Biba Cosmetics

1970s, biba, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

Sorry for the protracted absence over the past month. I realise I’m not the only one, but I have been experiencing serious fatigue from the events of the past year and I think the loss of Diana Rigg was some kind of final straw for me. I could see I was almost at the point of burning out and decided to take my foot off the pedal for a bit. But I get itchy fingers if I don’t scan for a while so I am gently starting up again, although it’s unlikely to be the same frequency as before. I’ve enjoyed the downtime too much and need to be careful with my mental health – as do we all!

I hope you’re all hanging in there ok, and that at the very least my archive has been of some distraction and enjoyment to you.

Biba cosmetics advert scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Necking

1970s, biba, Chester Martin, christa peters, Honey Magazine, ika hindley, Inspirational Images, Jacqmar, Jasper, jeff banks, John Dove and Molly White, novelty prints, Ronnie Stirling, stirling cooper, Turnbull & Asser, Vintage Editorials
Hollywood film star printed cotton satin shirt by John Dove and Molly White for Jasper. Pure silk herringbone tie by Turnbull and Asser.

These are the ties that go with the shirts that are all part of the big 40s revival. Floppy silky shirts with subtly embossed patterns, and ties and scarves galore; they can be tied in bows, pinned with brooches, loosely knotted or worn like the men do. In fact, as long as they trail elegantly down the front of your shirt you can wear these ties just any way you like.

As a dedicated fan of long silk scarves (and silky blouses, and novelty brooches in fact) I’m just taking this editorial as my one stop guide to getting dressed this autumn.

Photographed by Christa Peters.

Possibly modelled by Ika Hindley (it looks like her mouth).

Scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Striped embossed crepe de chine blouse by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Paisley silk scarf by Chester Martin. Cicada brooch from Biba.
Feathers crepe de chine blouse by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Long spotted silk scarf by Chester Martin.
Avocado green crepe de chine blouse with fern pattern by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Silk chevron kipper tie by Turnbull and Asser. Egyptian stock pin from Biba.
Wavy patterned jacquard shirt by Jeff Banks. Printed silk scarf by Chester Martin. Sea horse brooch from Biba.
Flower embossed chocolate brown jacquard shirt by Jeff Banks. Long silk art deco scarf by Jacqmar. Flying eagle brooch from Biba.

Anarchists go their own sweet way

alice pollock, beauty, biba, gala, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Jill Harley, kari ann muller, Make-up, Steve Hiett

They break boring beauty traditions and riot lip colours go on eyes, eye colours go on lips. Upside down- Quite contrary. And why not? Make-up was getting so dreary. We just stuck to the rules and slicked warm colours—pink, amber, soft orange—on our mouths, and cool colours—grey, green, blue, brown—on our eyes. Till now. Till the anarchists started this new groove. Now things are happening. Putting on a face isn’t a daily chore to be done as quickly as possible. Make-up is something to enjoy. It’s art. Total fun. Total fantasy. After all, painting on warm mobile skin is so much more exciting than .cold fiat paper or canvas. Come, join the anarchy party and experiment with colour. Sit down this evening in front of a well-lit mirror, not the telly, and design surprise eyes.

Alice Pollock (top) says she would like to be invisible (can’t think why) and her favourite perfume is Chanel No. 5. She has tried every hair colour under the sun, including green, but she’s glad it’s her own shade now—”At least I know who I am when I wake up.” Every morning she washes it in the bath with Boots Herbal Shampoo, 2s. 11d. On her eye-lids she paints Leichner’s Ivory Stick No. 5, 5s. 3d., and then an arc of pale green under the brow and round along the cheek-bone. Her lip-colour is a mixture of the same Leichner stick and Christian Dior’s Sepia 61 lipstick, 15s.


Moon (centre left, whose real name is Constance Mullens and who was nicknamed after a South African cartoon character called Moon Mullens) wears Mary Quant’s Citrus Jeepers Peepers, 18s. 7d., on her eye-lids and a purple Caran D’ache water crayon all round the eyes to tone with her hair which is cleverly coloured mauve and butterscotch by Erik and styled by Herta at Vidal Sassoon, Grosvenor House; 01-629 2463. Her favourite perfume is jasmin and, asked what the most vital beauty product is, she said, “a razor.”


