The Finer Things

1970s, accessories, Butler & Wilson, Diane Logan, Essences, Essenses, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, John Craig, Jon Elliot, Ricci Burns, Roger Charity, Rosie Nice, Vintage Editorials
Flower and net trimmed blocked felt perchers. Both may be hired and viewed at the Diane Logan Hat Museum Department, 40 Chiltern Street, W1. Lace umbrella to hire from Essences.

Add a touch of delicate, soft lace trimming to your clothes and accessories this summer for a really feminine, fragile look.

Hair by Colin at Ricci Burns.

Photographed by Roger Charity.

Scanned from Honey, May 1974.

Floor-length satin cross-over robe with fine lace trim and button-through neck, £12.50 from a selection of originals at Essences, 410 King’s Road, SW3.
Pin-striped cotton pouch hag with antique lace trim and pearl clasp, £5 from Rosie Nice, 12 Clifton Road, W9. Coffee nylon lace gloves with button trim, F G Shave approx 90p, from D H Evans.
Patchwork embroidery and lace, satin-lined cotton bag, £5 from Rosie Nice, 12 Clifton Road, W9.
Coffee and cream lace-trimmed loose blouse with tie-waist and ruched shoulders, matching square-neck top with shoestring straps, John Craig £8.50, from Just Looking, King’s Road, SW3 an branches ; Stop the Shop. King’s Road, SW3. Mother-of-pearl necklace, Butler & Wilson £5.50
Cotton gingham camisole top with broderie anglaise trim and long matching button-through flounced skirt, Jaki Ross at Jon Elliot £18.90, from Merle, 42 Thurloe Street, SW7 ; Jane Norman, 153 Oxford Street, WI , Super Star, Leeds; Quids In, Canterbury. China necklace, Rosie Nice 80p; carved rose bangle £1.25, Baggage & General at Peter Robinson.
Black string lace gloves with fine multi-coloured stripes £3.50, from a selection at Essences, 410 King’s Road, SW3. Black lace wide-brimmed hat with red rose, Diane Logan, £5, from Diane Logan, 40 Chiltern Street, W1.

Tutti Frutti

1970s, biba, corocraft, Fenwick, Honey Magazine, Jean Howell, Joseph, liberty, miss mouse, moss bros, outlander, Roger Charity, Russell & Bromley, Sacha, Suzuya, Vintage Editorials
Striped chenille sloppy joe, Suzuya from Joseph. Trousers from Miss Mouse. Scarf from Fenwick. Mules from Russell & Bromley. Poppy earclips from Corocraft.

Ski pants, socks and hot tops – a fresh look for the future with a little help from the past.

Photographed by Roger Charity.

Scanned from Honey, May 1975.

Tightly waisted cotton canvas jacket with bamboo fastenings and cotton canvas tapered trousers both by Miss Mouse. Printed silk scarf from Fenwick. Leather wedge heeled mules from Russell & Bromley.
Ice cream coloured finely striped sweater with slash neck and sleeves and tightly ribbed waist by Outlander. Navy cotton canvas trousers with red contrast stitching by Miss Mouse. Shocking pink kerchief from Liberty. Bright pink knitted ankle socks by Jean Howell. Black suedee and cork wedge sandals with embroidery by Sacha.
Blue and pink striped velour slash-neck top with batwing sleeves and plum leather belt with oval wooden buckle, both from Biba. Scarlet stretch ski pants from Moss Bros. Navy leather wedge mules from Russell & Bromley. Long striped scarf from Liberty. Gilt flower earclips from Corocraft.
Loose cotton short sleeved blouse from Liberty. Jet black ski slacks from Moss Bros. Shocking pink chiffon scarf from Biba. Knitted ankle socks from Jean Howell. PAtent peep toe wedge heeled shoes from Russell & Bromley. Poppy earclips from Corocraft.

We Gotta Whole Lotta Sole

1970s, Honey Magazine, platforms, Russell & Bromley, shoes, stockings, Vintage Adverts

Yes please x 3

Advert for Russell & Bromley scanned from Honey, October 1972.

