What kind of loving is your kind of loving

1970s, cosmopolitan, Dick Ellescas, Illustrations, Inspirational Images

Illustrated by Richard Ellescas.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, September 1975.

On the rocks

1980s, harpers and queen, helmut newton, Inspirational Images, Vintage Adverts, yves saint laurent

Saint Laurent Rive Gauche advert photographed by Helmut Newton.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, March 1983.

Get away from it all

1960s, british boutique movement, granny takes a trip, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images
After a hot hectic day, you need a change of pace. So slip into a soft slinky dress like this one, 9 gns., from Granny Takes a Trip, 488 King’s Road, London, SW10.

(I can’t find a photographer credit for this stunner, so my apologies to them.)

Scanned from Honey magazine, July 1968.

Think Twice

1970s, Club International, Ean Taylor, Illustrations, Inspirational Images

Illustration by Ean Taylor.

Scanned from Club International, August 1976.

What pinafores did next

1970s, anello and davide, Angela at London Town, duc, Gina Fratini, Ginger Group, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, kensington market, kurt geiger, Marielle, mary quant, miss selfridge, Moya Bowler, Titfers, Vintage Editorials, Vogue
Cotton print pinafore over a sweet flowered dress. Deep ruffles on shoulders and a big beautiful bonnet to match. By Titfers at Miss Selfridge. Red button shoes at Anello & Davide.

Long dresses and skirts in crepe and cotton prints – related to others just as small, fresh, sharp or soft, on pinafore smocks and aprons. These are not so much to keep you clean, more to make you look prettier; and you can be dairy maids, kitchen maids, Kate Greenaway girls all through summer.

And so began the kickback against all things clean, crisp and space age…

Photographed by Duc.

Scanned from Vogue, April 1971.

Fine floppy fluted crepe de chine dress by Marielle. Liberty lawn pinafore by Angela at London Town. Brown boots by Moya Bowler for Edouard Jerrold at Kurt Geiger.
Dairy cream cotton smock dress. Leg o’mutton sleeves, buttons up the back, print of wild pale roses and primrose ribbons. Gauzy white pinafore, lace and rose pink ribbons. Both by Gina Fratini. Shoes at Anello & Davide. Lacy pink silk bonnet at Sharon’s Shoppe, Kensington Market.
Cotton and rayon wrap, two sizes of polka dot, white on cherry red patches. By Mary Quant Ginger Group. Cherry and red stripe cotton apron by In Pressler. Natural straw hat at Herbert Johnson.

Shock proof knitwear?

19 magazine, 1970s, Inspirational Images, John Craig, knitwear, marshall lester, Vintage Adverts
Our Tricel disco test: Dressed in Tricel, a couple spent an energetic evening at a discotheque. Come going home time they both felt cool and comfortable despite the crowd. Marshall Lester tops to top the pops in. In a variety of super colours.

Some synthetic fibres become highly charged with static electricity. In a crowd you’ll find they stick to your body something shocking. Not so with man-made Tricel. It’s less static than most synthetics. It absorbs moisture. And because it breathes, it’s much more comfortable. Stick to Tricel. It won’t stick to you.

There’s little I love more than novelty acrylic knitwear, but novelty acrylic knitwear in a groovy scenario such as these, well I just feel spoilt quite frankly.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, 1972.

Knitwear by Peter London
Knitwear by John Craig

On Second Thoughts

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara hulanicki, biba, Inspirational Images, Sarah Moon, Vintage Editorials

For those dreamy moments when you feel you want to look feminine and pretty, when you want to get out of your casual clothes and wear something floaty and special, Biba have made lovely, plain satin and two-tone patchwork satin skirts and tops which are alluring and very glamorous for the summer. They have also designed long, floating cotton voile dresses in large, dark prints which are flattering to figures still suffering from seasonal over-eating.

All clothes from Biba.

Many thanks to Barbara Hulanicki for letting me know that she took these stunning photos (modelled by Eva from Biba). They were uncredited in the magazine.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1970.

Yankee Swank

1970s, biba, Bombacha, Charles Batten, Crocodile, Diane Logan, Fenwick, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, liberty, liberty's, Monet, monty coles, quorum, radley, Spectrum, Sujon, Vintage Editorials, Wardrobe
Giant pink lily printed cotton dress with swirling flared skirt from Biba

City life heats up when the sidewalks are crowded and the cabs full. Give yourself a break and see the sights. Step out in cotton dresses for a cool look at a hot town.

