Flower Face

1970s, bianchini, clive arrowsmith, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Make-up, pierre cardin, Vogue

Flower face, eyebrows powdered out and eyes shadowed deeper, brighter; the heart of Cardin’s morning glory dress of Bianchini organza finely pleated into a double ruff to frame the head. Make-up by Gil of Geminesse.

Photographed by Clive Arrowsmith.

Scanned from Vogue, April 1970.

Is our red too dangerous?

19 magazine, 1970s, Hair and make-up, Make-up, Miners, Vintage Adverts

Miners make-up advert scanned from 19 Magazine, March 1971.

New Scene Baby Dolls

1960s, Babydoll, Hair and make-up, Illustrations, Make-up, Rave, Vintage Adverts

“Wake up to new make-up”

There is always wonder and joy when I find another of these Woolworths Baby Doll make-up adverts. But there is also always eternal frustration that I don’t know who illustrated them.

Scanned from Rave magazine, July 1969.

Go Jet

Antiquarius, barbara daly, barry lategan, Butler & Wilson, Cathee Dahmen, hair, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, pablo and delia, Vogue
Spangled georgette ruff cape and dress by Pablo and Delia, about £90 at Browns. Rings and bangles from Butler and Wilson, Antiquarius.

Modelled by Cathee Dahmen.

Hair by John at Leonard. Make-up by Barbara Daly.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, January 1973.

Streaking So It Barely Shows

1960s, barry lategan, charlotte martin, hair, Hair and make-up, leonard, Make-up, The Purple Shop

Naturally mouse hair is usually limp so it needs extra life, extra lift, extra bounce. All this can be achieved by very, very fine highlighting. Keep away from obvious streaks, let your hair look instead as if it’s just come out of the sun. An expert will know exactly which colours to choose for you, exactly the right depth and contrast of highlighting. You can have water-rinse streaks or permanent; you can have your own hair coloured, or your hairpiece. The subtly streaked hair, left, is controlled at the top, combed into waves, then frizzed into a soft cloud at the shoulders. The make-up has the same romantic, pre-Raphaelite look with Orlane’s Satilane beige no. 4 with brush-on rouge no. 3. Eyes: cream pearl shadow in Bleu Perle, Bleu Marine roll-on mascara. Lipstick: beige-pink Paprika. Necklace: an eagle from the Purple Shop, Chelsea Antique Market. Hair colour, here, and in the picture, above, by Daniel, styling by Leonard, both from the House of Leonard.

Modelled by Charlotte Martin.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Beauty in Vogue, 1969.

Eye Catching

1970s, beauty, david bailey, Demas, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, jean muir, Make-up, Vogue

Helga, half-Austrian, half Irish/American and twenty-one this month, with new eye-catching make-up: Leichner’s theatrical grease stick in Chrome with Carmine 1 over it above the eye hollow. Foundation: Blend of Pearl with Pink on Pink Glowtone over cheeks, Alletta lipstick, all Kamera Klear. Jean Muir’s silk crepe jersey dress, pink coral flower brooch with earrings to match by Demas.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Vogue, March 1st 1970.

How we gave Linda a new lovely look

1970s, beauty, beauty tips, Chris Holland, Estee Lauder, Hair and make-up, Linda Hayden, Make-up, Max Factor, petticoat magazine, way in

This is Linda Hayden, seventeen year old actress and friend of Richard Harris. Of her he’s said, “She looks absolutely lovely, she’s a wonderful girl.” Linda doesn’t altogether agree with him. She doesn’t think she looks absolutely lovely because she says her cheeks are too podgy. She is very partial to lager and lime, Cornish cream, butter and crusty fresh bread : But when she is working on a film like Baby Love or her latest, Satan’s Skin, her weight just falls off. Still, normally it’s a great battle to keep to her ideal seven and a half stone. When we met Linda, she told us that she had two ambitions: 1. To stop being cast as a nymphet in horror films. 2. To learn how to shade her face so it always looked slim. Linda has very little time to learn about makeup. When she was fifteen she starred in Baby Love, but was not allowed to go and see it. After that she had a series of sexy parts in Hammer films like Taste the Blood of Dracula. In her latest film with Charles Hanson and Piers Haggard there are all sorts of evil doings, Linda told us, “Hardly a moment went by without someone being impaled on a pitchfork, raped, or stabbed with shears in the back. I cut my foot to ribbons with the end of the fork first time I had to do it and was rushed off for a tetanus injection.” Linda, who lives at home with her parents and sister goes off food for about a week when she wants to look really super. She just lives on cheese and coffee. This way she can lose five pounds without trying. She was vague about future plans. She is in no rush to do another film and laughed at any idea of marriage. Richard Harris’s former wife, Elizabeth, and Rex Harrison are inseparable but Richard is cagey about marrying again and says, “Even Helen of Troy couldn’t drag me to the altar anyway Linda is too young and ambitious and I am too old and ambitious. I am going on forty!” With the help of a makeup artist from Eyelure, we show in step by step pictures how the skilful use of makeup can alter Linda’s (and your) features.

