Well Dressed

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, Antiquarius, biba, Chelsea Antiques Market, Essenses, gillian richard, Herbert Johnson, Ian Batten, Inspirational Images, Michael Berkofsky, Ronald Keith, Sacha, Spectrum, stirling cooper, susan marsh, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials
Cream Trevira cotton dress by Gillian Richard. Black patent shoes from Sacha. Silk scarf from a selection at Essences at Antiquarius. Papier mache bangles by Fabrice for Zig Zag. / White cotton pull on hat from Herbert Johnson. Blue and white cotton dress from Spectrum. White peep toe shoes from Ronald Keith. White gloves by Cornelia James. Necklace and bangle from a selection at Zig Zag. Bag from Universal Witness.

Spring’s in the air – and with it the chance to wear all those elegant eye-catching dresses. If you’ve been feeling bundled up in woolies, here’s the chance to look feminine again.

All photographs taken at the Hyde Park Hotel, Knightsbridge, SW1.

Photographed by Mike Berkofsky.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, April 1973.

Green and white spotted scarf from a selection at Essences at Antiquarius. Soft green dress with flower print from Van Der Fransen. Belt inset with flowers and elephant clasp, and matching bangle, both from Biba. / Lilac and mauve ankle length dress with purple rosette trim from Van Der Fransen. Pink metallic platform shoes from Sacha.
Cotton mid calf dress from Biba. Gloves from Cornelia James. Beads from a selection at Susan Marsh at the Chelsea Antique Market. White bangles from Adrien Mann. / Pink cotton smock with floral print, yellow cotton skirt, both from Biba. Gloves by Cornelia James.
White cotton hat from Herbert Johnson. Blue and white dress from a selection of elegant old dresses at Van Der Fransen. Black patent shoes from Sacha. / Blue and white fan print dress from a selection at Van Der Fransen. White peep toes with flower trim from Ronald Keith.
White cotton hat from Herbert Johnson. Blue and white striped jersey dress by Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper. Shoes by Sacha. / Blue and white striped dress by Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper. Shoes from Ronald Keith.

The Great Imposters

1970s, anello and davide, aquascutum, Beged'Or, Bermona, Borg, caroline baker, chelsea cobbler, Dada, Feathers, Herbert Johnson, jane whiteside, Jonvelle, kensington market, kurt geiger, laura ashley, Laura Jamieson, Lizzie Carr, Martha Hill, Mexicana, Mog, Morel, nova magazine, peter robinson, Russell & Bromley, Selfridges, stirling cooper, the souk, The Sweet Shop, velmar, Vintage Editorials, Wild Mustang Co.
Tissavel-lined Galaxy coat by Beged’Or approx. £50; cotton blouse by Mexicana, £13; fur fabric jeans by Newmans, 12 gns; hairy slipper boots at Russell & Bromley, £6 19s; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s; hatband made from an Estonian tie at the Russian Shop, 7s 6d; fur bag at The Souk, £3 5s; wool gloves at Dickins & Jones, 10s:

Leather and fur get more expensive every year. It’s not only the taxes and rising costs of production. It’s just that there aren’t enough good animal skins for leather around to meet the consumer demand. Furs are there in quantity for the fabulously rich. Luckily a good substitute has been found – the nylon-spun, man-made sort. Some, especially in the leather field, are so like the real thing the only way you can tell the difference is by the smell. Take the white coat on pages 46 and 47. It’s fake and costs about £50. It has a double in real fur and leather for £270. Made by the same people who have duplicated most of their collection this way and it takes an eagle eye and nose to tell the difference. Others are just furry, woolly fabrics, obviously not imitating some four-legged friend, which is one of the nicest things about them. This fur fabric is now getting the treatment it deserves. Nairn Williamson (more famous for their Vinyl floor and wall coverings) were the first to see its potential and got six designers to use their Velmar fur fabric in their winter collections. Jane Whiteside for Stirling Cooper (new label getting famous fast for their beautiful jersey co-ordinates) was the cleverest of them all. She used the best sludgy colours, mixed it with needlecord to make a group of jackets and coats to go with trousers, skirts and blouses. Borg (American originated and the pioneers in England of this deep pile fabric) has been around for a long time, mostly on the inside of duffle and raincoats but it’s on the outside as a normal fabric that it looks its best. Next winter there will be a lot more of it around, now that designers are getting less snobby about plastics. Not only is it as warm as fur, it is, of course, much cheaper and you don’t smell like a wet dog when you come in from the rain, either. So you can wear it herding sheep on lost weekends, or in town queuing for the cinema without any guilt feelings about ruining your assets.

