Giving you a hand

19 magazine, 1970s, hand tinting, Inspirational Images, james wedge

A double whammy of surrealist collage and his trademark hand-tinting from the wonderful Mr Wedge, this image accompanied an article about hand and nail care.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, April 1972.

You know how good it feels (Part 2)

19 magazine, 1970s, Austin Garritt, biba, David Anthony, Deco Inspired, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Jane Goddard, janet reger, Simpson of Piccadilly

As promised, the follow up to yesterday’s post featuring a stunning image of all the prizes which were available in this competition. A satin Biba lounging outfit, Janet Reger underwear and a dozen bottles of Laurent Perrier champagne is probably still my idea of covetable luxury!

Modelled by Jane Goddard.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1974.

You know how good it feels (Part 1)

19 magazine, 1970s, art deco, Deco Inspired, Illustrations, Lyn Gray

Magic moments, happy moments, moments alone and moments together—you know how good all that feels. And nothing feels better than that touch of luxury when it comes your way unexpectedly. Just in case you don’t know, we want to prove it, by putting that touch of luxury within your reach. For us, the ‘Thirties, perhaps more than any other era, set the mood for elegance and glamour, and we’ve chosen all our prizes in styles and shades to capture that mood.

A series of eight blissfully brilliant illustrations accompanying a competition feature. There is also a stunning photograph which I will post tomorrow as I thought these deserved their own post.

Illustrations by Lyn Gray.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1974.

Hong Kong

19 magazine, 1970s, Alan Rodin, alice pollock, antony price, Bata, biba, Inspirational Images, John Bishop, Jolly and Marsh, lilley and skinner, Norma Moriceau, ravel, stirling cooper, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, yves saint laurent
Palest green Dicel satin blouse with glass buttons, £5.25. Apple green circular skirt in silk and rayon mixture, £8.75. Both from Universal Witness. Green tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Red patent shoes from Yves Saint Laurent, £14.

The look is tarty—and where better to go for background atmosphere than Hong Kong, sinful city of the Orient, perfect setting for saucy ladies of ill-repute. In this rich, bustling East/West meeting point, with its maze of colourful streets and endless shops bursting with tax-free jade, pearls and cameras. one gets the feeling that beyond these elegant facades are hidden opium dens, James Bond intrigues, and seamy Suzie Wong bars. We took the ferry across from Kowloon to Hong Kong and travelled to Aberdeen—a small, picturesque harbour inlet filled with over eight thousand junks and sampans, ornate floating restaurants selling delicious, fresh seafood, and crowded local markets.

Styled by Norma Moriceau.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1971.

The styling and clothes in this editorial (I mean, green tights and red platforms? Swoon!) are something close to flawless. Unlike the copy -which I have still posted as a historical document- and also, possibly, the use of local residents as ‘extras’. I occasionally feel the need to clarify that I don’t necessarily endorse all elements of things I post, but I also don’t think it benefits us to completely censor history – especially when one is creating an archive.

Satin print blouse, from Van Der Fransen, £2. Blue cotton skirt with white print and ruffled dipping hem, by Universal Witness, £7.35. Tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Purple leather sandals, from Bata International, £7. Satin shawl with black fringing, from Van Der Fransen, £5.
White sleeveless Dicel satin dress with large blue flower design, by Universal Witness, £14.70. Apple green mock lizard sandals, by Bally, £6-50. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Moss crepe dress by Alice Pollock at Radley, £13.50. Tight by Mary Quant, 75p. Patent wedge sandals by Yves Saint Laurent, £14. Bracelets from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
White crepe dress with moon print and matching shorts by Antony Price at Stirling Cooper, £10. Ankle strap shoes, from Ravel, £5.99.
Cotton jersey halter-neck top and slit skirt in green and yellow floral print, by Alan Rodin, £5. Navy suede laced sandals, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Black Tricel dress with beige print has cap sleeves and sash tie, by Biba, £8.55. Navy sandals with lacings, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Neckklace from a selection at Kensington Market. Rings are model’s own. Flower from Fogg and Wakefield.

Boots care for hair. Colourfully.

19 magazine, 1970s, Boots, Inspirational Images, platforms, Vintage Adverts
The Boots Electrical Beauty range is just about the prettiest you’ll find anywhere. Hairdryers, heated hair rollers and lady shavers in spring-time colours like Lilac, Soft Lavender, Peach, Cream and lots more. Another thing you’ll find is that all these lovely things cost a lot less than other popular makes. But that’s what you expect from Boots products isn’t it? The Boots Beauty Care range. The prettiest things , to make you look your prettiest.