Gala Mitchell (centre right) is a beautifully original actress. You may have seen her before in Ken Russell’s television film about the Pre-Raphaelites. Her most treasured beauty product is lipstick. Here she’s wearing Biba’s purple lip-tint, 5s., with black liner round her mouth. She uses more of Revlon’s Natural Wonder Lid Liners, 17s. 6d., to paint intriguing black spots across part of her face to symbolise a veil, and then twists a string of blue curls, tinted by Erik, amongst her copper hair which she keeps in place with two ’40s tortoiseshell hair-combs.


Kari Ann Moller (bottom left) says she wants to look like the wicked witch in fairy tales, yet she loves cosy perfumes like Apple Blossom and Lily of the Valley (Coty’s Muguet des Bois Creamy Skin Parfum, 17s. 6d.), and she couldn’t live without Nivea. “I found an old purple crayon in my boyfriend’s car—he’s a painter—so I’m wearing purple with a dab of lipstick and Leichner silver sparklers on my eyes today, plus tart red lipstick by Elizabeth Arden.” Her soft ginger wig is by Ricci Burns, 151 Kings Rd., S.W.3.


Jill Harley (bottom right) never wears fake eyelashes now, she’s only interested in colour: Chrome stick by Leichner.. 5s. 3d., with Gait orange paint near the socket line and Dorothy Gray’s Light-Up Yellow lipstick, 11s. 6d., as a highlighter for her eyes. Woltz ltaliana’s pale green polish, Laguna, goes on her nails to match up with her pale green wellingtons. Instead of expensive face-shapers, she brushes on Miners’ Frosted Brown Powder Eye Shadow, 2s. 10d. For her lips, she mixes an old red lipstick with Boots 17 Shiny Brown Eye Shadow Stick, 2s. 6d.

Two of my favourite models + one of my favourite designers + some wild 1970 make-up = happy Liz.

Photographed by Steve Hiett.

Scanned from Honey, September 1970.

Summer at Source

1970s, biba, celia birtwell, Emmanuelle Khanh, gerald mccann, Herbert Johnson, ingrid boulting, Inspirational Images, norman parkinson, ossie clark, Suliman, Vintage Editorials, Vogue
Tiger lily silk dress 31gns at Biba.

Following Gaudi’s thought “to be original, return to the origin”, following it down to Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire where William Fox Talbot invented the camera, Norman Parkinson photographed eight dresses conjured from pure air and gauze.

This is like an album where every song is a certified banger. From the model, to the frocks, to the photographer, to the photographer he’s referencing, everything is flawless. Except that I don’t own all these dresses.

Photographed by Norman Parkinson.

Modelled by Ingrid Boulting.

Photographed at Lacock Abbey.

Scanned from Vogue, July 1970.

Silk gauze in pale straw with green and mauve. By Ossie Clark, Celia Birtwell print, about 25gns.
Silk chiffon dress in Celia Birtwell print by Ossie Clark, £40. Cap at Herbert Johnson.
Flower garden dress of crisp muslin. By Gerald McCann, £16 5s. 6d.
Black printed Indian cotton dress 10gns at Suliman.
Blackberry on black Indian cotton dress by Gerald McCann, £16 5s. 6d.
Silk chiffon dress in Celia Birtwell print by Ossie Clark, £40.
Fish finned cotton dress by Emmanuelle Khanh, about £30 to order.

How Original!

19 magazine, 1970s, Antiquarius, biba, british boutique movement, Chelsea Antiques Market, Christian Larroque, Emmerton and Lambert, Essences, Essenses, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, jenny kee, MEE Designs, Ricci Burns, Sacha, susan marsh, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials

In this age of mass-production, finding clothes that have an individual look is becoming more and more difficult. But a few enterprising minds in London have got round the problem by buying old clothes, in beautiful prints that one doesn’t see these days, and remaking them in today’s styles. Though the styles are repeated, the materials are different and each garment is quite unique. If you don’t live in London, don’t despair. Look around for a clever seamstress who can copy the styles for you. Then, it’s a matter of combing jumble sales, or looking among granny’s cast-offs, for unusual prints. Don’t, however, cut up clothes in good condition. You’ll get a good price for these in London markets. And if you do come to London, go round the markets instead of the stores and boutiques – there’s a lot to be picked up!

