Move in, Move on

1970s, cosmopolitan, Dominique Depalle, interior design, interiors, Michael Boys
Dominique’s bath can be replumbed when she moves; a wall-hanging can be more easily removed than tiles.

You may hate to be tied down by your possessions, but naturally you get attached to them. For a more flexible life-style, learn from Dominique Depalle and choose furnishing that moves where she does.

If you’ve spent longer in France than a weekend, you’ve probably noticed that most French girls have a greater sense of style by the time they are twenty than the rest of us will ever acquire. Instead of always trying to beat those clever ladies in the style stakes—and not quite succeeding — we should swallow our English pride and learn from them. Take Parisian Dominique Depalle, for instance, who has cunningly transformed a drab studio flat—the equivalent of a big-city bedsit or rented flat in a dingy Victorian house—into a warm, feminine home that looks as though it might have cost a fortune, but didn’t, thanks to Dominique’s experience as an antique dealer. She has a sharp eye for spotting bargains in junk. Dominique recently gave up her job in advertising to turn her hobby—collecting antiques—into a full-time occupation. Like Dominique, most girls in their late teens and twenties expect to swop flats, jobs, even cities, several times. Dominique decorates on the sensible principle that if she’s going to move on, she should be able to take all her favourite possessions with her when she goes. There’s not a fitted carpet, built-in cupboard or roll of wallpaper in the place. Dominique chooses every item with infinite care because she knows that each object will last a lifetime… like the Victorian bath, which could easily be transported with the help of a friendly lorry driver, and replumbed in another flat ; the huge tiger wall-hanging, not as practical as tiles, maybe, but then you can’t start taking down the tiles every time you have an altercation with your landlord. A bundle of small objects—baskets, ornaments and framed photographs—will pack easily into a suitcase. And by keeping walls plain wherever she goes, Dominique can be certain that her intricate wall-hangings, pictures and flowery bed-coverings will blend with every setting. Dominique dreams of eventually having a proper house—with a staircase, a loft and a cellar for apples and wine. Meanwhile she longs for adventure in her life and is thinking of going to live in Africa for a few years. If you, like Dominique, get itchy feet after more than a few months in the same place—but still want somewhere pretty to come home to —remember that your possessions should be as mobile as you are.

Photographed by Michael Boys.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1977.

Favourite objects show off Dominique’s individual style.
With plain walls, flowery fabrics blend in any room.
Dominique sells antiques at work and buys them for a hobby. Evenings at home are spent restoring her miniature replicas of old furniture

Polaroid Lookers

1970s, cosmopolitan, Polaroid, Sunglasses, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, April 1979.

Is there anything you can’t wear?

1970s, Ace, cosmopolitan, Daily Blue, Midas, Vintage Adverts
Silver jumpsuit Dailyblue at Ace, boots Midas, reassurance by Panty Pads.

Sanpro goes New Wave! Of course this image is far too good for a Dr. White’s advert really.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1977.

Great shakes!

1970s, Adrian Mann, Asprey, Bugatti, Cocktails, cosmopolitan, eric boman, Inspirational Images, Jane Cattlin, liberty, liberty's
Her dress by Jane Cattlin. Necklace by Adrien Mann. His clothes at Bugatti. Cocktail accessories from Asprey and Liberty. Hair by Tony at Molton Brown.

Celebrate the Great Cocktail Revival. Try your hand at shaking drinks, just as those ‘Thirties movie heroes used to do. Rather more than prettily coloured drinks, cocktails can pack quite a lethal punch, so we’ve included some recipes that will let you drink and drive.

Well that’s my Friday night sorted, let me know if you try any yourself!

Photographed by Eric Boman.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, June 1975.

“Cocktails create good vibes in dark times,” says Peter Morton who runs London’s trendiest cocktail bar, Morton’s, to which all the models, photographers and other celebrities flock after a hard day under the arc lights. You can fix cocktails in the soothing surroundings of your own home—and at half the price—if you’re willing to take a little trouble. The one instrument you must invest in if you want to make a perfect cocktail is a cocktail shaker. Lots of the big stores are stocking them now and prices at Selfridges start at £4.65 for a plastic shaker, £6 for a more aesthetic stainless steel number. All cocktails should be mixed with plenty of ice and you must use fresh ice every time you shake up a new round of drinks, otherwise they’ll taste watery. Decorate cocktails with pieces of fresh fruit—lemons, limes and oranges—and maraschino cherries on sticks. All the recipes below were supplied by barman extraordinaire Arnold of Widow Applebaum’s, South Molton St, London W1. Now start shaking . . .

Flaming mad. That’s me.

1970s, cosmopolitan, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, May 1976.

Our Latest Hot Prediction

1970s, cosmopolitan, Russell & Bromley, shoes, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, April 1976.

Piccadilly Pierrot

1970s, cosmopolitan, Inspirational Images, Jane Cattlin, pierrot, Simpson of Piccadilly, Vintage Adverts

Pure silk pierrot suit by Jane Cattlin.

