Soft and Pretty

1970s, biba, clobber, David Finch, Dolcis, Feathers, gillian richard, Inspirational Images, petticoat magazine, Pourelle, ravel, Rosie Nice, Sacha, Sue Hone, Vintage Editorials
Gillian Richard dress, £17.10s., Miss Selfridge, W.1. Biba tights, 10s.6d. Biba choker, £1.2s. Ravel shoes, £6.19s. 11d.

Softly, softly, ever so gently, it’s velvet— printed! It’s as pretty as a picture—so cling to it

Styling by Sue Hone.

Photographed by David Finch.

Scanned from Petticoat Magazine, 3rd October 1970.

Pourelle midi with laced-front jacket, 131.10s., Fifth Avenue shops, Quant tights, 15s.11d. Biba butterfly, Dolcis shoes, £4.19s.11d. Pourelle short-sleeved top and skirt, £21., Fifth Avenue, W.1. Biba tights, 10s.6d., suede belt, £2.10s. Sacha shoes, £7.19s.6d. 36 Panne velvet is expensive we know — but worth it!
Knickerbockers with short-sleeved top, Pourelle, £18.18s., from Tracy, W.1., Biba canvas boots, £7.10s. Feathers cotton hat and scarf, £2.7s.6d. Clobber midi, £13.13s., Girl, W.1. Quant patterned tights, 16s.11d. Rosie Nice scarf, £1.15s. Browns ring, £3. 3s. Ravel spats, £5.5s.

Emilio Pucci at Fortnum & Mason

1960s, fortnum and mason, Pucci, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Scanned from Vogue, December 1968.

Get in the backseat baby…

1970s, Cerruti, harpers and queen, janice wainwright, Mensday, menswear, Rolls Royce, Vintage Adverts, Washington Tremlett
Clothes by Washington Tremlett. Tie by Cerruti. Janice Wainwright skirt and tabard. Rolls Royce from Jack Barclay Ltd of Berkeley Square.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, December 1976.

Sheer Heaven

1970s, Over 21, pretty polly, Vintage Adverts
Advert for Pretty Polly Sheer Heaven and Stand Easies

Scanned from Over 21 Magazine, December 1973.

Christmas Decoration

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara daly, David Anthony, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Vivienne Lynn

Fantasy and theatre is the theme – lots of colour and glitter the focal points … Fantasy can run the whole gamut, but we like the feel of a ‘Thirties-type Hollywood pin-up pic, the soulful tragi-comic look of a clown or even a glamorous ‘Twenties flapper girl. Take your pick, and choose your own Christmas decorations.

An idea we captured from the realms of Erte, the artist and designer of the ‘Twenties – true theatrical fantasy, ideal for all your Christmas parties, a look which you can create yourself following our instructions.

Hair and the silver sequined skull cap with front forehead curl, was dressed by John at Leonard. To do this style yourself, use sequin strips (available on a card) and wrap them first round the head in a skull cap shape, making sure they sit flat, close an neatly. Leave a small strand of hair free and set it into a little curl. Then, take single hair strands, as we have done, and intertwine them with a sequin strip, like a plait.

Model is Vivienne Lynn.

Make-up by Barbara Daly.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1971.

A Room to Linger In

1970s, cosmopolitan, Harry Hartman, interior design, interiors, thea porter, Tim Street-Porter
Dishy model Michel Julien playing it cool in David Evers’ masculine bathroom.

The bathroom as an erogenous zone.

No room is more intimate than your bathroom. There is nowhere better to relax and get in the mood … to succumb to the sheer sensuality of soaking in scented water, indulging fantasies and anticipating future pleasures.

Your bathroom should be a place to feel beautiful in. to lacquer your toenails or finish a novel, henna your hair, water your plants or even paint a picture. No reason why it shouldn’t be your bathroom-boudoir-dressing-room-studio all in one. Even better if there’s room for a bed .. .

The bathroom is where you imprint your personality. Dare to be exotic with jungle prints, orchids growing in glass tanks. Or keep it cool with ice-white decor, stark modern art, a Japanese Bonsai tree.

Whatever your style, remember the importance of warmth, the comforting feel of thick pile rugs and heated towels. There’s no greater turn-off than getting goose pimples in a chilly cheerless bathroom. We photographed three highly individual bathrooms designed with great flair, and each styled perfectly for their owner’s lives. But all with a single thought in common—comfort.