I’m not sure it gets much more 1973 than the styling here. Almost worthy of a Roxy Music cover. In fact, it wouldn’t surprise me if it was consciously or subconsciously influenced by that.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1973.

City Slickers

19 magazine, 1970s, Antiquarius, Baggage and General, biba, bus stop, clobber, Deco Inspired, Elgee, erica budd, Feathers, gladrags, hollywood clothes shop, Inspirational Images, Jasper, Jean Charles Brosseau, jeff banks, lee bender, Michael Berkofsky, Norma Moriceau, ravel, Shubette, Simon Ellis, Sue Baloo, Sunarama, The Purple Shop, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, wallis
Felt hat. by Jean-Charles Brosseau from Feathers, £5.75 (£5 15s.). Crêpe shirt. by Jeff Banks. £6.30 (6gns.). Natural calico blazer has yellow braid edging and matching shorts, by Wallis, £7.95 (£7 19s.). Tights, by Mary Quant, 75p. (15s.). Artificial flowers from a selection at John Lewis. Photographed at the Purple Shop, Antiquarius, 153 Kings Road, London, S.W.3.

Yves St. Laurent’s ‘Blast From The Past’ award is taken by the blazer. Fashioned a la Dietrich, casual but smart, it looks especially good with shorts, hot-coloured tights and long knee-socks, or pleated skirts. The best choice is plain white, black or red; or hot checks and stripes.

A superb editorial, giving us an insight into the short-lived but legendary Hollywood Clothes Shop and The Purple Shop in Antiquarius (which I feel like I’m regularly crediting in other posts on here) and also designer David Mellor’s shop. It also has the unusual element of every price being given in new and old money – with decimalisation having been introduced in February of the same year. I’m surprised I don’t see this a lot more in editorials from 1971.

Modelled by Sue Baloo

Styled by Norma Moriceau.

Photographed by Michael Berkofsky.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, May 1971.

Denim hat, by Jean-Charles Brosseau from Feathers, £6. Cotton shirt in browns and blues, by Jasper, £4.48 (89s.7d.). ‘Forties’ rayon hopsack blazer, double-breasted with Square padded shoulders and two large pockets, matching shorts with turn-ups (sold as a three-piece with trousers), by Shubette, £13.95 (£13 19s.). Green tights, by Mary Quant, 75p. (15s.). White Orlon socks, by Sunarama, 59p. (11s.10d.). Blue mules with white thonging, by Ravel, £3.75 (75s.). Pretend watch-brooch from Universal Witness, 50p. (10s.). Photographed outside Green’s of Chelsea, fruiterer and florist.
Brown felt hat, by Jean-Charles Brosseau from Feathers, £5.75 (£5 15s.). Canary yellow cotton jersey shirt, £3.20 (64s.). Multi-coloured random striped cotton jersey vest, £1.38 (27s.7d.). Both by Erica Budd. Wine jersey blazer edged in turquoise, with turquoise shorts, by Clobber, £10. Blue over-the-knee socks, from Fenwicks, 50p. (10s.). Doggie brooch, from Universal Witness, 50p. (10s.). Ribbon on hat, from a selection at John Lewis. Photographed at the Hollywood Clothes Shop.
Felt hat by Feathers, £5.75 (£5 15s) Red jersey shirt with elasticised waist, £5.95 (£5 19s). Navy knitted cotton vest with red trim, £1.75 (35s). Madras cotton blazer, £9.50 (£9 10s). Shorts, £4.45 (£4 9s). All by Lee Bender for Bus Stop. Tights by Mary Quant, 75p (15s). Peep-toes by Ravel, £5.99 (£5 19s 10d).
Straw hat, from Biba, £1.25 (25s.). Spotted cotton voile shirt in red, yellow, blue and green, by Simon Ellis, £4.25 (85s.). Single-breasted blazer and shorts suit in black givreine, from Biba, £9.75 (£9 15s.). Sheer black tights, from Biba, 54 ½p. (10s.11d.). Crêpe scarf, from Biba, £2. Artificial flowers, from Biba, £1.05 (1gn.). Photographed at David Mellor, Ironmonger, London, S.W.1.
Brown felt hat, from Feathers, £5.75 (£5 15s.). Cotton oatmeal shirt, by Jasper, £3.98 (79s.7d.). Checked waistcoat in shades of tan with rust stripes, £5.25 (5gns.). Shorts, £5.25 (5gns.). Matching single-breasted tan blazer in washable Telenka with flap patch-pockets and belt, £10. All by Gladrags. Brown tights, by Mary Quant, 75p. (15s.). Long rust socks, from Feathers, £1.50 (30s.). Suede wedge shoes, by Ravel, £4.50 (90s.). Bright green satchel, by Baggage and General Holding Co. Ltd., £1.50 (30s.).
Denim hat, by Jean-Charles Brosseau from Feathers, £6. Spotted blouse, from a selec-tion at Van Der Fransen. Single-breasted rayon blazer suit by Elgee, jacket in blue and beige checks on white has padded shoulders and flap pockets, and comes with either plain white or matching shorts, 2_15.75 (15anq Navy tights, by Mary Quant, 75p. (15s.). White Orlon over-the-knee socks, by Sunarama, 59p. (11s.10d.). Navy mules, from Ravel, £3.75 (75s.). Pretend watch-brooch from Universal Witness, 50p. (10s.). Photographed at Parsons, Fulham Road, London, S.W.10.
Navy denim hat, by Jean-Charles Brosseau from Feathers, £5.75 (£5 15s.). Red cotton jersey shirt, £5.95 (£5 19s.). Red, navy and white jersey vest with side button fastening, £2.50 (50s.). White bonded jersey blazer, £7. Navy jersey shorts, £3.75 (75s.). All by Lee Bender for Bus Stop. Navy socks, from Fenwicks, 50p. (10s.). White sandals with cork soles from Ravel, £4.50 (90s.).