Swaggering In

1970s, biba, bus stop, Denis Peel, Dolcis, Honey Magazine, John Craig, lee bender, lilley and skinner, manolo blahnik, Martha Hill, ravel, Richard Shops, Russell & Bromley, Sheraton, Vintage Editorials, zapata
Bold zi g zag pure wool swagger coat with sailor collar by Sheraton. Polo neck sweater by John Craig. Navy tights by Mary Quant. Peep toe ankle strap shoes by Biba. / Swirly blanket check coat with pleated back by Bus Stop. Suede sunray shoes by Dolcis. Both pairs of gloves by Kir.

The incredible swagger is back. We all know you’ve seen it before, hidden away in mother’s wardrobe, but forget the mothball version and look out for bold stripes, zig-zags and checks in bright primary colours. The difference is that these coats have neat tight-fitting shoulders and wide swirling skirts which swing when you walk-surprisingly flattering and easy to wear. So let the wind blow, all you need is a flash of panache and a splash of colour.

Photographed by Denis Peel.

Scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Window pane check swagger coat by Martha Hill. Lemon tights by Twiggy. Suede ‘Garbo’ shoes by Ravel. / Ritzy scarlet shaggy coat with wide swinging back by Martha Hill. Glace kid leather shoes by Zapata.
Bottle green and yellow McNeal tartan swagger coat by Richard Shops. Black leather shoes by Russell and Bromley. Navy leather shoulder bag by Biba. / Sage green wool tweed swagger coat by Elgee. Rust and burgundy suede shoes by Lilley and Skinner. Bottle green suede bag by Biba.

The Kaleidoscopic Knit Show

2007, Adrian Mann, Alain Walsh, Barnett, clowns, crowthers, Dranella, erica budd, Flair, Hedgehog, Henry Miura, Honey Magazine, Jasper, jeff banks, John Craig, Joseph, mary quant, mr freedom, Originelle, sally levison, Smart'n'Tartan, st honore, Tabu, Vintage Editorials, wallis
Jet black pullover with fluted cap sleeves, Barnett from Wakeford’s, King’s Road, SW3. Billowing sleeved crepe shirt, St Honore. / Stripey Acrilan sweater, Tabu, from Originelle Gloucester Road, SW7. Tangerine crepe shirt, St Honore; ship brooch, Mr Freedom; striped cloche, Levison Originals. Both shirts from Flair, Golders Green Road.

Brighter and brighter, the new brand of knits is coming. Bolder than ever, with huge batwing sleeves, flaring kimono arms and rainbow stripes. Piled on top of one another or over a striking shirt – without any doubt the greatest knits ever seen.

I don’t know about you, but clown and circus-influenced editorials are one of my favourite themes and really quite a staple of the late Sixties and early Seventies youth magazine boom.

Photographed at Foire & Cirque de Rancy, France.

Photographed by Alain Walch.

Scanned from Honey, February 1972.

Khaki wool cricket sweater, Miura from Hedgehog, 135 Fulham Road, SW3. Strawberry-patterned cotton shit, Dranella. / Ice cream coloured Acrylic sweater, Jeff Banks from 2007, Oxford Street, W1. Ladybird cotton shirt, Jasper.
Square necked acrylic sweater, Erica Budd. Full sleeved crepe shirt, St Honore. / Patriotic striped Acrylic sweater from Crowthers, Kensington High Street, W8. Patchwork print cotton shirt, Jasper from Sidney Smith, King’s Road, SW3.
Bright red batwing Orlon sweater, Erica Budd. Ladybird cotton shirt, Jasper. Moon and star plastic brooch, Adrien Mann. / Confetti spotted and striped pullover and scarlet vest, both by John Craig from Joseph, King’s Road, SW3. Lemon brooch, Paul Stephens; bee brooch, Adrien Mann.
Kingfisher blue sweater, Erica Budd from Smart’n’Tartan, Upwest, Oxford Street W1. Goldfish brooch, Adrien Mann. / Navy sweater with small batwing sleeves, Mary Quant from Dickens & Jones. Wild strawberry cotton shirt, Dranella.
Pillar box red and bright yellow Dralon sweater from Wallis. / Navy, scarlet and light blue Acrylic sweater, John Craig from 2007 Oxford Street, W1.