Insert obligatory ‘I don’t agree with the thrust of the argument for fake furs as just a financial consideration here’ caveat from me, your content provider. Don’t shout at me, basically. But it’s an interesting insight into the mindset of 1970, and the proliferation of fake furs and skins at that time. It’s also a breathtakingly styled and photographed work of art from Caroline Baker and Jonvelle.

Fashion by Caroline Baker.

Photographed by Jonvelle.

Scanned from Nova, January 1970.

Mediaeval velvet applique dress by Laura Jamieson at The Sweetshop, 20 gns; Tissavel and Galaxy waistcoat by Beged’Or, £22.
Velmar jacket and needlecord trousers by Stirling Cooper, £8 10s., £5 1Gs; leggings by Chelsea Cobbler, to order, 10 gns; cotton shirt from selection at Dada, Kensington Antique Market from 2 gns.
Acrilan jacket by Lizzie Carr approx. 24 gns; suede trousers by Morel, 17 gns, tied with leather strips from John Lewis Haberdashery Dept, 1s 10d per yard; wellingtons at Russell and Bromley, £3 19s; woven sash wrapped around neck at Herbert Johnson, 25s; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s; wool gloves at Selfridges, &s 11d
Velmar and Courtelle trousers by Martha Hill, approx. 8 gns; poncho at Peter Robinson, £7; wool shirt by Stirling Cooper, £4 5s; studded wristlet by Knees at Kensington Antique Market, 1 gn; suede moccasin boots by Anello & Davide, £8 15s; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s; sheepskin rug from The Souk from £3 19s 6d to £6; flask from Kensington Antique Market.
Velmar fur fabric floor length coat trimmed with canvas by Mog, £20, over long cotton nightgown by Laura Ashley, £5; knitted wool socks at Feathers, £1 1s 6d
Velmar coat with needlecord and zipper trims (top left) by Stirling Cooper, 18 gns; pale suede and leather lace-up boots by Kurt Geiger, 35 gns; wool gloves at Selfridges, 8s 11d; leather belt by The Wild Mustang Manufacturing Co., approx. £3 12s 6d; fur shepherdess hat, bag and drinking flask from a selection at Kensington Antique Market
Velmar jacket and needlecord trousers (top right) by Stirling Cooper, £12 19s 6d, £5 10s; big polo-neck ribbed Shetland wool sweater at Aquascutum, £6 15s; corrugated leather lace-up boots at Russell and Bromley, £29 19s; knitted Aran mitts at Selfridges, 16s 11d; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s, furry bag from a selection at Kensington Antique Market.

Necking

1970s, biba, Chester Martin, christa peters, Honey Magazine, ika hindley, Inspirational Images, Jacqmar, Jasper, jeff banks, John Dove and Molly White, novelty prints, Ronnie Stirling, stirling cooper, Turnbull & Asser, Vintage Editorials
Hollywood film star printed cotton satin shirt by John Dove and Molly White for Jasper. Pure silk herringbone tie by Turnbull and Asser.

These are the ties that go with the shirts that are all part of the big 40s revival. Floppy silky shirts with subtly embossed patterns, and ties and scarves galore; they can be tied in bows, pinned with brooches, loosely knotted or worn like the men do. In fact, as long as they trail elegantly down the front of your shirt you can wear these ties just any way you like.

As a dedicated fan of long silk scarves (and silky blouses, and novelty brooches in fact) I’m just taking this editorial as my one stop guide to getting dressed this autumn.

Photographed by Christa Peters.

Possibly modelled by Ika Hindley (it looks like her mouth).

Scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Striped embossed crepe de chine blouse by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Paisley silk scarf by Chester Martin. Cicada brooch from Biba.
Feathers crepe de chine blouse by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Long spotted silk scarf by Chester Martin.
Avocado green crepe de chine blouse with fern pattern by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Silk chevron kipper tie by Turnbull and Asser. Egyptian stock pin from Biba.
Wavy patterned jacquard shirt by Jeff Banks. Printed silk scarf by Chester Martin. Sea horse brooch from Biba.
Flower embossed chocolate brown jacquard shirt by Jeff Banks. Long silk art deco scarf by Jacqmar. Flying eagle brooch from Biba.

