Vamp’s Back

1970s, Anne Tyrrell, barbara hulanicki, biba, chelsea cobbler, Derber, Fortuna, gillian richard, just looking, Marcia Brackett, mary quant, mr freedom, nostalgia, petticoat magazine, Sacha, Spectrum, terry de havilland
There’s a party in the air—just getting in the mood? Green satin, long dress, Biba, Kensington High. Street, W8, £9.40. Lace gloves from a selection at Nostalgia, 29 Bedfordbury, New Row WC2, Bracelets from Emeline, SW3. Sparkle beads by Adrien Mann. Perspex shoes by Terry de Havilland, £15 from Derber Shops.

For much too long now, “dressing up” to go out has been looked upon as simply too uncool for words. Being chic meant arriving at a party in the clothes you got up in that morning and heaven help a girl who attempted anything more extravagant than a lurex halter top and trousers. This year the festive season takes its revenge – and with a vengeance! There is room for all the glamour you can muster and then some. It’s time for every girl to discover her own specially good assets, be it a neat pair of legs, smooth shoulders or an uplifting bust, and then show them off in shimmering satin, coolest crepe n’ dazzling decoration.

Pictures taken at Lindos, Rhodes, where Petticoat’s fashion and beauty team stayed by courtesy of Cosmopolitan Holidays Ltd., 296, Regent Street, W1.

Hair by Christine at Mane Line.

Fashion by Marcia Brackett.

Photographed by Fortuna.

Scanned from Petticoat Magazine, 1st December 1973.

A girl knows how to get things going…Long-sleeved, V-neck dress with ruched bodice, by Anne Tyrell for John Marks, £20.95, Wallis Shops. Feather boa, £8.95, at Just Looking, SW3. Bangles from Emeline, SW3. Sparkle beads at Way In, S W1, £1-85. Black sparkly shoes, Terry de Havilland, £15.

And how to cool it down . . Sleeveless dress with ruched front and diamante trim at Spectrum, 70 Gloucester Road,SW7, £29.50. Silver stud earrings, Paul Stephens. Silver poppet beads, Way In, SWI. Silver shoes, Chelsea Cobbler.

Even going home in the small hours can be romantic …Swirl skirt dress with gold lurex relief by Mary Quant, £28, at Bourne and Hollingsworth, W1. Feather boa from Mr. Freedom, SW3, £8-85. Chiffon scarf, “208”, SW10. Beaded purse from Nostalgia, 29 Bedfordbury, WC2. Gold snakeskin shoes by Terry de Havilland for Sacha, £9.99.

Two of the nicest escorts any girl could find . . Black and silver striped lurex vest dress with matching jacket, £12.90, by Gillian Richard at all branches of Miss Selfridge.

Mary gives men ideas

1970s, cosmopolitan, david bailey, Hair and make-up, Make-up, mary quant, vidal sassoon, Vintage Adverts
Advert for Mary Quant make-up and Havoc perfume.

Hair by Vidal Sassoon.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, December 1979.

Soft and Pretty

1970s, biba, clobber, David Finch, Dolcis, Feathers, gillian richard, Inspirational Images, petticoat magazine, Pourelle, ravel, Rosie Nice, Sacha, Sue Hone, Vintage Editorials
Gillian Richard dress, £17.10s., Miss Selfridge, W.1. Biba tights, 10s.6d. Biba choker, £1.2s. Ravel shoes, £6.19s. 11d.

Softly, softly, ever so gently, it’s velvet— printed! It’s as pretty as a picture—so cling to it

Styling by Sue Hone.

Photographed by David Finch.

Scanned from Petticoat Magazine, 3rd October 1970.

Pourelle midi with laced-front jacket, 131.10s., Fifth Avenue shops, Quant tights, 15s.11d. Biba butterfly, Dolcis shoes, £4.19s.11d. Pourelle short-sleeved top and skirt, £21., Fifth Avenue, W.1. Biba tights, 10s.6d., suede belt, £2.10s. Sacha shoes, £7.19s.6d. 36 Panne velvet is expensive we know — but worth it!
Knickerbockers with short-sleeved top, Pourelle, £18.18s., from Tracy, W.1., Biba canvas boots, £7.10s. Feathers cotton hat and scarf, £2.7s.6d. Clobber midi, £13.13s., Girl, W.1. Quant patterned tights, 16s.11d. Rosie Nice scarf, £1.15s. Browns ring, £3. 3s. Ravel spats, £5.5s.