Shot 1—no makeup. Shot 2—Max Factor Pancake 085 was smoothed in with a dampened sponge to give an even base. Shot 3—Linda’s eyebrows were brushed upwards and outwards with a dampened mascara brush to give them a better shape. Foundation was blended well into the eyelids and then a light dusting of face powder was added with the sponge, to give a non-greasy finish. White Shadow Pearl used with water and stroked on gently with a brush, was used to highlight immediately under the eyebrow. Then Smokey Grey shadow used with water and carefully applied with a brush was used all over the lid, and brought round under the eye. A little white shadow pearl at the very roots of the eyelash made the eye appear more blended in. Top lashes were mascaraed from underneath with Max Factor’s black mascara. Finally feather light strokes of soft brown pencil were used to shape the brows. The lashes used were very natural– Eylure’s See Through Lash No. I in brown. They were put on carefully with tweezers, starting in the middle, then pressed gently into place. Next the bottom lashes were mascaraed from above. Black Short Trim Underlashes were used because bottom lashes tend to look lighter. These were also applied with tweezers. Shot 4—Shading was done with brushes for best effect. Eylure do twelve brushes for £6.6s. Using the Eylure Face Shaper Kit, the makeup artist put white highlighter on the cheekbone and plenty of brown shaker in the hollow of the cheek. This was done with upswept brush strokes and blended in so that it didn’t look just like a dirty smudge. Then more highlight was used under the shaper to bring out the lower jaw and finally dark shaper again was used along the jawline and underneath to give the chin more definition. Shot 5—A delicate tinge of blusher was blended in just below the cheekbone. With some good brushwork Linda’s cheekbones were re-discovered. Shot 6.—The final look with Estee Lauder’s lipstick Walnut, glossed up with vaseline.

Beauty by Ann Morrow.

Tunic top with hood from Way-In.

Photographed by Chris Holland.

Scanned from Petticoat, 23rd January 1971.

Blue Baloo

1970s, barry lategan, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, pablo and delia, Revlon, Sue Baloo, Vogue
Model Sue Baloo, brightly glowing with Revlon’s Ultima 11 Dresden Peach Cream Foam smoothed over her face and neck, then dusted lightly with Transluscent Face Powder – her cheeks learning the blues in Lapis Blue eyeshadow from the new Silk Print Eye Collection, blending into its compact partner, Sari Pink on the eyelids with Carbon Blue Lash Makeup Automatic intensifying her grey eyes. Blue Baloo’s lips are smiling in Rich Rich Russet – a stunningly clear bright red from the Couture Lip Collection; her hair is drawn back by Oliver at Leonard under a leather, feather and wooden bead belt wound around her head of brilliant blue and yellow ochre with medallions painted in powder blue, by Pablo & Delia.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, February 1971.

Biba Cosmetics

1970s, biba, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

Sorry for the protracted absence over the past month. I realise I’m not the only one, but I have been experiencing serious fatigue from the events of the past year and I think the loss of Diana Rigg was some kind of final straw for me. I could see I was almost at the point of burning out and decided to take my foot off the pedal for a bit. But I get itchy fingers if I don’t scan for a while so I am gently starting up again, although it’s unlikely to be the same frequency as before. I’ve enjoyed the downtime too much and need to be careful with my mental health – as do we all!

I hope you’re all hanging in there ok, and that at the very least my archive has been of some distraction and enjoyment to you.

Biba cosmetics advert scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Make-up for white, pink and green

1970s, Buckle Under, dorothee bis, Hair and make-up, harpers and queen, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, james wedge, Make-up, Michaeljohn, Serge Lutens, wallis
Eyes are the focal point in this make-up for white by Serge Lutens of Christian Dior. Wide-brimmed black felt hat by Herbert Johnson.

This year you match your make-up to what you are wearing rather than to the colouring you were born with. Now, with the much greater variety of colours available, it is no longer blue for blue eyes, green for green eyes; or pink and white for blondes and gold-rachel tones for brunettes. You can have a new look for every day of the week, or different looks for day and night. In fact, you match your make-up to your clothes.

To show how much scope there is, we have taken one girl and given her three different make-ups created for each of this season’s new fashion colours.

Make-up for white by Serge Lutens. Make-up for Pink and Green by Mary Lou of The Face Place.

Hair by Pauline of Michaeljohn.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, early October 1971.

The make-up for pink incorporates all the new plum, mulberrt, grape and frosted pink make-up tones. Hat by Buckle Under. Pink jacket by Dorothee Bis.
For this season’s many shades of green there are lots of exciting new eye make-up colours. Emerald satin blazer by Wallis. Flowers from Bourne and Hollingsworth.