Get Dressed

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, Charles Batten, Cloud Nine, David Anthony, Inspirational Images, manolo blahnik, Mary Graeme, nostalgia, Retro, Sacha, Samuel Sherman, Spectrum, stirling cooper, strawberry studio, Sunarama, Vintage Editorials, way in, zapata
Scarf around head from Nostalgia. Sun dress by Stirling Cooper. Blue glass necklace from Cloud Nine. Second hand floral sun dress from Retro. Rayon knit shawl from Jump. White leather shoes by Sacha. Pearl necklaces worn around the wrist from Adrien Mann. Flower and veiling from department stores.

Summer sundresses can go a long way. They’re so versatile – you can wear them for work and then dress them up for the evening with hats, scarves and jewellery. Here are some of our ideas.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1975.

Straw hats from Marida. Second hand crepe de Chine dresses from Retro. Belt from Way In. Socks by Sunarama. Shoes by Zapata (left) and Sacha (right).
Black crepe de chine daffodil print dress by Strawberry Studio. Shawl from Cloud Nine. Tan sandals by Mary Graeme. Pink straw hat by Charles Batten. Black crepe de Chine smock by Spectrum. Green canvas shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Bangles by Adrien Mann.
White cotton pull on hat by Edward Mann. Pale green and white straight dress by Concept at Samuel Sherman. Blue straw hat by Charles Batten. Pale blue and white dress by Concept at Samuel Sherman.

Clothes that help you hang on to your money

1970s, Alex Chatelain, Ambalu, Browns, Burtons, bus stop, Butler & Wilson, chelsea cobbler, cornucopia, cosmopolitan, Elle, Flight Studios, janet reger, jap, John Craig, Joseph, kangol, Kickers, Knitcraft, lee bender, mr freedom, mushroom, Pattie Barron, Shelana, Spectrum, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials
Chinese satin top and pants by Ambalu. / Thirties lingerie set by John Craig. Satin panties by Janet Reger. Necklace from Butler and Wilson.

First-job salaries can present problems when you’re not used to juggling the rent around a new skirt or sweater. But there are ways—as you’ll see on these pages—of looking not just good, but positively great on a tight budget. Learn the rules of the “looking-good-on-a-little” game . . . remember that one pair of pants at £10+ will outlive two pairs that split whenever you sit down; that washable fabrics mean you’ll have no cleaning bills. Learn how to bleach and dye, starch and press properly—so you’ll be able to match vest tops and T-shirts to your new longer flowery skirts and keep them looking fresh. Invest in beautiful leather shoes: they last and look good if polished every day. Spend more on accessories —sometimes—than a new dress. Build your wardrobe around two or three colours—as crazy as you like—and find jolly extras to pull it all together. . . . This may be the summer you always wear a hat. Here is my choice of nine outfits . . . chic, very wearable and all cheap at the price. That’s fashion knowhow.

Fashion by Pattie Barron.

Photographed by Alex Chatelain.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1974.

Crepe de Chine suit at Bus Stop. Vest from Browns. Hat at Jap and Joseph. Flowers and shoes from Elle. Bag from Flight Studios.
Crepe de Chine suit at Bus Stop. Vest from Browns. Hat at Jap and Joseph. Flowers and shoes from Elle. Bag from Flight Studios.
Skirt and top by Stirling Cooper. Aran cardigan from John Craig. Raffia wedgies from The Chelsea Cobbler. Kangol beret.
Knitcraft top. Shorts by Stirling Cooper. Shoes by Kickers. His outfit from Burton’s.
Vest by John Craig. Shelana skirt. Shoes by The Chelsea Cobbler. Hat from Spectrum.
Crepe dress by Mr Freedom. Ostrich feather boa from Cornucopia. Man’s suit from Jap and Joseph.
Candy stripe cotton halter dress by Mushroom.
Stripey top and plain trousers from Bus Stop. Beret from Kangol. White leather bag from Flight Studios.

Flora Exotica

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, David Anthony, Ferrer Y Sentis, Inspirational Images, Ivory, jap, Joseph, kenzo, Lo Roco, Mrs Howie, Sacha, stirling cooper, Taramina, Vintage Editorials
Floral print dress with lace-up front by Stirling Cooper. Pink shoes by Ivory.

