Simply Natural

19 magazine, 1970s, Antiquarius, chelsea cobbler, Essenses, hand tinting, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, james wedge, Sacha, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials, wigs

Long cardigans, long skirts, long scarves add up to a rustic setting in a relaxed mood. A casual look forward to restful autumn days.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1973

Maroon hat with turn up front. Matching sweater in maroon and camel, with plain camel collar. Brown pencil skirt with pleats at the side. All by Stirling Cooper. Cream tights by Mary Quant. Beige and brown leather bootees from Chelsea Cobbler. Long knitted scarf by Herbert Johnson. Wig in all pictures from Wigwham.
Camel sweater with red and blue Fair Isle pattern. Brown wool tweed mixture cardigan with cream and maroon trim. Brown pencil skirt. All by Stirling Cooper. Knitted scarf from Herbert Johnson.
All clothes by Stirling Cooper. Brown bootees from Chelsea Cobbler. Gloves from Ambalu. Scarf by Herbert Johnson.
All clothes by Stirling Cooper. Boots by Chelsea Cobbler. Scarf by Herbert Johnson.
Clothes by Stirling Cooper. Shoes from Sacha. Scarf from Essences at Antiquarius. Cane from Emmerton and Lambert.
Clothes by Stirling Cooper. Suede sandals by Baby Shoes. Scarf from Essences at Antiquarius.

They’re a knock-out

1970s, Abecita, bill klein, City Lights, Inspirational Images, janet reger, lingerie, petticoat magazine, platforms, Tommy Roberts, underwear, Vintage Editorials

How does a really cool lady knock spots off the opposition? Sneakily. She discards her vibrant purples and blacks, climbs sweetly into pure white undies and, as innocently as a schoolgirl, demolishes all resistance.

While this editorial can’t quite work out how regressive or feminist it wants to be, I cannot fault the pom-pom platform shoes which are all by City Lights Studio (aka post-Mr Freedom Tommy Roberts and far too short-lived). I would definitely karate chop for those babies.

Photographed by Bill Klein.

Photographed at Pickett’s Lock Recreation Centre.

Scanned from Petticoat, December 1973

Left: Lacy bra and pants by Abecita. Right: Boxer pants and nylon and lycra bra from Marks & Spencer.
Left: Vest and knickers from Marks & Spencer Right: Cami-knickers and bra by Janet Reger.
Left: Boxer pants and vest by Marks & Spencer Right: Bra and pants by Abecita.

The Party Dazzlers

1970s, Alana Collins, Anne Turkel, biba, Blades, bus stop, corocraft, cosmopolitan, Dana Gillespie, Deirdre McSharry, edina ronay, Eva Reuber-Staier, Feathers, Fiona Lewis, Hildebrand, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, just men, mary quant, Nancy Bleier, norman eales, Peter Bubb, Peter Finley, platforms, polly peck, Sally McElvin, sandie shaw, Stephanie McLean, terry de havilland, Vintage Editorials, yves saint laurent
Dana Gillespie, the bosomy (43 in., actually) Mary Magdalene in Jesus Christ Superstar, is the most modest of party girls. At the show’s opening night party she turned up in her old gipsy skirt and a t-shirt, happily flashing her gold and jewelled snake rings. “Sometimes I feel like being outrageous – I just wish there were more parties to entice me out. When I was on my own I went to parties to see more people so I wouldn’t be on my own.” Alone only for the picture, Dana wears her snake collection, backed by a velvet dress and jewelled jacket, designed by her friend Sally McElvin. Pop designer Sally makes one-offs only, from £20.

In the words of Noel Coward, every girl ought to be able to say the morning after, “I’ve been to a mah-vellous party.” A little champagne does not go amiss, but this winter the clothes alone will put a gleam in your eye. There are enough sequins, crystal beads and glittering fabrics to guarantee you are the star attraction. To clinch the deal, I’ve asked some of the most stunning party girls around to give their definition of what constitutes a marvellous party and to put the most dazzling party frocks to the test…

Fashion by Deirdre McSharry.

Photographed by Norman Eales.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, December 1972.

