Hong Kong

19 magazine, 1970s, Alan Rodin, alice pollock, antony price, Bata, biba, Inspirational Images, John Bishop, Jolly and Marsh, lilley and skinner, Norma Moriceau, ravel, stirling cooper, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, yves saint laurent
Palest green Dicel satin blouse with glass buttons, £5.25. Apple green circular skirt in silk and rayon mixture, £8.75. Both from Universal Witness. Green tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Red patent shoes from Yves Saint Laurent, £14.

The look is tarty—and where better to go for background atmosphere than Hong Kong, sinful city of the Orient, perfect setting for saucy ladies of ill-repute. In this rich, bustling East/West meeting point, with its maze of colourful streets and endless shops bursting with tax-free jade, pearls and cameras. one gets the feeling that beyond these elegant facades are hidden opium dens, James Bond intrigues, and seamy Suzie Wong bars. We took the ferry across from Kowloon to Hong Kong and travelled to Aberdeen—a small, picturesque harbour inlet filled with over eight thousand junks and sampans, ornate floating restaurants selling delicious, fresh seafood, and crowded local markets.

Styled by Norma Moriceau.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1971.

The styling and clothes in this editorial (I mean, green tights and red platforms? Swoon!) are something close to flawless. Unlike the copy -which I have still posted as a historical document- and also, possibly, the use of local residents as ‘extras’. I occasionally feel the need to clarify that I don’t necessarily endorse all elements of things I post, but I also don’t think it benefits us to completely censor history – especially when one is creating an archive.

Satin print blouse, from Van Der Fransen, £2. Blue cotton skirt with white print and ruffled dipping hem, by Universal Witness, £7.35. Tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Purple leather sandals, from Bata International, £7. Satin shawl with black fringing, from Van Der Fransen, £5.
White sleeveless Dicel satin dress with large blue flower design, by Universal Witness, £14.70. Apple green mock lizard sandals, by Bally, £6-50. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Moss crepe dress by Alice Pollock at Radley, £13.50. Tight by Mary Quant, 75p. Patent wedge sandals by Yves Saint Laurent, £14. Bracelets from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
White crepe dress with moon print and matching shorts by Antony Price at Stirling Cooper, £10. Ankle strap shoes, from Ravel, £5.99.
Cotton jersey halter-neck top and slit skirt in green and yellow floral print, by Alan Rodin, £5. Navy suede laced sandals, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Black Tricel dress with beige print has cap sleeves and sash tie, by Biba, £8.55. Navy sandals with lacings, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Neckklace from a selection at Kensington Market. Rings are model’s own. Flower from Fogg and Wakefield.

Smart Things

19 magazine, alice pollock, british boutique movement, Digby Howard, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, manolo blahnik, ossie clark, quorum, sheridan barnett, Vintage Editorials, zapata

A 19 SPECIAL PREVIEW OF AN EXCITING DESIGNER’S COLLECTION

Sheridan Barnett, pictured above, is the young designer who gave Coopers such a good look and who has now joined the Quorum label, with Ossie Clark and Alice Pollock. At twenty-six, he has established himself as the most exciting designer in London, with a fabulous first collection for Quorum that left them clapping in the aisles. Women’s Wear Daily, the fashion bible of America, devoted an entire double-page spread to his collection, previously unheard of for an English designer. He designs with his girlfriend, a ballet dancer, in mind, and ladies like Grace Coddington, model Eija and Liza Minnelli: “Girls who are individual and chic, interesting, attractive and with oomph . .” and likes them to look alluring, classy and sexy. At the moment, his clothes are expensive but we are hopeful that, later on, they will be available in the cheaper Radley range as Ossie Clark’s clothes are. Meanwhile look out for similar lines.

My slightly belated tribute to the great Sheridan Barnett, who died in November. He is one of those many British designers of the time whose work doesn’t really get the attention he deserves; as you can see here his tailoring was exquisite.

All clothes by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum.

Shoes by Zapata. Hats by Digby Howard.

Hair by Ricci Burns.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, September 1973.