An extraordinarily styled and photographed editorial featuring Van der Fransen, Emmerton and Lambert and Essences, all of whom were trailblazers in the world of vintage and recycled fashion.

This shoot also manages to answer two of my most frequently asked questions: what is your favourite editorial and what do you think the future of fashion will be. The former is probably a moveable feast, although this one is definitely up there with my other favourite, but the latter is still something I believe strongly. Especially in a post-pandemic landscape, I am not sure (and definitely hopeful) that we will ever see the same levels of mass production post-2020. Not for want of desire by the high street shops, but because people have maybe recognised that, actually, they don’t need armfuls of cheap synthetic, single-use garments. Perhaps the aesthetics and principles of these recyclers of the Sixties and Seventies will finally be adopted as our default? We could stop producing new clothes and fabrics right now and probably never reach the end of the piles of recyclable materials. And that’s not even taking wearable vintage garments into account. Do you feel your shopping habits have changed permanently?

Red wig by Robert at Ricci Burns.

Photographed by Christian Larroque.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1972.

Beautiful old sun dress in rayon crepe and silk from Van der Fransen. Tights and shoes from Biba.
Navy and white smock in various prints of rayon crepe and skirt both by Van der Fransen. Tights and shoes by Biba.
Intricate patchwork dress and long skirt from Emmerton and Lambert. Green tights and mauve shoes from Biba.
Jenny Kee of Emmerton and Lambert at Chelsea Antique Market, wearing a Chinese kimono and trousers from a selection at Emmerton and Lambert. Model wears a blouse made up of old scarves in satin and silk from a selection at Emmerton and Lambert. Gingham shoes from Biba. Photographed at The Terrace Cafe, Chelsea Antique Market.
Slinky cross cut dress in various printed crepes and crepes de Chine from Essences. Blue tights and mauve shoes both from Biba. Scarf from Essences.
Patchwork dress of old printed fabrics from a selection at Emmerton and Lambert. Tights and gingham shoes from Biba. Plastic dragonfly at neck from Susan Marsh.
Spotted two piece from Essences. Tights from Biba. Shoes from Sacha. Lovely old shawl from Essences.
Navy blue and white print smock with contrasting sleeves by MEE Designs. Jeans from Browns. Clogs by Sacha. Photographed at MEE Designs at Antiquarius.
White satin Twenties style dress by MEE Designs at Antiquarius. Tights and shoes from Biba.

Peasant in the Sun

1970s, Bata, Bermona, biba, Britannia Land of Plenty, Buckle Under, chelsea cobbler, clobber, Diane Logan, Elliott, hampstead bazaar, Inca, laura ashley, Marielle, mary quant, miss mouse, Pamela Dennis, petticoat magazine, rae spencer cullen, ravel, Richard Green, Roger Charity, Russell & Bromley, Souk, Splinters, Sue Hone, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials
Mary Quant pinny worn over cheesecloth dress at The Souk. Britannia Land of Plenty silver armband. Buckle Under hat. Ravel shoes / Cheese cloth shirt and matching skirt by Richard Green. Woolworths hairnet. Buckle Under hat. Russell and Bromley shoes.

Summer’s peasant clothes come in brightly frilled cotton or in soft layers of cheesecloth with a bazaar of sunny straws and beads.

Fashion by Sue Hone.

Photographed by Roger Charity.

Scanned from Petticoat, 6th June 1972.

Souk pinny. Calico shirt with starry ribbon trim from Splinters. / Embroidered smock at Inca. Richard Green cheesecloth skirt. Waistcoat from Inca. Ravel suede sandals.
Miss Mouse seeksucker dress. Diane Logan boater. Biba false flowers. / Miss Mouse gingham dress. Bermona straw boater. Chelsea Cobbler wedge sandals.
Embroidered dress by Souk. Buckle Under Bowler. Britannia Land of Plenty shoulder bag. Elliotts sandals. / Midi skirt and cheesecloth dress at Souk. Inca wool belt. Buckle Under crochet cap. Bata sandals.
Long embroidered skirt with gathered waist from Hampstead Bazaar. Cheesecloth top by Clobber. Embroidered beret from Britannia Land of Plenty. Elliotts sandals. Straw bag from Inca. / Long checked cheesecloth dress by Marielle. Glass flower brooch from Van der Fransen.
Laura Ashley skirt. Calico smock by Pamela Dennis. Forbidden Fruit belt. / Laura Ashley top and skirt. Silk shawl from Britannia Land of Plenty. Shoes by Ravel.

