Butterfleyes

1970s, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Make-up, Miners, petticoat magazine, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Petticoat, 26th June 1971.

Snappy Tops

19 magazine, 1970s, Badges and Equipment, Brave New World, Inspirational Images, lord john, Michael Berkofsky, platforms, Sacha, The Pant House, The Rag Machine
Blue T-shirt with very low back and dancing girl motif on front, by Brave New World, £5.50. Old jeans, from The Rag Machine, £5. Pink metallic leather shoes, from Sacha, £12.99. / White cotton hat from Herbert Johnson, £2.75. Faded denim shirt with stud buttons, from The Pant House, £6. Old jeans from The Rag Machine, £5. Shoes and belt are model’s own.

All the couture in the world can’t stop me still getting excited about a long sleeve printed tee, flared jeans and metallic pink platforms.

Photographed by Michael Berkofsky.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1973.

Old blue denim hat, from Badges and Equipment, 80p. Cotton jersey, Alice in Wonderland T-shirt from Lord John, £5.95. Old blue denim jeans from The Rag Machine, £5. / Pin-ball machine patterned cotton jersey T-shirt, from Lord John, £5.95. Old blue jeans from The Rag Machine, £5.

Perfection and Delia

1970s, guy bourdin, hair, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Make-up, pablo and delia, Vintage Editorials, Vogue, yves saint laurent
Pablo and Delicious — heightened Ophelia eyes and lips, veils of colours • • • The Face by Gala: Honey Beige Barely There foundation with Swiss Candy Cream Blusher and Honey Beige Sheer Finish Compressed Powder. Eyes, new Pebble Grey Eye Pen and Matte Shadow, with Brownish Black Liquilash Mascara. New Riviera Red Supersmooth Lip Pen for a sharp edge. Peach silk chiffon dress, see again overleaf; sparkled palest peach organza mantilla girdled with embroidered silk lace : Pura, to order, at Fortnum & Mason.

Perfection and Delia — silks for clowns and angels … Something rare in a classic world — droll, beautiful follies by Pablo & Delia, who never make anything that bores them, and dress all the clowns and angels in London. Madly beautiful new year silks and the faces you’ll wear with them.

Pablo and Delia and Guy Bourdin – the most heavenly of combinations.

Hair by Valentin at Jacques Dessanges. Make-up by Heidi Morawetz.

Photographed by Guy Bourdin.

Scanned from Vogue, 1st April 1974.

Peach silk chiffon, right, overlapping like petals to the floor, two trains looping up to fingers, flowers of organza and tinsel, with lime veil leaves ; organza/lace mantilla : Pura, to order, at Fortnum & Mason.
Lipstick red frills, silk georgette, this page, with gold sequinned rose, red silk organza mantilla with blossoms : Maya, to order at Browns ; The Shop, 44 Sloane St. Golden shoes, £29, Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. Sizes, colours, see Stockists. The face : vivid, ethereal, a little fevered and flushed, eyes shining out of darkness. By Boots No 7 : Nearly Natural Skin Tone foundation with Cherry Stroke -A-Blush blusher, Nearly Natural Translucent Loose Powder ; Hazy Navy Shadow Mist powder eye shadow, Pink King Size Make-Up Pencil around eyes, Black Superlash mascara, Soft Brown Brow Shaper : Ruby Wine Lip Polish
Pablo and Delia – just dream dressing in silk follies . . Snow silk georgette, this page, sheathed around body, with sash of golden cord; breeze-blue organza mantilla, golden-edged flame flowers scattered by a zephyr : Narcissus, to order at Browns ; The Shop, 14. Sloane St. Snakeskin shoes, about £30, Saint Laurent Rive Gauche.
Tigerlily red silk georgette, this page, embroidered with silvery medallions, tier on tier stitched round in white : Gala, to order at Browns ; The Shop, 44 Sloane St. Gold snakeskin high heeled sandals, about £30 Saint Laurent Rive Gauche.

Marianne Faithfull

1970s, cosmopolitan, Inspirational Images, marianne faithfull, norman eales, ossie clark
“I like drag and I like girls playing boys. I think it’s very sexy’.

Marianne Faithfull illustrating an article entitled ‘Women in Drag: Not a fetish but a turn on’. While the article itself is a bit, questionable in its attitude (and written by a man), it does give us this incredible photo of Marianne. Who is also wearing an Ossie Clark suit, just to make it even better.

Photographed by Norman Eales.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, April 1974.

Go East! Collect Flowers of Japanese Couture

1970s, Hanae Mori, Hiroko, Inspirational Images, lord snowdon, snowdon, Vintage Editorials, Vogue

In Japan, land of the blossoming couture, Hanae Mori is a favourite daughter. Her clothes mix European classic design with oriental tradition, the Madame Butterfly fabrics are her on creation, she veils them layer on layer.