Cosmo Girls: José Fonseca

1970s, alice pollock, cosmopolitan, Inspirational Images, José Fonseca, Michael Berkofsky, ossie clark, Penny Graham, quorum, sheridan barnett
José at play relaxing at the Meridiana restaurant Long wrap dress made in crepe de Chine by Sheridan Barnett for Quorum.

José Fonseca is the co-owner of Models One, a busy model agency with top names like Marisa Berenson and Lauren Hutton on the books.

“As a child, I loved fancy dress and I still like breaking the fashion rules. I go to the office in clothes that can take me to a party afterwards—I just don’t know how to wear casual clothes perhaps because I hate my bottom! I feel more like a woman in long skirts than in pants or jeans. Ever since Ossie Clark made his first mid-calf skirt I have been trailing along—Ossie-style. I wear a lot of black because it always makes me feel fantastic. I like the anonymity of black and the way you can use it as a foil for jewellery and scarves. I went mad on sequins last winter. I bought jackets, berets, even a gold sequin ‘Twenties theatrical outfit—I like to sparkle. I wear a lot of make-up as I feel I can hide behind it. My hair used to be straight but I wanted a change so I had it cut and curled and then permed. But I’m going to grow it out.”

This is a part of a larger feature with ‘real’ Cosmo women putting fashion to the test, but this is definitely my favourite one.

Fashion by Penny Graham.

Photographed by Mike Berkofsky.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, March 1974.

José at work in a black crepe and satin top and long skirt by Alice Pollock. Ivory beads and silver belt were found in an antique market.

“Whatever she selects has taste…”

1970s, alice pollock, british boutique movement, cosmopolitan, ossie clark, quorum, Random Ossies in Adverts, Vintage Adverts

Obviously I do not condone the message as regards the product being advertised here, but what an amazing, ephemeral capture of the Quorum boutique window with Ossies on both the model and the mannequin (‘Bridget’ and ‘Cuddly’ respectively). I also think that might possibly be the ghostly figure of Alice Pollock in the background.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1973.

Anarchists go their own sweet way

alice pollock, beauty, biba, gala, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Jill Harley, kari ann muller, Make-up, Steve Hiett

They break boring beauty traditions and riot lip colours go on eyes, eye colours go on lips. Upside down- Quite contrary. And why not? Make-up was getting so dreary. We just stuck to the rules and slicked warm colours—pink, amber, soft orange—on our mouths, and cool colours—grey, green, blue, brown—on our eyes. Till now. Till the anarchists started this new groove. Now things are happening. Putting on a face isn’t a daily chore to be done as quickly as possible. Make-up is something to enjoy. It’s art. Total fun. Total fantasy. After all, painting on warm mobile skin is so much more exciting than .cold fiat paper or canvas. Come, join the anarchy party and experiment with colour. Sit down this evening in front of a well-lit mirror, not the telly, and design surprise eyes.

Alice Pollock (top) says she would like to be invisible (can’t think why) and her favourite perfume is Chanel No. 5. She has tried every hair colour under the sun, including green, but she’s glad it’s her own shade now—”At least I know who I am when I wake up.” Every morning she washes it in the bath with Boots Herbal Shampoo, 2s. 11d. On her eye-lids she paints Leichner’s Ivory Stick No. 5, 5s. 3d., and then an arc of pale green under the brow and round along the cheek-bone. Her lip-colour is a mixture of the same Leichner stick and Christian Dior’s Sepia 61 lipstick, 15s.


Moon (centre left, whose real name is Constance Mullens and who was nicknamed after a South African cartoon character called Moon Mullens) wears Mary Quant’s Citrus Jeepers Peepers, 18s. 7d., on her eye-lids and a purple Caran D’ache water crayon all round the eyes to tone with her hair which is cleverly coloured mauve and butterscotch by Erik and styled by Herta at Vidal Sassoon, Grosvenor House; 01-629 2463. Her favourite perfume is jasmin and, asked what the most vital beauty product is, she said, “a razor.”


