Mary gives men ideas

1970s, cosmopolitan, david bailey, Hair and make-up, Make-up, mary quant, vidal sassoon, Vintage Adverts
Advert for Mary Quant make-up and Havoc perfume.

Hair by Vidal Sassoon.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, December 1979.

A Room to Linger In

1970s, cosmopolitan, Harry Hartman, interior design, interiors, thea porter, Tim Street-Porter
Dishy model Michel Julien playing it cool in David Evers’ masculine bathroom.

The bathroom as an erogenous zone.

No room is more intimate than your bathroom. There is nowhere better to relax and get in the mood … to succumb to the sheer sensuality of soaking in scented water, indulging fantasies and anticipating future pleasures.

Your bathroom should be a place to feel beautiful in. to lacquer your toenails or finish a novel, henna your hair, water your plants or even paint a picture. No reason why it shouldn’t be your bathroom-boudoir-dressing-room-studio all in one. Even better if there’s room for a bed .. .

The bathroom is where you imprint your personality. Dare to be exotic with jungle prints, orchids growing in glass tanks. Or keep it cool with ice-white decor, stark modern art, a Japanese Bonsai tree.

Whatever your style, remember the importance of warmth, the comforting feel of thick pile rugs and heated towels. There’s no greater turn-off than getting goose pimples in a chilly cheerless bathroom. We photographed three highly individual bathrooms designed with great flair, and each styled perfectly for their owner’s lives. But all with a single thought in common—comfort.

The lure of the East for international fashion designer, Thea Porter. She designed her Mayfair bathroom with a Moorish interior in mind . . . wide built-in seats with heavily embroidered cushions. a little arch cut into the wall to display treasured objects. Thea doubles her exciting room as a studio, hangs her paintings around the walls.

If you want to please a man, model your bathroom on the one good-looking London businessman David Evers owns, with handsome polished mahogany fitted units, ivory backed brushes and green plants. David says the atmosphere reminds him of a St James’ men’s club.

The third is a fiery red hideaway, a fantastic design by Richard Ohrbach for New Yorker Cynthia Peltz. There’s more than a touch of the womb about this room—very comfortable after a hard day at the office …

Text by Joan Prust-Walters.

Photographs by Tim Street Porter.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, January 1974.

Our model Carole Augustine looks very relaxed in Thea Porter’s bathroom which is just like a Seraglio.
Cynthia PeIlls bathroom is a warm hideaway. (Photographed by Harry Hartman).

I’ve spread my wings since I discovered Smirnoff

1970s, cosmopolitan, smirnoff, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1974.

Why your clothes cost so much

1970s, airbrushing, biba, cosmopolitan, Illustrations, philip castle
“We all know prices are spiralling. You don’t need to study statistics to realise that your winter coat has cost you more, that sweaters, skirts, shoes and bags are now major investments. But why? And why so suddenly? “I remember when you could buy…” is no longer the prerogative of the middle aged reminiscing on lost youth. I remember when you could still buy a dress in Biba for just over £2, and, what’s more, I still wear it.”

A typically brilliant Philip Castle illustration to accompany an article by Shirley Flack on inflation and the effect on clothes prices at the time. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Although I would kill for the quality you were getting for your inflated prices in 1974. And, naturally, I always recommend shopping second hand anyway!

Illustration by Philip Castle.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, January 1974.

Kissin’ Cousins

1970s, alice springs, Anne Tyrrell, aquascutum, biba, Borg, Butler & Wilson, C&A, Chi Chi, cosmopolitan, crowthers, Deirdre McSharry, Diane Logan, Elle, Henry Lehr, Inspirational Images, jean varon, john bates, just men, marie france, medusa, miss mouse, ossie clark, quorum, Reldan, ritva, Sacha, Sujon, Vintage Editorials, Weathergay
Pink and wild coat is hooded and all set to trap the unwary male. Borg coat by Henry Lehr, £17.50, trousers by Sujon, £9.50. His coat by C & A in suedette, £13.95. Hat by Locke, £5.25.

. . . or how to wear furs this winter without hurting your pet’s feelings.

There is nothing, absolute nothing quite like wrapping yourself in fur. As a sensuous experience, it is in the same class as a new love, old champagne or fresh truffles. But even the most hedonistic of women are relieved that the threatened species are no longer imported. Snow leopards, tigers and other cats can go their own way and sensibly sybaritic female will look for furs that are farmed, such as fox and mink. This winter, too, the fakes are so wayout and wildly coloured that only a girl without a heart could resist their charms, albeit synthetic. Perhaps that’s why the fur trade have taken the hint and dipped their favourite fox pelts in the dye pot, Furrier Maxwell Croft offers his explanation of the female urge to wear and the male urge to bestow furs: “For many men it is a primitive desire to see his woman in furs.”. Very nice, too.

Plenty to scoff at the end of the copy there, but oh goodness the clothes – the clothes! And the glorious photography of Alice Springs, whose work doesn’t turn up nearly enough for my liking.

Fashion by Deirdre McSharry.

Photographed by Alice Springs.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1972.