Photographed by Monty Coles.

Scanned from Honey, August 1975.

Open necked short sleeved printed crepe de chine dress by Radley from Quorum. Fringe scarf from Wardrobe. Hat by Charles Batten.
Mint green cotton dress by Strawberry Studio from Che Guevara. Scarf from Fenwick.
Cream cotton dress with drawstring waist by Monet. Scarf from Liberty. Hat by Charles Batten.
Navy and mauve cotton poplin dress by Monet.
Beige and mulberry flower printed crepe de chine dress by Sujon. Scarf from Fenwick.
Slash neck cotton cheesecloth dress from Crocodile. Scarf from Liberty.
Rust cotton open necked baggy dress from Bombacha. Cloche by Diane Logan.
Pale pink and white leaf printed dress from Biba. Scarf from Liberty. Hat by Charles Batten.
Navy and rust checked and striped crepe de chine dress with matching scarf from Spectrum.

Make Wicker Work

1970s, cosmopolitan, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors
Turn your bedroom into a garden-room with plants piled into a wired jardiniere, flowers parked on bamboo tables and a white cotton coverlet on the bed. Do as the Edwardians did – place your sofa at the foot of the bed and enjoy the fine art of lolling.

Take the summer indoors with conservatory furniture that gives the garden feeling to any room.

The merest breath of a heat-wave brings out the Southern Belle in our souls. Hot afternoons and long, sunlit evenings make you long to loll about on wicker chaises, sipping lemon tea. The dry, woody smell, the evocative creak of wicker and cane furniture is the essence of summer and, unlike some summer passions, cane and wicker survive and work in winter, too. Annick Clavier, a young French designer, chooses her wicker well—painting some junk-shop finds in white enamel, oiling other pieces of wicker and bamboo to a fine Oriental shine. Her taste runs to airy, lacy furniture and rush matting, set off by many green plants, small jugs of flowers and reproductions of romantic paintings. The fact that she has a garden helps the tropical feeling. Wicker freaks look for decorative pieces in junk shops and markets. They learn to mend broken furniture but avoid bamboo or cane pieces that are very rickety, and watch for the pinholes—a sign that the dreaded woodworm is in residence. Secondhand shops in coastal towns and the remote parts of Scotland and Wales are good places to find Victorian and Edwardian garden and nursery furniture. London has the best selection of shops with modern cane and rattan furniture, mostly imported: Conran, 77 Fulham Road, SW3 imports from China; Cane, 170 Walton Street, SW3 imports from India, as does The Warehouse, 39 Neal Street, London, WC2.

Photographs by Phillippe Leroy.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1976.

Heads you win

1970s, alkasura, Andreas George, Bermona, Feathers, hans feurer, hats, Inspirational Images, Jean Charles Brosseau, jean shrimpton, liberty, liberty's, mr freedom, quorum, ritva, sunday times magazine, Vintage Editorials
One of a selection of hats designed by Andreas George that are decorated with anything from fake flowers, ribbons, plastic fruit to tiny furry animals. £7 from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3

Suddenly this summer the shops are selling masses of hats that before would have only been dug up for garden parties, weddings, sports days or camping it up. For years magazines and designers have shown their clothes with hats, but they don’t usually turn up in the street. Fashion editors often feature ‘picture hats’ like those on the previous page posed in some romantic setting or framing an immaculate new make-up, but one never actually sees them on a number 19 bus. Now hats have gone the way of all clothes; there are no rules; you can wear anything with anything. Any hat, whether it’s wide-brimmed and floppy with half a haberdashery department stuck over it, or a small crocheted cloche pinned with a bunch of plastic fruit, i fine with either nostalgic Forties’ dresses or a dirty old pair of jeans. And you can still wear it to a wedding if you want to.

Modelled by Jean Shrimpton.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, June 20th 1971.

Smooth straw hat with fake anemones, by Bermona, £2.85 from Dickins and Jones.
Cotton cloche pinned back with a bunch of cherries if you like, £4.50 from Quorum. Check and spot crepe shirt £4.20 from Mr Freedom, 20 Kensington Church Street. White cotton shorts by Ritva £7.88 from Countdown, 137 King’s Road.
Pink felt hat with bright harlequin pattern under the brim by Jean Charles Brosseau, £7 from Feathers, 43 Kensington High Street.
Plain wide-brimmed panama hat, £2.85 from Liberty’s.