Emilio Pucci at Fortnum & Mason

1960s, fortnum and mason, Pucci, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Scanned from Vogue, December 1968.

Get in the backseat baby…

1970s, Cerruti, harpers and queen, janice wainwright, Mensday, menswear, Rolls Royce, Vintage Adverts, Washington Tremlett
Clothes by Washington Tremlett. Tie by Cerruti. Janice Wainwright skirt and tabard. Rolls Royce from Jack Barclay Ltd of Berkeley Square.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, December 1976.

Sheer Heaven

1970s, Over 21, pretty polly, Vintage Adverts
Advert for Pretty Polly Sheer Heaven and Stand Easies

Scanned from Over 21 Magazine, December 1973.

Christmas Decoration

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara daly, David Anthony, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Vivienne Lynn

Fantasy and theatre is the theme – lots of colour and glitter the focal points … Fantasy can run the whole gamut, but we like the feel of a ‘Thirties-type Hollywood pin-up pic, the soulful tragi-comic look of a clown or even a glamorous ‘Twenties flapper girl. Take your pick, and choose your own Christmas decorations.

An idea we captured from the realms of Erte, the artist and designer of the ‘Twenties – true theatrical fantasy, ideal for all your Christmas parties, a look which you can create yourself following our instructions.

Hair and the silver sequined skull cap with front forehead curl, was dressed by John at Leonard. To do this style yourself, use sequin strips (available on a card) and wrap them first round the head in a skull cap shape, making sure they sit flat, close an neatly. Leave a small strand of hair free and set it into a little curl. Then, take single hair strands, as we have done, and intertwine them with a sequin strip, like a plait.

Model is Vivienne Lynn.

Make-up by Barbara Daly.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1971.

A Room to Linger In

1970s, cosmopolitan, Harry Hartman, interior design, interiors, thea porter, Tim Street-Porter
Dishy model Michel Julien playing it cool in David Evers’ masculine bathroom.

The bathroom as an erogenous zone.

No room is more intimate than your bathroom. There is nowhere better to relax and get in the mood … to succumb to the sheer sensuality of soaking in scented water, indulging fantasies and anticipating future pleasures.

Your bathroom should be a place to feel beautiful in. to lacquer your toenails or finish a novel, henna your hair, water your plants or even paint a picture. No reason why it shouldn’t be your bathroom-boudoir-dressing-room-studio all in one. Even better if there’s room for a bed .. .

The bathroom is where you imprint your personality. Dare to be exotic with jungle prints, orchids growing in glass tanks. Or keep it cool with ice-white decor, stark modern art, a Japanese Bonsai tree.

Whatever your style, remember the importance of warmth, the comforting feel of thick pile rugs and heated towels. There’s no greater turn-off than getting goose pimples in a chilly cheerless bathroom. We photographed three highly individual bathrooms designed with great flair, and each styled perfectly for their owner’s lives. But all with a single thought in common—comfort.

The lure of the East for international fashion designer, Thea Porter. She designed her Mayfair bathroom with a Moorish interior in mind . . . wide built-in seats with heavily embroidered cushions. a little arch cut into the wall to display treasured objects. Thea doubles her exciting room as a studio, hangs her paintings around the walls.

If you want to please a man, model your bathroom on the one good-looking London businessman David Evers owns, with handsome polished mahogany fitted units, ivory backed brushes and green plants. David says the atmosphere reminds him of a St James’ men’s club.

The third is a fiery red hideaway, a fantastic design by Richard Ohrbach for New Yorker Cynthia Peltz. There’s more than a touch of the womb about this room—very comfortable after a hard day at the office …

Text by Joan Prust-Walters.

Photographs by Tim Street Porter.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, January 1974.

Our model Carole Augustine looks very relaxed in Thea Porter’s bathroom which is just like a Seraglio.
Cynthia PeIlls bathroom is a warm hideaway. (Photographed by Harry Hartman).