Her first boutique opened in 1947, the present score is twenty-five, and seventeen factories, hundreds of delightfully dressed ladies east and west —actresses, embassy wives, even crown princesses.

Since 1962 she has sold in New York. And now, in Harrods’ International Row, a unique few will arrive twice ayear to join Antonellis, Lanvins, Givenchys and others in their global collection.

Flowering in Hanae Mori silks here, tiny Hiroko, ex-Cardin favourite model, beautiful from the top of her black pageboy bob to the soles, of size two-and-a-half geta. Above: Crocus and chrysanthemum sunset chiffon over satin, mandarin coat and slit dress of matching print.

Below: Huge white and rose daisies on inky chiffon over a printed silk slip. Long scarf From £250 each,in a range at Harrods. Pearls by Mikimoto. Hiroko’ s Gala make-up: Orange Dazzle over Poppy Dazzle Super-smooth lipstick, Flame Darle nail polish

Photographed by Snowdon.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1972.

Shoes in the Shade

1970s, charles jourdan, guy bourdin, harpers and queen, Inspirational Images, shoes, Vintage Adverts

Advert for Charles Jourdan shoes.

Photographed by Guy Bourdin.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, April 1974.

Daisy suede and other shorts

1970s, Beged'Or, Boston-151, chopper, Feathers, Inspirational Images, mr freedom, rowley and oram, Sue Baloo, terry de havilland, tuttabankem, Vogue, Zwarts
Rusty suede scalloped and sewn with ink painted daisies. Excellent small cap-shouldered jerkin of the same. By Tuttabankem at Boston-151. Suede by Gomshall Tanneries. Lurid lurex striped t-shirt by Mr Freedom. Feathered butterfly at Zwarts. / Maroon suede jeans shorts on bib and strap by Beged-Or at Debenham & Freebody. Neon panne velvet t-shirt, ice cream cone pin and tights at Mr Freedom. Zany felt patchwork hats at Feathers. Two-tone suede shoes at Rowley & Oram.

Blue skies, fresh air, freewheeling and summer suede shorts. This way.

Unusually for Vogue, this spread doesn’t credit a photographer. It also credits those amazing shoes to Rowley and Oram, who stocked Terry de Havilland’s shoes, so I suspect that they are by him as well.

Scanned from Vogue, April 15th 1971.

Piero de Monzi

1970s, Boutiques, british boutique movement, Cerruti, Chloe, Piero de Monzi, Vintage Adverts, Vogue
Clothes by Chloe and Cerruti at Piero de Monzi. Painting by Robert Cottingham from the DM Gallery. Furniture and Fendi luggage at Condotti.

Advert for the Piero de Monzi boutique in Fulham Road.

Scanned from Vogue, April 15th 1975.

The Main Attraction

19 magazine, 1970s, biba, Brosseau, bus stop, crowthers, edward mann, florrie carr, Fogg and Wakefield, Harri Peccinotti, harriet, Herbert Johnson, hollywood clothes shop, Ian Batten, Inspirational Images, Jasper, Jean Charles Brosseau, Jolly and Marsh, kensington market, lee bender, Marielle, mary quant, ravel, Rosie Nice, Sacha, Sportaville, Titfers, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials
Red spotty blouse in burnt out crepe, worn over black, red and white printed Dycella skirt by Ian Batten at Sportaville. Red tights by Lovely Lady. Scarf by Jasper. Black leather t-bar shoes from Sacha. Bag and bangles from a selection at Jolly and Marsh. Sweetheart brooch from Universal Witness. / Red cloche hat by Titfers. Dress in three different prints by Van der Fransen. Tights by Mary Quant. Shoes by Sacha. Red gloves from Van der Fransen. Necklace and bangles from Jolly and Marsh, Kensington Market. / Little pink bows on a white moss crepe dress by Florrie Carr. Artificial flowers in hair are by Fogg and Wakefield.

The main attraction of this summer’s printed dress is their little-girl, Sunday-best quality. The star fabric is floral crepe-de-Chine, now beautifully revived, featuring softly shaped skirts, Peter Pan collars and puff sleeves.

Another flawless example of early Seventies nostalgia for the Thirties and Forties, which might seem frivolous or twee if it wasn’t in the talented hands of Mr Peccinotti.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, March 1971.

