Hong Kong

19 magazine, 1970s, Alan Rodin, alice pollock, antony price, Bata, biba, Inspirational Images, John Bishop, Jolly and Marsh, lilley and skinner, Norma Moriceau, ravel, stirling cooper, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, yves saint laurent
Palest green Dicel satin blouse with glass buttons, £5.25. Apple green circular skirt in silk and rayon mixture, £8.75. Both from Universal Witness. Green tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Red patent shoes from Yves Saint Laurent, £14.

The look is tarty—and where better to go for background atmosphere than Hong Kong, sinful city of the Orient, perfect setting for saucy ladies of ill-repute. In this rich, bustling East/West meeting point, with its maze of colourful streets and endless shops bursting with tax-free jade, pearls and cameras. one gets the feeling that beyond these elegant facades are hidden opium dens, James Bond intrigues, and seamy Suzie Wong bars. We took the ferry across from Kowloon to Hong Kong and travelled to Aberdeen—a small, picturesque harbour inlet filled with over eight thousand junks and sampans, ornate floating restaurants selling delicious, fresh seafood, and crowded local markets.

Styled by Norma Moriceau.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1971.

The styling and clothes in this editorial (I mean, green tights and red platforms? Swoon!) are something close to flawless. Unlike the copy -which I have still posted as a historical document- and also, possibly, the use of local residents as ‘extras’. I occasionally feel the need to clarify that I don’t necessarily endorse all elements of things I post, but I also don’t think it benefits us to completely censor history – especially when one is creating an archive.

Satin print blouse, from Van Der Fransen, £2. Blue cotton skirt with white print and ruffled dipping hem, by Universal Witness, £7.35. Tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Purple leather sandals, from Bata International, £7. Satin shawl with black fringing, from Van Der Fransen, £5.
White sleeveless Dicel satin dress with large blue flower design, by Universal Witness, £14.70. Apple green mock lizard sandals, by Bally, £6-50. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Moss crepe dress by Alice Pollock at Radley, £13.50. Tight by Mary Quant, 75p. Patent wedge sandals by Yves Saint Laurent, £14. Bracelets from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
White crepe dress with moon print and matching shorts by Antony Price at Stirling Cooper, £10. Ankle strap shoes, from Ravel, £5.99.
Cotton jersey halter-neck top and slit skirt in green and yellow floral print, by Alan Rodin, £5. Navy suede laced sandals, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Black Tricel dress with beige print has cap sleeves and sash tie, by Biba, £8.55. Navy sandals with lacings, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Neckklace from a selection at Kensington Market. Rings are model’s own. Flower from Fogg and Wakefield.

2 thoughts on “Hong Kong

  1. I have to say I think these photo shoots are wonderful. I remember many similar, especially in 19 which was my fashion bible. I think the dramatic settings and atmosphere are excellent. I would latch on to the ideas in play, and walk along in Birmingham thinking exotic thoughts of the orient! I am certain the local ” Extras” were fully compliant! I admire your bringing into the present these dreams from the past. X

    1. Thank you for the lovely comment. I have to walk a very fine line with these things. I don’t like to stick my oar in too much, that’s not the point of what I’m doing, and I’m always conscious of being respectful to all involved in creating these amazing images and they don’t need me judging them with my pernickety 2022 hat on (goodness only knows how we’ll be viewed from the same distance). But when I don’t say anything at all, even if it’s just a photoshoot with real fur, I end up with comments from people (who think I can’t see the problems) and I don’t like to feel like I’m on the back foot. I want everyone to feel respected, AND I want to put beautiful archive images out into the world!

      There are countless editorials I have either never posted, or posted from *very* selectively, due to the use of young children from other countries as ‘props’. I know at the time it wasn’t seen as problematic, but it certainly is now! I wouldn’t say I would never post them, but I need to think carefully about how and when I do and be prepared for those conversations.

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