The lure of the East for international fashion designer, Thea Porter. She designed her Mayfair bathroom with a Moorish interior in mind . . . wide built-in seats with heavily embroidered cushions. a little arch cut into the wall to display treasured objects. Thea doubles her exciting room as a studio, hangs her paintings around the walls.

If you want to please a man, model your bathroom on the one good-looking London businessman David Evers owns, with handsome polished mahogany fitted units, ivory backed brushes and green plants. David says the atmosphere reminds him of a St James’ men’s club.

The third is a fiery red hideaway, a fantastic design by Richard Ohrbach for New Yorker Cynthia Peltz. There’s more than a touch of the womb about this room—very comfortable after a hard day at the office …

Text by Joan Prust-Walters.

Photographs by Tim Street Porter.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, January 1974.

Our model Carole Augustine looks very relaxed in Thea Porter’s bathroom which is just like a Seraglio.
Cynthia PeIlls bathroom is a warm hideaway. (Photographed by Harry Hartman).

Tokyo to Tahiti

1970s, harpers and queen, Jaeger, marie helvin, Vintage Adverts
Advert for Jaeger.

Model is Marie Helvin.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, October 1971.

I’ve spread my wings since I discovered Smirnoff

1970s, cosmopolitan, smirnoff, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1974.

19 and Biba are Back in Brown!

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara hulanicki, Barbara Hulanicki, biba, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, Vintage Editorials
Ankle-length brown linen coat and matching trousers, 10gns. Long narrow white silk scarf, 2gns. Brown leather shoes with a bar, £7 10s.

If you want to keep ahead in 1970 you will have something brown and white in your wardrobe. Biba and 19 put their heads together and chose -chocolate brown and stark white as the smartest colours for the spring. Teamed together they make a stunning combination—classic colours cut in that special Biba way to make a head-turning impact. For those in need of something a little bit special to wear at night, take a good look at Biba’s super long satin coat in liquid chocolate brown — designed to be worn over trousers, a dress or just by itself. It’s well worth the money if you go out often enough to warrant an evening coat. Biba goes long again for the spring with a feeling reminiscent of the early 1900s when ladies wore ankle-length skirts,. large picture hats with feathers, plumes and lots of net. We’re in favour of 1970 being a romantic year, and if you agree with us, then Biba’s the shop for you —124-126 Kensington High Street, London, W.8.

Wonderful not only to see Peccinotti’s beautiful photos of Barbara’s beautiful clothes, but a rare and special insight into the lesser-seen Biba number 3 in Kensington High Street (post-Church Street and pre-Derry and Toms). I’m not sure this will ever stop being one of my favourite aesthetics.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, March 1970.

Brown satin evening coat, 12gns. Brown leather bar shoes, £7 10s. Choker, 30s. Scarf from their selection. Veiling, 3s.11d. a yard.
Brown/white Flanestra button-through dress, 6gns. Matching hat, 30s. Brown leather bar shoes, £7 10s. All prices are approximate.
Floor-length white crêpe coat with full sleeves, and matching trousers, 9gns. the set. White crêpe scarf from their selection.
Brown crêpe long fitted jacket with matching buttons, and wide-cut trousers, £5 19s.6d. Matching helmet, 30s. Spectacles, 32s.6d.
White linen suit with an ankle-length skirt, £7 10s. Matching hat, 30s. Beige fishnet tights, 14s.11d. Veiling over face, 3s.11d. a yard.

A Peek at the Boutique: Howie

1970s, Boutiques, british boutique movement, harpers and queen, Howie, Howie Diffusion, Mensday, menswear, Mrs Howie, Steve Campbell

‘Casual clothes for men.’ The phrase used to mean T-shirts and jeans. But since Paul Howie opened his shop at 352 Fulham Road, SW10, the phrase has taken on a new meaning: ‘soft, comfy, easy-to-wear looks; clothes that you can just put on and look good in without trying’. That says it all. Nearly all the clothes are exclusive to Howie, but Paul (in the picture) wears a light brown tie-belted raincoat by Deardon & Fay; £68.

Photographed by Steve Campbell.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, November 1974.