Multi coloured rayon crepe dress from a nearly new selection at Van der Fransen. Blue suede shoes by Mary Quant. / Calf-length crepe de Chine dress by Marielle. Black leather high heeled shoes from The Hollywood Clothes Shop. / Yellow sisal hat by Jean-Charles Brosseau. Crepe de Chine dress by Mary Quant. Lilac suede shoes by Mary Quant.
Brown cotton voile dress and tights by Mary Quant. White strappy sandals by Ravel. / Brown rayon jersey dress by Ian Batten at Sportaville. Beige suede slingbacks by Mary Qant. Scarf from a selection at Rosie Nice, Kensington Market. / Navy felt hat from Herbert Johnson. Navy spotted rayon crepe dress from Van der Fransen. Brown suede shoes by Sacha. / Lilac cloche by Edward Mann. Rayon georgette blouse and purple velvet skirt both from Crowthers. Mauve patent sandals from Ravel.
Brown printed georgette suit from Bus Stop. Green leather wedge heeled shoes from The Hollywood Clothes Shop. / Burgundy felt hat from Herbert Johnson. Black georgette suit from Bus Stop. Black three bar shoes by Sacha. / Green straw hat from a selection at Van der Fransen. Rayon georgette dress by Mary Quant. Green leather shoes from The Hollywood Clothes Shop. / Yellow hat by Jean-Charles Brosseau. Red, white and bloue dress by Ian Batten at Sportaville. Patent wedge sandals by Ravel.
Pale mustard puff sleeved dress by Biba. Brown patent two-strap shoes by Sacha. Scarf by Jasper. / Cream sisal hat by Bermona. Black tea dance dress with delicate white flowery print by Biba. White leather sandals by Ravel. / Navy felt hat from Herbert Johnson. Navy cotton dress by Harriet. Black shoes from The Hollywood Clothes Shop.

A python in her room

1960s, 1970s, Art Kane, Inspirational Images, Margrit Ramme, Queen magazine, thea porter

“You love your boyfriend and he’s left you. You’re alone in a big city and an empty apartment.” Kane had not yet picked up his camera, but Margrit Ramme was working on the sadness. She was also scared of the snake. The editors of Queen magazine had asked for an entire issue to be called “Art Kane’s New York,” including fashions, and he had said all right—but don’t expect to see laughing girls running down Fifth Avenue. He had just divorced his second wife, had not yet met Jean Pagliuso or photographed Larry Rivers, and felt fairly bitter.

If you want to call it Art Kane’s New York, he told Queen, you’ll have to accept pictures showing that the place right now is kind of empty for me. Righto, they said.

He left the studio and rummaged around for real-life locations. He had found the apartment on Gramercy Park, and decided to shoot the fashions there before the furniture came in. Truth is, he wasn’t motivated entirely by a desire to display his mood. Not only does training as an art director make him look for a theme when he has space for an essay, as against a bunch of random shots that just present the merchandise; Art Kane loves almost more than anything else to tell a story.

He also loves snakes. The first boy scout in the Bronx to get a Reptile Study merit badge, he kept 32 of them at home despite a mother who tried to make him flush the first one down the toilet.

This story would reflect the dilemma of a lovely woman—always beautifully dressed, of course—searching for a man, for identity, for something. A snake would be not only an obvious male symbol but also a reminder of a Garden of Eden to start it off. Since Kane had given, his collection to the Bronx Zoo when he was drafted, he called All-Tame Animals, a pro-vider of non-human performers in New York. They referred him to a snake owner in one of the city’s residential hotels, asking that he be discreet; she would be evicted if the manage-ment discovered that she kept a boa constrictor and a python in her room. So Kane was Uncle Joe when he called to ask about Cousin Bea: “She must be a really big girl by now. Oh, six feet six, that sounds good.” And Patricia? “Over eight feet tall? My goodness.” He went over to see them. Their owner showed him the boa in her bathtub and pulled the python out of a closet. “Terrific,” he said. “Bring them up to my place at 10 o’clock tomorrow.”

When she arrived with the snakes in a laundry bag, Kane was moving white window shades up and down, studying the way they filtered the natural light he would use all day. Morning light came softly through the west-facing windows of the living room. He arranged the python, then stood back to peer through a Nikon. Moving forward, back, left, right, he kept the model close to the center of the frame. He was using a 24mm lens, not only for depth of field that would keep the picture sharp from front to back but also to make objects near the edges seem to lean away, focusing attention on the center.

“Okay, Margrit, you’re unhappy, unaware, the two of you can never really come together. . . .” Bracketing—one shot at a normal exposure, one above, one below—he redesigned the picture as he moved. “That’s it, keep it, keep it,” he told her when he liked what was happening. “Now, hold every pose for three clicks and then change … Beautiful. Now keep that until I say stop. I want to explore this until we’ve eaten it up.”

Ninety minutes later he had eaten up the male-female situation (above) and moved to the bedroom (below) to set up an identity problem. A second model had arrived. “You’re clothed and you’re naked,” Kane said, “you’re really the same woman, trying to figure out who you are.” This time he wanted to stretch the image more alarmingly toward the edges, so he put on the 21mm lens that he had used to shock the editors of Vogue on his first fashion assignment.

Images originally published in Queen magazine .

(date not given but looks circa 1969/70 to me, especially given Queen merged with Harpers Bazaar in 1970).

Clothes are uncredited here but both look like Thea Porter to me.

Photographed by Art Kane.

Scanned from Art Kane: The Persuasive Image, 1975.