Kissin’ cousin to a polar bear, but lots slimmer, is this smashing white shaggy coat. Wear it with white flannel bags, an angora sweater and an even shaggier hat. Well-cut coat in Borg with stitched suede edges. By Marie France for Quorum, £36, Ossie Clark trousers £14, sweater £4. Hat by Diane Logan, £5, shoes from Sacha £7.99. Beads by Butler and Wilson. Mike’s coat from Just Men, £70. Trousers from Aquascutum, £14.50.
The shaggiest coat story of the season-outrageous powder pink number, worn over pink striped sweater and pleated skirt. The dog is also fake, Chi Chi’s own and christened Fifi by Mike. Borg coat by Biba, £15, sweater by Reldan £3.33, skirt by Crowthers £5.75. Beads by Loewe.
Chi Chi turns her back on the world in scooped dress by John Bates for Jean Varon, £22. White shaggy jacket in Lister’s synthetic, £13.75 by Weathergay. Photographed at Julie’s Restaurant, 135 Portland Rd, London W11 (01-22) 8331).
How to have that movie-star feeling. If you want the big star treatment – breakfast at Tiffany’s, diamonds as big as the Ritz – dress like a star in electric blue fox. Dress by Elle, £15. Fox coat by Dinni for Femina Furs, £295. Moonstone necklace at Butler and Wilson. His outfit by Aquascutum. Velvet jacket £38.50, shirt £10.50, cuff links from £3 50, trousers £12.50
Tea for two. Mike makes up to Chi Chi (that’s the model girl, not the coat) in her shaggy yellow number, worn with shiny striped shirt and mustard bags. Borg coat by Marie France for Quorum £23.50, shirt by Medusa £5.50, trousers by Sujon £9.50. Beads by Butler and Wilson. Photographed at The Royal Garden Hotel, London.
Enough to drive a man wild-a nutty fake fur, above right, with Fifties shoulders and swing back. Wear it nicely over mustard crêpe de chine shirt and peg-top trousers. Both by Sujon, shirt £13, trousers £9.50. Borg coat by Biba £25, beret, Diane Logan, £4.50, shoes, Sacha, £7.99. His coat, Aquascutum, £70, trousers C & A £3 95.
Enough to make Morgan the gorilla, jealous. (Remember A Suitable Case For Treatment?) Emerald green gorilla jacket in real-life Borg by Weathergay, £9.50 (right). Worn over slinky knit sweater and skirt from Ritva, £27 for the outfit. Blue shaggy beret by Diane Logan, £4.50. Mike’s sweater in blue and silver by Ritva, £18.50. Trousers from C & A £5.50.
Jealous cats show their ruffled furs. Chi Chi and Belinda act out the classic movie-star confrontation in their sequins and furs, Chi Chi in pleated taffeta with sequin bodice by Anne Tyrell for John Marks, £23.95; her boa is silver fox, ranch bred, price £70. Belinda’s fox is red, also from the ranch, price £45, both by Barbara Warner for Fab Furs. Strapless top and trousers by Miss Mouse, £20. Beads by Loewe.

Relax You’re Looking Good

1970s, cosmopolitan, disco, Lotus, Rock Follies, shoes, Swanky Modes, Vintage Adverts

Something of a Rock Follies influence here, plus I’m pretty sure that’s a Swanky Modes dress on the left.

(Tag yourself, I’m the Kiss Me t-shirt and Hussar boots…)

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, October 1978.

Sheer Romanticism

1970s, cosmopolitan, lingerie, loungewear, Vintage Adverts, Walker Reid
Nighty nighties are fine, filmy and thoroughly feminine. In seductive see-through shades like damson, russet, purple and black. Long and lovely, sheer and sexy. It’s quite transparent, Nighty Nighties are made for the romantic at heart.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1975.

Natural Wonder

1970s, cosmopolitan, Hair and make-up, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

It’s waterproof, smudge-proof and fade-proof too! Natural Wonder has a completely new kind of eyeshadow that doesn’t crease. It’s simply called ‘Crease-Proof Cream Eyeshadow’. All day long it stays smooth, fresh and pretty. Colour just won’t creep into creases. Won’t fade or streak, it’s even waterproof. In lots of gorgeous Natural Wonder colours.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1975.

Bunch of Pinks

1970s, biba, bill klein, cosmopolitan, Erika Bergmann, hair, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, john kelly, Make-up

Cover picture of Erika Bergmann by John Kelly. Erika is wearing our Cosmo fluffy feather jacket offer – exclusive to Cosmo readers. Turn to page 99 for details. Eriika’s pink and silver lame dress, £9, pink bangle 55p, bunch of pinks 25p, all from Biba, Kensington High St, W8. Hair is arranged by Pauline of Michaeljohn, the make-up by Biba; eyes are shadowed with Havana Brown powder tint over Havana Brown gloss, with Sugar Pink powder under the eyebrows. The false lashes are Brown Spiders and the lipstick is Sugar Pink topped with lipgloss. The tan is the model’s own work.

Photographed by John Kelly (cover) and Bill Klein (feature).

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, September 1972.

Somebody, somewhere, said it was a wedding or something

1970s, Advertorials, Arthur Hill, cosmopolitan, jim lee, ossie clark, Random Ossies in Adverts, Vintage Adverts

A curious but beautifully shot advertorial from a copy of Cosmopolitan, which I think is meant to be advertising the drink but is also rather a charming portrayal of a bohemian Seventies wedding. Unsurprising given that Jim Lee is behind the photographs, and also featuring a couple of Ossie Clark dresses, which I’m always happy to document.

Photographed by Jim Lee and Arthur Hill for Blanc Foussy by Grants of St James’s.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, August 1974.