Beauty from Biba

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara hulanicki, Barbara Hulanicki, beauty, biba, british boutique movement, hair, Hair and make-up, Make-up

As with everything Biba creates, its newly opened Beauty Parlour in the Kensington store hits that striking note of sparkling originality.

It has 19’s stamp of approval. because it is a genuine beauty parlour, in the true, old-fashioned sense of the word. The Parlour welcomes you into a relaxed, spacious and luxurious, ‘Thirties’ world of cream and black decor, bedecked with dark green palms. It is the brain-child of Barbara Hulaniki— Biba’s creator—and Regis, a brilliant and inventive make-up artist and hairdresser.

Before Regis showed us around, we asked him to tell us about his past.

Looking every bit as dashing as Valentino himself. he said: “Call me a man with no past. Although I trained and worked in many leading salons, I don’t want to be attached to anything I’ve done before or The Parlour to be compared with others.”

The Parlour offers the services of a modern establishment (from haircutting to leg waxing) which it executes in a novel way. Here you are not a number with a gown—you are treated as an individual with individual needs. In true Biba tradition, on arrival, you are fitted out with a fabulous gown—either a long black satin one (if you are having your hair done), a black velour robe (for the guys) or a super black towelling robe (if you are going into the beauty room). Even the hair nets are pretty— black and silky.


The seating is so cleverly designed in the curved and pillared room that one client hardly sees another and, although each hairdresser—and there are three, plus Regis— has his own ‘corner’, all the involved treatments, such as tinting, bleaching, high-lighting and perming. are done in private cubicles.

Biba carries every conceivable shade of hair colouring and hasn’t just confined The Parlour to all the well-known branded names. Regis virtually combed the earth to find special formulas and effects.

Henna treatments are very popular and Biba uses several varieties—Black Henna, for dark heads; Neutral Henna, for blondes; Henna Wax for dry, split hair; ordinary henna, for a rich, red glow and a special henna, which can be used with a perm—normally you cannot perm hair which has henna on it. (Henna treatment costs from £6: tinting from £6.50; perming from £10.) Regis has fixed ideas concerning shampoo.

“A good shampoo is the most important step in the whole process. because if you use a bad one. then you can forget about doing an original style. Dull, horrible hair can never look good, however hard you try.”

Biba has 17 kinds of shampoo to choose from, ranging from ‘Almond’ and ‘Strawberry’ to ‘Henna Gloss’ shampoo, which doesn’t actually colour the hair but, with constant use, produces marvellous red lights. There are also three biological shampoos: one for greasy hair, one for dry and one for dandruff sufferers. (A shampoo and set costs £3, no matter which shampoo you need to use.)