Ann Turkel is the 5ft 10in. tall New Yorker who steals the limelight from the stars at film premieres, so parties are just kid’s stuff. “Parties? That’s when I know no other woman in the room can ‘top me’. I make a real effort – my mother has dresses made up specially in New York and ships them over – I never wear the same dress as any other woman. I know I’m a success when the photographers start crowding me. I like a man who appreciates when you are looking great.” Ann, who likes to move in a cloud of Youth Dew by Estee Lauder, comes on diamond bright in sequins and taffeta. Jacket by Biba £20. Red dress by Mary Quant £12.60.
Eva Reuber-Staier is the ex-Miss World turned TV personality who helped present BBC1’s Animal Stars. She’s cool, poised and gregarious. “I love parties, the kind with pretty girls and clever men. I prefer big parties; there’s more of a choice. I got to at least two parties per week.” The best one she says was given by some Cambidge dons. “Clever, but sexy with it, and could they dance!” Would she make the first move if she fancied a man at a party? “Fortunately I don’t have to.” Cleverly draped, sexy dress by John Bates for Jean Varon £36. Roses by Spectrum. Shoes by Terry de Havilland £13.99. Pop singer Gary Hamilton, star of Hair and several horror films says, “It’s the quiet girls who catch my eye.” Gary in satin trousers by Blades.
Alana Collins is tall, blonde and blue-eyed. “At parties back home in Nacogdoches, Texas, the boys used to call me the Duchess because I love to get dressed up. That was the original one-horse town, but in London I still like to cause a stir. There’s such a variety at parties – long and short hair. I go for the man who is paying total attention to one woman. And if you give him all yours, that clicks.” A lady who watches her strategy. Alana is the perfect Cosmo party girl in pink draped jersey by John Bates for Jean Varon £27. Sheos by Yves Saint Laurent £19.50.
Sandie Shaw sings for her supper. Her husband Jeff Banks, designs for his. United on most fronts, the Banks are divided on parties: “I hate them,” she says. “I love ’em,” he leers. Then they go on remember half a dozen great parties they’ve given including one in a char-a-banc to Southend; another on a river boat and a third at Madame Tussauds. “My idea of a good party is mostly fellas,” says Sandie, “but I don’t like him to look posh. The thing is, he loves me dressed up.” Dolled up for “that great party no one ever seems to give,” as Jeff says, is Sandie in a Banks special, suitably glittery in green and gold gauze. Sandie’s hair by Smiles. Jeff’s clothes by Blades.
Nancy Bleier, a bouncing brunette model import from Milwaukee, prefers her parties on the small size. “Just a few intimate friends, a quite dinner and dancing at Tramp or Annabel’s,” says Nancy who keeps her party figure by taking modern dance lessons. Nancy makes her eyes up like Sophia Loren, wears a lot of scent and generally sticks to trousers at parties. “My French boyfriend says: ‘Darling why don’t you ever wear a dress?’ He offered to buy me one – but never did.” Not downcast, Nancy dresses up for Swiss model Reto in a 1000 watt lime glitter outfit from Biba, top £14, skirt £15.25. Reto’s dinner suit from Just Men, £45.
Edina Ronay, the actress and model says: “A good party is when Warren Beatty murmers ‘call me tomorrow’. Actually the best parties are the ones I give myself – straight and freaky, champagne and – uh – cakes. The people look at each other and enjoy the difference. What happens afterwards – that’s what counts about parties.” Edina, who had her hair hennaed in Morocco, gets ready for her Christmas party in crushed pink velvet and feathers. Dress by Biba £15, boa and ‘diamond’ ring by Bus Stop, £6.50 and £1.95. Robert wears sequined jacket by Dior and ruffled shirt by Just Men.
Stephanie McLean, at 5ft 10in., is the kind of status blonde most men hope to meet at parties. And it was at a party where her husband, a photographer who specialises in nudes, met her. Says Stephanie, “Now when we go to parties we separate – otherwise why bother to go out at all? – but I keep my eye on him. I prefer relaxed, informal parties and almost always wear jeans. Sometimes I get dressed up and he says ‘you look fantatic, we’ll go out.'” Looking dressed up in a glittery silver and black taffeta dress by Polly Peck £12.85. Peter Finley the model who prefers parties for two, wears black satin trousers from Blades.
Film actress Fiona Lewis has the sophisticated face of the Seventies, so it’s not surprising that her idea of a party is simple – and expensive. “Lots of drinks and lots of people, never punch which is a bore and bad for your digestion. Simple things like smoked salmon and chilled white wine are best. And I prefer to wear fantasy clothes which I run up myself from scarves. I ask dishy men and tell them to bring their friends.” Fiona adds her own glitter to a black and white taffeta halter dress, Hildebrand about £18.50 and also a floating red chiffon dress aove right, at Feathers £25. Peter Bubb the model wears velvet dinner jacket by Just Men £35.

What pinafores did next

1970s, anello and davide, Angela at London Town, duc, Gina Fratini, Ginger Group, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, kensington market, kurt geiger, Marielle, mary quant, miss selfridge, Moya Bowler, Titfers, Vintage Editorials, Vogue
Cotton print pinafore over a sweet flowered dress. Deep ruffles on shoulders and a big beautiful bonnet to match. By Titfers at Miss Selfridge. Red button shoes at Anello & Davide.