Floral prints are bursting out all over. Add these to crepe de chines, cotton and cotton jerseys and, suddenly, you have the most colourful summer of all.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, June 1977.

Floral print dress with lace up sides by Lo Roco. Gold shoes by Sacha.
Palm print one shoulder t-shirt dress by Ferrer Y Sentis from Joseph.
Shocking pink and yellow bikini by Mrs Howie. Floral skirt by Taramina. Blue shoes by Ivory.
Floral printed lace up dress by Lo Roco. Bangles by Adrien Mann.
Yellow broderie anglaise t-shirt and bright pink floral skirt. Both by Jap at Joseph. Pink shoes by Ivory.

Last Tango in Tijuana

1970s, antony price, che guevara, Dinah Adams, Dolcis, gillian richard, granny takes a trip, Herbert Johnson, Honey Magazine, Ian Batten, Inspirational Images, jean junction, Martha Hill, miss mouse, polly peck, rae spencer cullen, Roy A. Giles, Russell & Bromley, Samm, Spectrum, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials, wallis

If you can’t tango, simply steal into the spotlight in these flamboyant rumba dresses. The slipped shoulder strap, the bared midriff and the full-blown flouncy skirts all spell out the sexiest numbers for summer.

The main difference between the content of a magazine like Honey, as opposed to Vogue or Queen, is that the designers tend to be the more intriguing and less well-known of the period. If you want names like Miss Mouse, Granny Takes a Trip or Antony Price, these magazines should always be your first port of call. This shoot alone features one of my Holy Grail pieces by Granny Takes a Trip: the ruffled tie front top and skirt ensemble designed by Dinah Adams. Previously a designer for two other cult London boutiques, Mr Freedom and Paradise Garage, painfully little is known about Dinah Adams (misattributed as ‘Diana’ in the original credits). Which is why it’s always lovely to see her work represented anywhere.

Also shown here is a frothy, frilly delight of a frock by Miss Mouse, a.k.a Rae Spencer-Cullen. A personal favourite of mine, the Miss Mouse aesthetic is precisely why this early Seventies period is my favourite for fashion. Her work was heavily Fifties-inspired, quite ahead of the curve in the scheme of things, but always with a novel twist. Spencer-Cullen is yet another designer whose life remains something of a mystery, despite being a part of a hugely influential circle which included artists Duggie Fields and Andrew Logan. It seems that this anonymity was (at least initially) intentional, as an article from the Glasgow Herald in 1976 declared.

“At first, six years ago, when presenting her quirky designs on fashion, she seemed shy and utterly retiring. Miss Mouse could not be contacted easily by the press. She was elusive, hazed in shadows, a real mouse about publicity in fact. The only evidence of her entire existence was her clothes.”

In a world where we are so used to having information at our fingertips, there is something quite enchanting about this; tiny scraps must be stitched together to create a flimsy silhouette of a creative genius.

Photographed by Roy A Giles.

Scanned from Honey, July 1973.

(Please note – this blog originally appeared in 2016 on Shrimpton Couture’s ‘Curated’ blog project which has since been removed. It seemed a shame to let the posts disappear completely so I hope to eventually repost all my work here.)

Rose-strewn wrapover cotton bolero and long frilled skirt from Spectrum. Raffia and cotton tie belt by Herbert Johnson. Right: Tightly ruched off-the-shoulder top and long skirt with deeply riched waistband from Wallis.
Ritzy ruffled satin bolero top with frilled skirt by Dinah Adams for Granny Takes a Trip. Wavy leather sandals by Samm. Right: Slinky spotted Tricel dress by Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper. Crackly taffeta long flounced skirt by Antony Price for Che Guevara. Wooden and patent sandals by Russell & Bromley.
Flouncy black and white gingham off-the-shoulder dress printed with orange and lemon flowers by Gillian Richard. Canary yellow sandals by Samm. Embroidered cummerbund by Herbert Johnson.
Swirling striped cotton skirt by Jean Junction. Off-the-shoulder pleated blouse by Martha Hill. Polished leather boots from Dolcis.
Black cotton ruched and flared rumba dress printed with multi-coloured flowers and birds by Miss Mouse. Apple green shoes by Russell & Bromley.