Gala Mitchell (centre right) is a beautifully original actress. You may have seen her before in Ken Russell’s television film about the Pre-Raphaelites. Her most treasured beauty product is lipstick. Here she’s wearing Biba’s purple lip-tint, 5s., with black liner round her mouth. She uses more of Revlon’s Natural Wonder Lid Liners, 17s. 6d., to paint intriguing black spots across part of her face to symbolise a veil, and then twists a string of blue curls, tinted by Erik, amongst her copper hair which she keeps in place with two ’40s tortoiseshell hair-combs.


Kari Ann Moller (bottom left) says she wants to look like the wicked witch in fairy tales, yet she loves cosy perfumes like Apple Blossom and Lily of the Valley (Coty’s Muguet des Bois Creamy Skin Parfum, 17s. 6d.), and she couldn’t live without Nivea. “I found an old purple crayon in my boyfriend’s car—he’s a painter—so I’m wearing purple with a dab of lipstick and Leichner silver sparklers on my eyes today, plus tart red lipstick by Elizabeth Arden.” Her soft ginger wig is by Ricci Burns, 151 Kings Rd., S.W.3.


Jill Harley (bottom right) never wears fake eyelashes now, she’s only interested in colour: Chrome stick by Leichner.. 5s. 3d., with Gait orange paint near the socket line and Dorothy Gray’s Light-Up Yellow lipstick, 11s. 6d., as a highlighter for her eyes. Woltz ltaliana’s pale green polish, Laguna, goes on her nails to match up with her pale green wellingtons. Instead of expensive face-shapers, she brushes on Miners’ Frosted Brown Powder Eye Shadow, 2s. 10d. For her lips, she mixes an old red lipstick with Boots 17 Shiny Brown Eye Shadow Stick, 2s. 6d.

Two of my favourite models + one of my favourite designers + some wild 1970 make-up = happy Liz.

Photographed by Steve Hiett.

Scanned from Honey, September 1970.

Knits in Venice

1970s, alice pollock, Donna Jordan, jap, karl lagerfeld, kenzo, pat cleveland, Venice, Vogue
Alice Pollock

Snia Viscosa jumped right in at the deep end in Venice, invited twenty eccentric different and talented designers to do their own thing with their threads. The result was a spectacular Magliamoda at the Palazzo Grassi on the Grand Canal, and this is what Alice Pollock, Kenzo of Jap and Karl Lagerfeld did with it. What a show!

Photographers uncredited.

Scanned from Vogue, December 1971.

Kenzo of Jap
Karl Lagerfeld

Alice Through Our Looking Glass

19 magazine, 1970s, alice pollock, caroline arber, Duggie Fields, Inspirational Images, ossie clark, quorum, radley, Vintage Editorials

Alice Pollock is a dreamy sort of girl – incredibly thin with large, sullen eyes and wispy hair. Emancipated yet feminine she is the other half of the Quorum design team. She and Ossie Clark design beautiful clothes for their shop in the King’s Road and also produce a special budget range for Radley which is sold all over the country.

She lives in an enormous flat with her three children, a cat and a canary. At the moment she is in the throes of redecoration. One room she has already painted bright green – it is sparsely furnished with simple, modern furniture and some good paintings on the walls. The shelves are crammed with objects she has picked up in junk shops – glass cylinders filled with dried flowers, Art Nouveau statues and books.

Her bedroom is extremely large and feminine, with an old, junky dressing table covered with flowers. Tulips, freesias and azaleas are her favourites at the moment. Her vast wardrobe is crammed full of clothes – mainly her own designs and a few old clothes she has found in junk shops.

During the day Alice wears no make-up at all, and for the evening she makes up only her lips and eyes from a Leichner paintbox. Currently she is wearing a silvery green on her lips and a dark red on her eyes – which somehow looks all right. She washes her hair every day in a herb shampoo and never sets it – just shakes her head as it is drying and separates the ends with her fingers.

Her evenings she usually spends with friends, going out to dinner or occasionally to pop concerts, but the weekends she spends with her children.