Photographed at Simpson Jermyn Street.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, October 1978.

Flora

1970s, cosmopolitan, Medway, shoes, Uncategorized, Vintage Adverts, Willie Christie

Photographed by Willie Christie.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, December 1979.

One Hundred Years of The Liberty Look

1970s, art nouveau, Bevis Hillier, cosmopolitan, Illustrations, Inspirational Images, liberty, liberty's, Sumiko

(Illustrating an article on Liberty and their centenary by Bevis Hillier)

Illustration by Sumiko.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, June 1975.

The Soft Touch

1970s, annacat, Ballantyne, Buckle Under, C&A, coopers, cosmopolitan, Deirdre McSharry, Fenwick, Herbert Johnson, Ian Knipe, Inspirational Images, irvine sellars, Janet Ibbotson, Jasper, jean varon, Jenny Harrington, john bates, John Craig, john kelly, Samm, Spectrum, terry de havilland, The Purple Shop, Trille, Turnbull & Asser, Vintage Editorials
Just the jacket, for interviewing the gardener… if he’s as handsome as Ian Knipe. Trille does the Lady Bountiful bit in yellow and a romantic hat. Jacket C&A £9.95, felt hat by Herbert Johnson, pearls by Ciro. Yellow angora sweater by John Craig, £2.10.

There is a licence to touch all the clothes on these pages. There is not a single trad, scratchy, thornproof tweed among any of the frankly tactile silks, angoras and flannels of autumn. Jerseys and pearls and sensible shoes were once the uniform of the WI. Now, (well) kept ladies whose fingers smell of “Cabochard” rather than cabbage, are pressing their flannel bags, having their pearls restrung and are wearing them with shirts so unbuttoned they could catch pneumonia – and heels high enough to rise above the muddiest farmyard. They are taking to pleated kilts, and cashmere sweaters so tight they’d enliven the dullest game of backgammon. Dinner dresses are back in style, and I do mean back down as far as you can go. Properly and provocatively dressed, a weekend in the country might be more fun than you think.

Hair arranged for all pictures by Carl of Molton Brown.

Fashion by Deirdre McSharry.

Photographed by John Kelly.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, October 1972.

Give into the call of the wild, but come on softly in silk, angora and flannel. Jenny Harrington sends Ian Knipe slightly wild in her silk shirt, £15, flannel bags £16.50 by Annacat, and angora cardigan, John Craig £5. Fish pendant by Ciro. Ian’s camelhair sweater Ballantyne, £11.50. (Inset: The smoothest tweed in the softest shape will make you want to throw away your old trench. A great way to look for opening bazaars – and coping with Mellors. Coat by Coopers £33, hat by Herbert Johnson, £8.95.)
What would the WI say? Trille lolls about in cashmere sweater, skirt and pearls- -and shoes too high for country lawns. Sweater £11, skirt £30, both by Ballantyne. Pearls by Ciro. Shoes by Samm, £7.50.
Who’s for backgammon? Trille and Jenny get down to it (right) in necklines that ought to fetch the men from their port, on the double. Trille in red jersey dinner dress, John Bates for Jean Varon £16.75, shoes by Terry de Havilland £15.95, pearls by Ciro. Jenny in cream satin shirt by Coopers, £8, and pleated plaid skirt, Gor-Ray f11.95. Red shoes by Samm, £7.50.
The sporting life means quick repairs on the run. Jenny puts back the paint, stays ladylike in powder soft suede and silk. Jacket and skirt by Janet Ibbotson; the jacket costs £38, the skirt £33.50. Silk shirt Fenwicks, £11.50. Jewellery and shagreen compact from The Purple Shop. Shoes by Samm, £7.95.
Long weekends can lead to explosive situations – Jenny ignites something in her cashmere and kilt. Sweater by Ballantyne £13.50, skirt by Gor-Ray £11.95, shoes by Terry de Havilland £15.95. Pearls by Ciro. Ian in ruffled lawn shirt, Turnbull and Asser £11.75, check trousers Irvine Sellars £5.95.
By dawn’s early light a lady likes to relax. Ian wears C & A velvet suit £28; Trille in taffeta skirt and blouse, £5.50 each from Spectrum. Rose 84p from Spectrum. Shoes by Terry de Havilland, £12.99.
The softest touch of all is this mohair sweater (right), and a far cry from the clumpy rustic knits we used to wear. Jenny puts the new country clothes together gently—pink sweater, Buckle Under £12, pink wool skirt, Spectrum £6.95, hat by Herbert Johnson £7.50. Ian’s shirt by Jasper £5.50, check trousers £6.95 by Irvine Sellars. (Inset: Soft again —cream flannel blouse and satin trousers whipped up with beads and roses. Jenny’s blouse £5.50, trousers £5.50, flowers 84p, all from Spectrum. Ian’s blue shirt by Mr Harry £7.65.)