Long dresses and skirts in crepe and cotton prints – related to others just as small, fresh, sharp or soft, on pinafore smocks and aprons. These are not so much to keep you clean, more to make you look prettier; and you can be dairy maids, kitchen maids, Kate Greenaway girls all through summer.

And so began the kickback against all things clean, crisp and space age…

Photographed by Duc.

Scanned from Vogue, April 1971.

Fine floppy fluted crepe de chine dress by Marielle. Liberty lawn pinafore by Angela at London Town. Brown boots by Moya Bowler for Edouard Jerrold at Kurt Geiger.
Dairy cream cotton smock dress. Leg o’mutton sleeves, buttons up the back, print of wild pale roses and primrose ribbons. Gauzy white pinafore, lace and rose pink ribbons. Both by Gina Fratini. Shoes at Anello & Davide. Lacy pink silk bonnet at Sharon’s Shoppe, Kensington Market.
Cotton and rayon wrap, two sizes of polka dot, white on cherry red patches. By Mary Quant Ginger Group. Cherry and red stripe cotton apron by In Pressler. Natural straw hat at Herbert Johnson.

On Second Thoughts

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara hulanicki, biba, Inspirational Images, Sarah Moon, Vintage Editorials

For those dreamy moments when you feel you want to look feminine and pretty, when you want to get out of your casual clothes and wear something floaty and special, Biba have made lovely, plain satin and two-tone patchwork satin skirts and tops which are alluring and very glamorous for the summer. They have also designed long, floating cotton voile dresses in large, dark prints which are flattering to figures still suffering from seasonal over-eating.

All clothes from Biba.

Many thanks to Barbara Hulanicki for letting me know that she took these stunning photos (modelled by Eva from Biba). They were uncredited in the magazine.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1970.

Yankee Swank

1970s, biba, Bombacha, Charles Batten, Crocodile, Diane Logan, Fenwick, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, liberty, liberty's, Monet, monty coles, quorum, radley, Spectrum, Sujon, Vintage Editorials, Wardrobe
Giant pink lily printed cotton dress with swirling flared skirt from Biba

City life heats up when the sidewalks are crowded and the cabs full. Give yourself a break and see the sights. Step out in cotton dresses for a cool look at a hot town.

Photographed by Monty Coles.

Scanned from Honey, August 1975.

Open necked short sleeved printed crepe de chine dress by Radley from Quorum. Fringe scarf from Wardrobe. Hat by Charles Batten.
Mint green cotton dress by Strawberry Studio from Che Guevara. Scarf from Fenwick.
Cream cotton dress with drawstring waist by Monet. Scarf from Liberty. Hat by Charles Batten.
Navy and mauve cotton poplin dress by Monet.
Beige and mulberry flower printed crepe de chine dress by Sujon. Scarf from Fenwick.
Slash neck cotton cheesecloth dress from Crocodile. Scarf from Liberty.
Rust cotton open necked baggy dress from Bombacha. Cloche by Diane Logan.
Pale pink and white leaf printed dress from Biba. Scarf from Liberty. Hat by Charles Batten.
Navy and rust checked and striped crepe de chine dress with matching scarf from Spectrum.

Heads you win

1970s, alkasura, Andreas George, Bermona, Feathers, hans feurer, hats, Inspirational Images, Jean Charles Brosseau, jean shrimpton, liberty, liberty's, mr freedom, quorum, ritva, sunday times magazine, Vintage Editorials
One of a selection of hats designed by Andreas George that are decorated with anything from fake flowers, ribbons, plastic fruit to tiny furry animals. £7 from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3

Suddenly this summer the shops are selling masses of hats that before would have only been dug up for garden parties, weddings, sports days or camping it up. For years magazines and designers have shown their clothes with hats, but they don’t usually turn up in the street. Fashion editors often feature ‘picture hats’ like those on the previous page posed in some romantic setting or framing an immaculate new make-up, but one never actually sees them on a number 19 bus. Now hats have gone the way of all clothes; there are no rules; you can wear anything with anything. Any hat, whether it’s wide-brimmed and floppy with half a haberdashery department stuck over it, or a small crocheted cloche pinned with a bunch of plastic fruit, i fine with either nostalgic Forties’ dresses or a dirty old pair of jeans. And you can still wear it to a wedding if you want to.

Modelled by Jean Shrimpton.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, June 20th 1971.

Smooth straw hat with fake anemones, by Bermona, £2.85 from Dickins and Jones.
Cotton cloche pinned back with a bunch of cherries if you like, £4.50 from Quorum. Check and spot crepe shirt £4.20 from Mr Freedom, 20 Kensington Church Street. White cotton shorts by Ritva £7.88 from Countdown, 137 King’s Road.
Pink felt hat with bright harlequin pattern under the brim by Jean Charles Brosseau, £7 from Feathers, 43 Kensington High Street.
Plain wide-brimmed panama hat, £2.85 from Liberty’s.