Romantic Revival

1970s, anello and davide, biba, Brosseau, bus stop, catherine buckley, charlotte martin, Feathers, Harri Peccinotti, Hope and Eleanor, Inspirational Images, Jean Charles Brosseau, lee bender, Mouche (model), ravel, The Purple Shop, Tony Berkeley, Tony Berkley, Vintage Editorials
Tawny shades of hazel and honey: Brown cloche hat, veiling, long brown and white cotton dress all from Biba. Shell ring from Hope and Eleanor. / Long brown and white cotton voile dress from Biba. Large brown crochet shawl by Catherine Buckley. Heart shaped ring from Hope and Eleanor.

Spring has taken on a romantic air – with light dresses, billowing skirts and full sleeves. The fabric for day is cotton, especially voile. For evening, crepe is a great favourite. The lines are seductive – wear low v-necks, hats with lots of veiling and an antique brooch. Find an old shawl or crochet your own. If you’ve time to hunt you needn’t spend much money.

Some of my favourite designers, my favourite looks, one of my favourite photographers and two of my favourite models: Charlotte Martin and Mouche. Perfection.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, April 1970.

Old Fashioned Prints in Pink and White: All clothes from Biba. Ivory brooch from The Purple Shop.
Caviar and Champagne dresses: Hats from J. C. Brosseau from Feathers. Veiling from Biba. Dresses by Tony Berkeley. Beige shoes found by our model in a junk shop.
Melange of navy, white and pink: Crochet hat from J. C. Brosseau. Short navy crepe dress from Tony Berkeley. Shoes from Ravel. Brooch and ring from The Purple Shop.
Art deco revived: Silvery lace hat from Feathers. Dress and coat by Lee Bender for Bus Stop. Black patent shoes from Ravel. / Beige lace pull on hat from Biba. Dress by Lee Bender for Bus Stop. Red leather shoes by Anello and Davide. Beads from Hope and Eleanor. Brooch from The Purple Shop.
Interludes of brown and white crepe: Hat from Biba. Dress by Tony Berkeley. / Hat from Feathers. Dress by Tony Berkeley. Both shoes by Ravel.
Burgundy wool suit from Bus Stop. Leather gloves from Biba. Leather and suede boots by Anello and Davide. / Burgundy wool trousersuit and hat from Biba. Boots by Anello and Davide.
Romantic white afternoon dresses: Dresses by Louis Caring. Hats from Biba and J. C Brosseau. Scarf from Emmerton and Lambert.
Nuances of delicate navy and white: Hat by J. C. Brosseau. Dress by Tony Berkeley.

What’s On!

1970s, biba, brighton, Browns, carr jones, che guevara, chelsea cobbler, Derber, Elliott, gordon king, Harrods, Inspirational Images, liberty, liberty's, margit brandt, Nik Nik, petticoat magazine, Sally Tuffin, shoes, Tony Norris, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, way in
Nik Nik cotton shorts. Cotton top with ribbed waist and cuffs by Nik Nik. Biba belt. Shoes by Chelsea Cobbler at Che Guevara. / Nik Nik shirt. Canvas cut off pants by Nik Nik. See through Derber shoes. All Nik Nik clothes are exclusive to Way In, Harrods.

When you think you’ve seen all there is to see about separates, spring turns around and finds a whole new way of doing things! What’s on now? Cotton and cord going to any lengths with pants… soft lawn with tiny prints for shirting and some of the very newest skirts. And we’re giving you ideas about what spring’s all about!

Always lovely to see the West Pier here in Brighton, in all its glory two years before its closure in 1975. For those not familiar with it, the West Pier has had a very sad and protracted demise since then and only the skeleton remains, stranded out at sea. Thankfully, its prettier heyday was well-documented on film and in shoots like this.

Photographed by Tony Norris.

Scanned from Petticoat, 10th March 1973.