Her spring collection has a very romantic, feminine feeling, the fabrics are the softest – chiffons, silks and occasionally cotton jersey – and the colours are palest blues, lemons, pinks and greys. She has maintained a long look for both day and evening, but in a few styles the length has crept up to just below the knee.

All clothes are by Alice Pollock.

Photographed by Caroline Arber.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, April 1970.

Be Wilder Still

1960s, alice pollock, celia birtwell, Illustrations, ossie clark, petticoat magazine, quorum, Richard Evans

be wilder still

Ever been to bed in satin or gone to work in lizard, looked through chiffon or wore a cardigan to your knees? Well we haven’t either, but Grandmother might have. The Ossie Clark and Alice Pollock Autumn Collection was full of these new things from old. Quorum clothes have a habit of being way ahead of their competitors and you always have to pay for originality. Even if you can’t afford to buy there they point the way ahead so look hard. There were maxi-length tweed coats in pinks and greens, long suede suits with lizard insets. Skirts and trousers were long and flowing, blouses were in flouncy chiffon or giselle. There were butterfly dresses in flimsy chiffon, with streams of flowing scarves tied to the ankles or wrists. There was a mass of creamy satin made into long quilted coats or glamorous trouser suits. There were satin dressing gowns with matching pants and bra. Also flowing crêpe suits with satin trimmings, tight-knitted jumpers flecked with stripes of bright colours. And more and more….

Sadly some of the prices were wild too but the ideas are yours for the copying.

A perfect example of why the demise of the illustrated fashion editorial was so unjust.

Words by Sue Hone. Illustrated by Richard Evans.

Scanned from Petticoat, November 1968.

Get Shirty

1970s, Adrian Mann, alice pollock, alkasura, Butler & Wilson, cacharel, che guevara, Dick Polak, Honey Magazine, Ian Batten, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, Joseph, marie france, quorum, Roger Nelson, stirling cooper, Susie Craker, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials

get shirty 3

LEFT: Salmon pink crepe overblouse with short fluted sleeves, Marie France for Quorum £10 approx, from Quorum, 52 Radnor Wealk, SW3 and Heath Street, NW3 ; Quorum shops at all branches of Peter Robinson. Satin trousers, Alkasura £6.50, ,from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3. Apricot beads £5, amber bangles from 20p each, wide yellow bangle £2, all from Emeline. RIGHT: Crêpe shirred blouse. with tie neck, Alice Pollock at.Quorum £10 approx, from Quorum, 52 Radnor Walk, SW3 and Heath Street, NW3; Quorum shops at all branches of Peter Robinson. Green satin trousers, Jeff Banks £7.50, from Jeff Banks Shop at Peter Robinson, Oxford Circus, W1; City Stylish, Newcastle. Gilt dress clips, Universal Witness from 25p each.

The season of the shirt. Wild and waisted. Smart, sharp and snappy. Crisp, cuffed sleeves for the new tight and tailored look. Soft and slinky overblouses to revive the romantic 40s.

The first picture has got to be one of my favourite fashion shots of all time. Such joy in movement, perfect lighting, and harmonious colours from the most heavenly Quorum clothes.

Photographed by Dick Polak.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey Magazine, May 1973.

get shirty 1

LEFT: Crisp white crêpe pintucked overblouse £8.50, from all branches of Bus Stop (mail order 30p from 3 Kensington Church Street W8). Satin trousers, Alkasura £6.50, from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3, Thin patent belt, Gay Designs 69p; sea green waist-length bead necklace £4.50, short green necklace £3, and art-deco bangles £2 each, all from a selection at Butler & Wilson. RIGHT: Neat cotton sports shirt with patch pockets, Cacharel at Joseph £8.50, from Joseph, 33b King’s Road, SW3 (mail order 25p). White cotton trousers, Jeff Banks £7.50, from Che Guevara, Kensington High Street, W8 (mail order 25p) ; Jeff Banks shop at Peter Robinson, Oxford Circus, W1. Thin leather belt, Baggage Et General £1.10; plum plastic bangles, Adrien Mann 25p.