The Shortest Summer

1970s, Copper Coin, Crochetta, Elliott, harold ingram, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, mary quant, Maudie Moon, mr freedom, ravel, Richard Selby, Russell & Bromley, Sharcleod, simon massey, stirling cooper, terry de havilland, Vintage Editorials

After the explosion of hot pants and vulgar satin knickers, shorts are still with us, but they’ve emerged neater and brighter – put together with layered vests and skimpy sweaters, legs that go on forever and bright vampy shoes or clogs. It’s the only way to be cool this summer.

Photographed by Richard Selby.

Scanned from Honey, June 1971

Far left: T-shirt by Maudie Moon. Clingy crepe shorts by Simon Massey. Thigh high socks by Mr Freedom. Left: Banlon bomber jacket and plain fluted shorts by Jeff Banks. Tights by Quant. Right: Banlon vest, shorts and shirt all by John Marks. Tights by Quant. Shoes by Ravel. Far right: Banlon vest with plain black shorts by John Marks. Banlon shirt by Jeff Banks. Tights by Quant. Shoes by Elliotts.
Far left: Striped cotton knit sweater and plain shorts by Zeekit by Crochetta. Stripy socks by Echo. Lavender suede shoes by Dolcis. Left: Halter neck knit sweater and shorts by Zeekit by Crochetta. Socks by Quant. Clogs by Russell & Bromley. Right: Stripy ribbed vest by Shar-Cleod. Scarlet jersey shorts by Stirling Cooper. Socks by Sunarama. Snakeskin wedge shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Skinny sweater and matching mini vest by Syndica. Linen shorts by Friends. Socks by Quant. Red clogs by Wardle and Williams.
Left to right: Striped skinny rib sweater by Janine at Harold Ingram. Yellow shorts by Copper Coin. Vest and red pepper shorts with green patch pockets both by Peter London. Rainbow acrylic vest by Peter London. Yellow jersey shorts by Stirling Cooper. Woollen football vest by Van der Fransen. Cherry red shirt by Littlewoods. Red Orlon shorts by Syndica.

Pretty Pieces

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, Bombacha, Elizabeth Huxley, Inspirational Images, Susan Backhouse, swimwear, Vintage Editorials
Turquoise and yellow net bikini by Susan Backhouse. Bone and shell necklaces from Bombacha. Fish earring by Nicholas Adams.

I told you there was a lot of swimwear in this issue, didn’t I? I’m amazed by these Susan Backhouse pieces. I’ve only ever had one piece by her which is an incredible, voluminous cotton skirt in the style of Vivienne Westwood, so I’m boggling at these skimpy, pop-art inspired swimsuits and bikinis.

Photographed by Elizabeth Huxley. Hair and make-up by Colin Booker.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1979.

Blue one-piece with shell applique by Susan Backhouse. Bone necklace from Bombacha.
Pale blue and pink shell shaped bikini by Susan Backhouse. Fish earring by Nicholas Adams. Bone necklaces from Bombacha.
Yellow costume with star fish applique by Susan Backhouse. Bone and shell necklaces from Bombacha.
Turquoise bikini with star fish motif by Susan Backhouse. Blue earrings by Adrien Mann. Necklace by Nicholas Adams.

Chiconomy

19 magazine, 1970s, Ace, coopers, Inspirational Images, Ivory, Joseph, Ku Khanh, Russell & Bromley, Swanky Modes, Vintage Editorials
Blouse by Sue Barnes for Coopers. Shorts by British Home Stores. Black sandals by Ravel. Glasses by Primetta.

For the budget-conscious with imagination, high fashion is well within reach and, as you can see, many of these crisp, colourful cottons are from surplus and chain stores and even supermarkets. Take a look at Tesco where we picked up an amazing cotton top for only £3.99! We also dressed up the one-time overall by belting the waist, adding masses of jewellery and finishing off with high, strappy shoes.

To prove how good these outfits can look, we shot the photos in Rodeo Drive, a snob area in Beverly Hills. So never turn your nose up at a bargain.

Photographed by Ku Khanh. Hair and make-up by Colin Booker.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1979

Overall from Laurence Corner. Mules by Russell & Bromley. Earrings from Swanky Modes. Belt by Trimfit. Brooch on belt from Swanky Modes.
Navy blouse by Tesco. White pleated skirt by Pret-a-Porter. Blue sandals by Ivory. Glasses from Bombacha. Earrings and necklace from Ace. Pearl bracelet from Joseph. Belt by Trimfit. Brooch by Nicholas Adams.
Lilac overall from Laurence Corner. Lilac strappy sandals by Ivory. Glasses by Primetta. Earrings and necklace from Ace. Satin belt by Trimfit.