Cotton shirt by Nik Nik. Cord boy-scout shorts by Gordon King. Biba scarf. Biba shoes. / Cheesecloth shirt by Nik Nik. Cotton drainpipe pants by Sally Tuffin. Shoes at Che Guevara.
Cape-sleeved rever shirt by Margit Brandt at Carr Jones. Cotton cut-off pants by Nik Nik. Scarf by Van der Fransen. Paul Stephens bracelet. Elliott lace-up shoes. / Left Bank cotton top at Garb. Gordon King pants. Biba bracelet and brooch. Derber shoes.
Cotton smock by Tabu. Canvas pants by Nik Nik. Derber shoes. / Liberty print shirt and Sally Tuffin pants at Browns. Patent slingbacks by Chelsea Cobbler at Che Guevara.
Margit Brandt at Carr Jones shirt. Paul Stephens bangle / Skirt and jersey shirt by Nik Nik. Van der Fransen earrings.
Cheesecloth shirt with zip front by Nik Nik. Pencil skirt by Gordon King. Biba hairslie. High heels with piping by Chelsea Cobbler at Che Guevara. / Cotton smock by Tabu. Check wool plus fours by Gordon King. Scarf by Van der Fransen. Two-tone court shoes by Chelsea Cobbler at Che Guevara.

Aquaphilia (Part 1)

1970s, biba, Dorothy Perkins, Gossard, hans feurer, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Kayser, kensington market, lingerie, Lovable, Marks and Spencer, mary quant, Sunarama, Twilfit, underwear, Vintage Editorials
‘Next to nothing’ nylon bra by Twilfit. Black lycra pntie girdle by Dorothy Perkins. Sheer smoky stockings by Mary Quant. / Black and white nylon stretch boxer briefs from Marks and Spencer.

We know a girl… who can’t last the day without lashings of spray. We know a girl… who gets quite high on a bucket of tide. We know a girl… who gets no elation from dusty dehydration. We know a girl… who gets all her kicks from aquatic dips. We know a girl… who can’t get enough of that H20 stuff. We know a girl… who’s got pneumonia.

Stunning editorial shot by Hans Feurer in two parts, half waterproof outerwear and half delicious underwear. Waterproofs next time…

Photographed by Hans Feurer in the Canary Islands.

Scanned from Honey, February 1970.

Light white cut out nylon mini slip from Dorothy Perkins. / Coin spotted camisole bra with matching tricot and lycra porthole-design pantie girdle, both by Lovable. Stockings by Sunarama.
Soft Celon criss cross plunge line bra by Gossard. Pantie girdle by Kayser. Stockings by Sunarama.
Transparent nylon and lycra bra and pantie girdle both from Marks and Spencer. Copper stockings from Sunarama. Pearls from Kensington Market.
Chestnut and cream flared mini slip with see through midriff by Kayser. / Shiny wet look bra slip by Dorothy Perkins.
White cobweb nylon and cotton lace chemise slip by Biba. Pearls from Kensington Market.

All Night Long

1970s, Bata, biba, bus stop, Esme Young, francois lamy, gillian richard, Honey Magazine, lee bender, Malcolm Scoular, Martha Hill, medusa, rowley and oram, Syndica, terry de havilland

It’s the girl who still looks slinky by the time it’s light again who gets taken home by the Prince. We’ve found eight party frocks which look amazingly ritzy into the dawn when other night-birds have wilted.

A rescan from 2010, partly because it deserved it anyway but also in tribute to the legendary and much-missed Terry de Havilland, whose tiered snakeskin wedges make an early appearance here (credited to Rowley and Oram, who stocked his shoes).

Photographed by Francois Lamy and Malcolm Scoular.

Scanned from Honey Magazine, December 1970.

Dress by Medusa. Choker by Esme Young. Two tone green snakeskin shoes from Rowley & Oram (Terry de Havilland)
Lurex laced up dress by Gillian Richard. Snakeskin party shoes from Rowley & Oram (Terry de Havilland)
Cocoa brown panne velvet dress by Syndica. Brown patent bar shoes by Bata.
Crepe dress by Bus Stop. Shoes by Bata. Black beaded belt found in Grandma’s old attic. Dressing gown cord tied as a choker by Biba. Artificial violets from Biba. Black bag by Martha Hill.
Slippery satin jet black dress with black and tan spotted voile jacket by Martha Hill. Two-coloured snakeskin shoes from Rowley & Oram (Terry de Havilland).