Biba Cosmetics

1970s, biba, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

Sorry for the protracted absence over the past month. I realise I’m not the only one, but I have been experiencing serious fatigue from the events of the past year and I think the loss of Diana Rigg was some kind of final straw for me. I could see I was almost at the point of burning out and decided to take my foot off the pedal for a bit. But I get itchy fingers if I don’t scan for a while so I am gently starting up again, although it’s unlikely to be the same frequency as before. I’ve enjoyed the downtime too much and need to be careful with my mental health – as do we all!

I hope you’re all hanging in there ok, and that at the very least my archive has been of some distraction and enjoyment to you.

Biba cosmetics advert scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Necking

1970s, biba, Chester Martin, christa peters, Honey Magazine, ika hindley, Inspirational Images, Jacqmar, Jasper, jeff banks, John Dove and Molly White, novelty prints, Ronnie Stirling, stirling cooper, Turnbull & Asser, Vintage Editorials
Hollywood film star printed cotton satin shirt by John Dove and Molly White for Jasper. Pure silk herringbone tie by Turnbull and Asser.

These are the ties that go with the shirts that are all part of the big 40s revival. Floppy silky shirts with subtly embossed patterns, and ties and scarves galore; they can be tied in bows, pinned with brooches, loosely knotted or worn like the men do. In fact, as long as they trail elegantly down the front of your shirt you can wear these ties just any way you like.

As a dedicated fan of long silk scarves (and silky blouses, and novelty brooches in fact) I’m just taking this editorial as my one stop guide to getting dressed this autumn.

Photographed by Christa Peters.

Possibly modelled by Ika Hindley (it looks like her mouth).

Scanned from Honey, October 1971.

Striped embossed crepe de chine blouse by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Paisley silk scarf by Chester Martin. Cicada brooch from Biba.
Feathers crepe de chine blouse by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Long spotted silk scarf by Chester Martin.
Avocado green crepe de chine blouse with fern pattern by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Silk chevron kipper tie by Turnbull and Asser. Egyptian stock pin from Biba.
Wavy patterned jacquard shirt by Jeff Banks. Printed silk scarf by Chester Martin. Sea horse brooch from Biba.
Flower embossed chocolate brown jacquard shirt by Jeff Banks. Long silk art deco scarf by Jacqmar. Flying eagle brooch from Biba.

Cruising

1970s, Bernie & Clare, Charles Batten, Honey Magazine, monty coles, Sujon, Vintage Editorials
Fine knitted dirndl skirt, with matching cap-sleeved cardigan jacket and skimpy halter neck sun top, straw sun hat, all by Bernie & Clare for Hamilton Cruise.

Photographed by Monty Coles.

Scanned from Honey, May 1975.

Brightly striped fine knitted cotton skirt with elasticated waist, loose cardigan jacket, straw sun hat with cut out crown, all by Bernie & Clare for Hamilton Cruise. Lemon shawl tied as a sun top, from Biba.
Cornflower blue, yellow and white striped crepe de chine cardigan jacket, front pleated skirt and long scarf (tied as sun top) all from Sujon. White straw hat from Charles Batten.

Anarchists go their own sweet way

alice pollock, beauty, biba, gala, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Jill Harley, kari ann muller, Make-up, Steve Hiett

They break boring beauty traditions and riot lip colours go on eyes, eye colours go on lips. Upside down- Quite contrary. And why not? Make-up was getting so dreary. We just stuck to the rules and slicked warm colours—pink, amber, soft orange—on our mouths, and cool colours—grey, green, blue, brown—on our eyes. Till now. Till the anarchists started this new groove. Now things are happening. Putting on a face isn’t a daily chore to be done as quickly as possible. Make-up is something to enjoy. It’s art. Total fun. Total fantasy. After all, painting on warm mobile skin is so much more exciting than .cold fiat paper or canvas. Come, join the anarchy party and experiment with colour. Sit down this evening in front of a well-lit mirror, not the telly, and design surprise eyes.