Other Biba specialities are the after-washing, pre-setting goodies. Regis’ favourite is the Champagne Rinse, which gives a remarkable gloss and softness. The Henna Conditioner is good and there are Frictions, too, which are spirit-based hair perfumes, to make your hair smell beautiful, as well as look good. (Frictions are something mothers and grandmothers know all about. but which had disappeared from our lives—until now.) These cost 50p. each, and you can choose from ‘Orchid’, `Fougere., ‘Eau de Cologne’, ‘Passionate’ and ‘Gardenia’.


Blow-drying is virtually non-existent at Biba.

“We want girls to look truly groomed and feminine again.” said Regis. He believes in the old-style training and he and his staff use rollers (but not heated ones), Marcel Wave tongs, wave clips. small tongs and irons, and do lots of exacting pin-curling.


The Beauty Room is run by a very efficient lady and practically anything is done. There are treatments to help acne problems; waxing to remove unwanted hair; massage including a deep-back massage. with an infra-red lamp; spot reducing with Slendertone and eye treatments, which include eyebrow shaping, eyelash dyeing and the application of Permanent lashes. (This costs £4. and replacements later on cost 10p. a lash.)

The manicures and pedicures are superb. If it is just a plain one you want, then, of course, they will oblige. But if you want something for a special occasion then they can do fantastic combinations of colours, patterns and designs on nails and toes, too, if required. (Ordinary manicures cost £1: the special kind. £2.50.)

As far as make-up is concerned. Regis will create a fantastic new look for you and will advise on form-ulas, colours and applica-tion. (Cost £5.)

The Parlour opens at 11am., on weekdays, and last appointments are at 6.30pm. On Saturdays. opening time is 9.30am. and last appointments are at 4pm.

It’s sobering to remember that about seven months after this article appeared, Biba was closed forever.

Photographer(s) uncredited.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, February 1975.

Candy Floss Colours

19 magazine, 1970s, Boots Seventeen, Hair and make-up, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

I can only hope that the newly relaunched Boots Seventeen range will be as much fun as it looks like it was back in the Seventies!

Scanned from 19 Magazine, April 1973.

Simply Sweet

19 magazine, 1970s, Anne Cossins, Annie Cossins, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, John Carter, John Craig, louis caring, Ricci Burns, Sharcleod, susan marsh, Vintage Editorials
Blue angora and lambswool long-sleeved sweater with pink, white and mauve flowers embroidered on yoke, by Sharcleod, £4. Plastic bracelets from a selection at Biba, 15p. each.

If you haven’t got that special natural sweetness that makes people put a protective arm around you, don’t worry; it’s available this spring for under a fiver. Slip into these pastel pretties and discover the joys of being a choc-box dolly.

Photographed by John Carter.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, February 1973.

TOP: Short-sleeved wool sweater with shawl collar and yoke in pink, yellow and cream stripes, pink and yellow diagonally striped sleeves and spotted body, by Annie Cossins, £4.95. Blue plastic stretch bracelet, by Paul Stephens, 40p. Pink flower earrings, by Corocraft, 59p. BELOW: Short-sleeved wool sweater, with pink and yellow striped yoke, cream and pink spotted sleeves and pink, yellow and cream body, by Annie Cossins, £4.95. Pink plastic beads, 70p. Blue plastic bangles, 18p. each. Both by Paul Stephens.
White angora and lambswool halter-neck sweater, with pink, blue and yellow flowers embroidered on yoke, £3.75. Matching cardigan with two pockets embroidered with pastel flowers, £5. Both by Sharcleod. Pink fwer necklace from a selection at Susan Marsh at Chelsea Antique Market. Enamel bangles, 20p. each. Enamel ring, 15p. All by Paul Stephens.
TOP: Pink acrylic sweater with crocheted shawl collar and three-buttoned front, by John Craig, £4. Pink flower earrings, by Corocraft, 69p. Pink plastic pearl necklace, by Paul Stephens, 90p. White angora and lambswool long-sleeved sweater, with pink embroidered flower motif in centre and two pink stripes on sleeves, by Louis Caring, £4-25. Pink plastic pearl necklace, by Paul Stephens, 90p. BOTTOM: Green acetate long-sleeved shirt, by Jeff Banks, £6. Lilac angora and lambswool bolero, with blue, pink and green flowers on either side of opening, by Sharcleod, Green cotton shirt with red and green floral pattern, by Jeff Banks, .£6.40. Green angora and lambswool short-sleeved sweater with yellow, pink and blue embroidered flowers on yoke, by Sharcleod, £4. Green and pink plastic bangles, by Paul Stephens, 18p. each.