get shirty 2

LEFT: Finely striped cotton casual shirt, Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper £6.50, from Stirling Cooper, 94 New Bond Street, W1 ; Stirling Cooper shops at DH Evans, Oxford Street, W1 ; Peter Robinson, Oxford Circus, W1, Leeds, Norwich and Cardiff ; Escalade, Brompton Road, SW3; Kendal Milne, Manchester. Gaberdine Oxford bags, Alkasura £9.50, from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3. Long polka-dot scarf, Van der Fransen £1 ; wide amber bangle, Paul Stephens 25p; ebony clutch bangle, Adrien Mann £1 ; stretchy webbing belt, Gay Designs £4. RIGHT: Button-through striped cotton blouse with matching attached cravat and deep cuffed sleeves, Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper £7.50 (stockists as for shirt above). Cotton trousers, Jeff Banks £7.50, from Che Guevara, Kensington High Street, W8 (mail order 25p) ; Jeff Banks shop, Peter Robinson, Oxford Circus W1. Enamel dress clips, Universal Witness from 25p each; wavy webbing belt, Gay Designs £4; amder bangles, Emeline 20p each.

get shirty 4

LEFT Smartly striped square-necked. crepe-de-chine overblouse with set-in short sleeves, Suzy Craker at Roger Nelson £9.50, from Way In, Harrods, Knightsbridge, SW1 (mail order 25p) Che Guevara, Kensington High Street, W8 ; Crocodile, Kensington High Street, W8 and .branches. Lilac Trevira trousers, Jakie Ross at Jon Elliott £6.70, from D H Evans, Oxford Street, W1 ; I Spy, Oxford Street, W1 ; Sidney. Smith, King’s Road, SW3; Hendersons, Liverpool. Elastic and leather belt from a selection at Escalade ; bangles, Emeline £2 each. RIGHT : Rainbow striped loose overblouse with sweetheart neckline and puff sleeves, Ian Batten at Siding Cooper 16.50, from Stirling Cooper, 94 New Bond Street, W1 ; Stirling Cooper shops at D H Evans, Oxford Street, W1 Escalade, Brompton Road, SW3; Peter Robinson, Oxford Circus, W1, Leeds, Norwich and Cardiff ; Kendal Milne, Manchester. Gaberdine Oxford bags. Alkasura £8, from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3. Lime green patent belt, Gay Designs 69p; long bobble beads, Paul Stephens, 85p.

How to Dress with Drama

1970s, alice pollock, Gina Fratini, helen mirren, Hildebrand, james wedge, observer magazine, Sacha, Sacha, zandra rhodes

helen mirren by james wedge

Far Left. Printed Italian voile dress with smocked bodice and medieval sleeves, grey/blue, 8-14, Gina -Fratini, £49, from Harrods ; Chic, Hampstead, NW3 ; Sheila Worth, Kendal Street, W2. Centre. Wraparound kimono in Lurex printed with Zandra Rhodes design, pink/lilac/silver or green/ orange/gold, 10-16, Hildebrand, £23, from Harrods, Knightsbridge, SW1 ; Kendal Milne, Manchester : Strava-ganza, Harrogate. Right. Crepe de chine dress, se-quinned bodice, black only, 10 and 12, by Alice Pollock, £62.50, from Fifth Avenue, King’s Road, SW3 ; or enquiries to Quorum, 6 Burnsall Street, SW3. Suede wedge-soled sandals, 3-8, f5.99, from branches of Sacha.

Clothes currently in fashion are of such contradictory styles that they seem to demand of the wearer a talent for acting beyond the capacity of most women. It takes a skilled actress to switch easily from cool Japanese geisha girl to 1940s tart and remember which part she’s playing. Helen Mirren, associate member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, shows how it’s done, with a toss of her head, a quick change in facial expression, a swivel of hip and heel. The dresses she wears here all have sleeves that require dramatic gestures : medieval pointed sleeves, kimono sleeves, and sleeves slashed from the shoulder. You don’t have to be an actress to wear these dresses, but it does help.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from The Observer Magazine, 11th July 1971.