Left: Crisp cotton gingham blouse and flounced skirt both by Martha Hill. Oval bead choker and bangles by Paul Stephens. Right: Ruffled cotton check blouse and tiered skirt by Polly Peck. Cummerbund by Herbert Johnson. Shoes by Russell & Bromley.

Soft Summer Shape-Ups

Bata, Britannia Land of Plenty, forbidden fruit, jane giunchi, Martha Hill, Nik Nik, petticoat magazine, Plain Clothes, ravel, Roger Charity, stirling cooper, Sue Hone, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials
Nik Nik floral print dress. Stirling Cooper satin pants. Ravel mules. / Striped skirt at Martha Hill. Blouse with embroidered flowers at Forbidden Fruit branches. Bata mules. Jane Giunchi brooch.

You can take the summer’s pastels just the way you want. When you’re not wearing neat and co-ordinated nursery prints, try pink and blue in peasant style. You’ll find a pettiness you thought had vanished.

Fashion by Sue Hone.

Photographed by Roger Charity.

Scanned from Petticoat, 10th June 1972.

Floral print skirt at Britannia Land of Plenty. Plain Clothes short sleeved vest at Sidney Smith. Brooch and print scarf both at Van der Fransen.

Sunday Best

19 magazine, 1970s, alkasura, anello and davide, Bermona, Bilbo, bus stop, edward mann, Inspirational Images, John Bishop, laura ashley, lee bender, miss mouse, rae spencer cullen, Spectrum, stirling cooper, Travers Tempos, Vintage Editorials
White felt cloche hat by Bermona hats. Pale cream floral waisted shirt by Stirling Cooper. Long white cheesecloth skirt by Alkasura. White lace up boots by Anello and Davide. / Straw panama hat by Bus Stop. Pale green and dark green print sailor suit by Laura Ashley. Boots by Anello and Davide. / Chipped straw hat by Edward Mann. Yellow dress with stripes by Spectrum. White boots from Bilbo. / White hat with ribbon by Spectrum. Blue and white gingham shirt and skirt by Spectrum. White boots by Anello and Davide. / Peanut straw hat from Edward Mann. White cheesecloth shirt and skirt by Spectrum. Boots by Anello and Davide.

Summer is the time for romance. It’s the time for walking in the woods or by the water’s edge, and for having those delicious picnics. It’s the time for looking soft and feminine in long, flowing dresses and picture hats. So we’ve chosen some of the prettiest dresses, skirt and hats we could find, to help you look your best when you while away those sunny days.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, June 1972.

White piqued cotton hat from Bus Stop. White seersucker dress trimmed in red by Miss Mouse. Sunglasses model’s own. / Straw hat by Edward Mann. Pink, yellow and blue gingham dress by Travers Tempos. / Straw bowler by Edward Mann. Red and white spoted dress with red buttons by Miss Mouse. / Straw hat by Edward Mann. Cream calico smock and skirt by Laura Ashley. / Red straw hat by Edward Mann. Long blue cotton dress with toning panels by Travers Tempos.

Simply Natural

19 magazine, 1970s, Antiquarius, chelsea cobbler, Essenses, hand tinting, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, james wedge, Sacha, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials, wigs

Long cardigans, long skirts, long scarves add up to a rustic setting in a relaxed mood. A casual look forward to restful autumn days.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1973

Maroon hat with turn up front. Matching sweater in maroon and camel, with plain camel collar. Brown pencil skirt with pleats at the side. All by Stirling Cooper. Cream tights by Mary Quant. Beige and brown leather bootees from Chelsea Cobbler. Long knitted scarf by Herbert Johnson. Wig in all pictures from Wigwham.
Camel sweater with red and blue Fair Isle pattern. Brown wool tweed mixture cardigan with cream and maroon trim. Brown pencil skirt. All by Stirling Cooper. Knitted scarf from Herbert Johnson.
All clothes by Stirling Cooper. Brown bootees from Chelsea Cobbler. Gloves from Ambalu. Scarf by Herbert Johnson.
All clothes by Stirling Cooper. Boots by Chelsea Cobbler. Scarf by Herbert Johnson.
Clothes by Stirling Cooper. Shoes from Sacha. Scarf from Essences at Antiquarius. Cane from Emmerton and Lambert.
Clothes by Stirling Cooper. Suede sandals by Baby Shoes. Scarf from Essences at Antiquarius.