With Reference To The Past

19 magazine, 1970s, Browns, cacharel, coopers, Crochetta, Deco Inspired, edward mann, erica budd, gillian richard, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, Ku Khanh, lord john, Norma Moriceau, Riva, Sheilagh Browne, sheridan barnett, terry de havilland, tuttabankem, Twomax, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, Virginia, Vivienne Lynn
Rust-coloured felt hat with rose trimming from a selection at Van Der Fransen. French Dresden blue shirt with pink and lilac floral print, by Jeff Banks, £6.50. Grey boucle cardigan with short puff sleeves and front fastening, by Crochetta, £6.50. Pale blue circular barathea skirt, by Sheilagh Brown at Coopers, £12. Scarf by Herbert Johnson, £3-15. Green straw hat with rose trimming, from Universal Witness, £5. Blue sweater with long sleeves and round neck, £2.45. Matching short-sleeved cardigan with wrap-over front, £3.45. Both by Erica Budd. Grey crepe Oxford bags with pleated front, by Tuttabankem, £17-50.

Ten years ago, the British woman was bound to her cardigan. Then, in a feverish review of fashion, the cardigan was shelved for the jacket. Now, it’s back in circulation, not as the rather insipid number of yesteryear, but renewed in a long wrap-around version — the sort you cuddle into when it’s cold outside, the sort you wear over dresses, jeans or even suits. Cardigans like this are the most practical knitwear created for ages and the Paris Collections, if they spell excitement to you, were full of them.

All jewellery in feature from a selection at Marie Middleton and Susan Marsh at Chelsea Antique Market. Gold-rimmed glasses from any good optician.

Modelled by Vivienne Lynn and unknown model.

Styling by Norma Moriceau.

Photographed by Ku Khanh.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, January 1973.

Dark green straw hat with pink velvet trim, from Universal Witness, £5. Pale green fine cotton shirt with floral printed pattern, by Cacharel at Browns, £7. Cream bouclé short-sleeved cardigan with very thin stripes, by Crochetta, £8. Pale green straw hat with green velvet trim, from Universal Witness, £5. Pale yellow fine cotton shirt with floral printed pattern, by Cacharel at Browns, £7. Yellow cardigan with two pockets on hips, by Twomax, £4.50.
Sweater and matching cardigan in blue tweed mixture with beige and brown trims, from Upstairs at Lord John, £25 the set. Camel barathea skirt with full front flap, by Sheridan Barnett at Coopers, £11.95. White shirt with black and yellow floral print, by Riva, £4-95. Grey cardigan with yellow stripe, by Virginia, £14. Grey wrap-over barathea skirt with pockets on hips, by Sheridan Barnett at Coopers, £11-95. Navy blue bag, from Biba, £5.85.
Green straw hat with pink velvet trim, from Universal Witness, £5. Pale blue flower-printed sleeveless blouse with cowl neck, £4. Brown flowered crepe skirt, £6. Both from Van Der Fransen. Pink wool and angora cardigan, by Crochetta, £10. Pale green straw hat with green velvet trim, £5. Cream and brown printed short-sleeved blouse with two breast pockets, matching skirt with elasticated waistband, £11.60 the set. All by Universal Witness. Green wool and angora cardigan with ribbed waistband, by Crochetta, £10.
Brown felt pull-on hat with large brim, by Edward Mann, £2.90. Pink and violet print blouse with cape collar, by Van Der Fransen, £4. Long cream boucle cardigan with hip pockets and tie belt, by Crochetta, £13. Black jersey skirt, by Spectrum, £6.50. Black and white lace-up ankle boots, by Terry de Haviland, £15.99. Wool gloves, by Morley, 72p. Grey felt pull-on hat with large brim, by Edward Mann, £2.90. Blue and white spotted sleeveless blouse, with cowl collar, by Van Der Fransen, £4. Long white ribbed cardigan with hip pockets, by Twomax, £7.50. Long grey gored skirt, by Spectrum, £6.50. Black wool gloves from a selection at Browns.
Black cotton shirt with floral print, by Cacharel at Browns, £7. Camel cardigan with V-neck and thin white stripes, by Virginia, £15. Black jersey gored skirt, by Spectrum, £6.50. Cream jersey dress with scalloped Peter Pan collar, by Gillian Richard, £9.80. Long navy blue cardigan with round neck, by McCaul, £4. Navy blue bag, from Biba, £5.85.