Alice Pollock (top) says she would like to be invisible (can’t think why) and her favourite perfume is Chanel No. 5. She has tried every hair colour under the sun, including green, but she’s glad it’s her own shade now—”At least I know who I am when I wake up.” Every morning she washes it in the bath with Boots Herbal Shampoo, 2s. 11d. On her eye-lids she paints Leichner’s Ivory Stick No. 5, 5s. 3d., and then an arc of pale green under the brow and round along the cheek-bone. Her lip-colour is a mixture of the same Leichner stick and Christian Dior’s Sepia 61 lipstick, 15s.


Moon (centre left, whose real name is Constance Mullens and who was nicknamed after a South African cartoon character called Moon Mullens) wears Mary Quant’s Citrus Jeepers Peepers, 18s. 7d., on her eye-lids and a purple Caran D’ache water crayon all round the eyes to tone with her hair which is cleverly coloured mauve and butterscotch by Erik and styled by Herta at Vidal Sassoon, Grosvenor House; 01-629 2463. Her favourite perfume is jasmin and, asked what the most vital beauty product is, she said, “a razor.”


Gala Mitchell (centre right) is a beautifully original actress. You may have seen her before in Ken Russell’s television film about the Pre-Raphaelites. Her most treasured beauty product is lipstick. Here she’s wearing Biba’s purple lip-tint, 5s., with black liner round her mouth. She uses more of Revlon’s Natural Wonder Lid Liners, 17s. 6d., to paint intriguing black spots across part of her face to symbolise a veil, and then twists a string of blue curls, tinted by Erik, amongst her copper hair which she keeps in place with two ’40s tortoiseshell hair-combs.


Kari Ann Moller (bottom left) says she wants to look like the wicked witch in fairy tales, yet she loves cosy perfumes like Apple Blossom and Lily of the Valley (Coty’s Muguet des Bois Creamy Skin Parfum, 17s. 6d.), and she couldn’t live without Nivea. “I found an old purple crayon in my boyfriend’s car—he’s a painter—so I’m wearing purple with a dab of lipstick and Leichner silver sparklers on my eyes today, plus tart red lipstick by Elizabeth Arden.” Her soft ginger wig is by Ricci Burns, 151 Kings Rd., S.W.3.


Jill Harley (bottom right) never wears fake eyelashes now, she’s only interested in colour: Chrome stick by Leichner.. 5s. 3d., with Gait orange paint near the socket line and Dorothy Gray’s Light-Up Yellow lipstick, 11s. 6d., as a highlighter for her eyes. Woltz ltaliana’s pale green polish, Laguna, goes on her nails to match up with her pale green wellingtons. Instead of expensive face-shapers, she brushes on Miners’ Frosted Brown Powder Eye Shadow, 2s. 10d. For her lips, she mixes an old red lipstick with Boots 17 Shiny Brown Eye Shadow Stick, 2s. 6d.

Two of my favourite models + one of my favourite designers + some wild 1970 make-up = happy Liz.

Photographed by Steve Hiett.

Scanned from Honey, September 1970.

Last Tango in Tijuana

1970s, antony price, che guevara, Dinah Adams, Dolcis, gillian richard, granny takes a trip, Herbert Johnson, Honey Magazine, Ian Batten, Inspirational Images, jean junction, Martha Hill, miss mouse, polly peck, rae spencer cullen, Roy A. Giles, Russell & Bromley, Samm, Spectrum, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials, wallis

If you can’t tango, simply steal into the spotlight in these flamboyant rumba dresses. The slipped shoulder strap, the bared midriff and the full-blown flouncy skirts all spell out the sexiest numbers for summer.

The main difference between the content of a magazine like Honey, as opposed to Vogue or Queen, is that the designers tend to be the more intriguing and less well-known of the period. If you want names like Miss Mouse, Granny Takes a Trip or Antony Price, these magazines should always be your first port of call. This shoot alone features one of my Holy Grail pieces by Granny Takes a Trip: the ruffled tie front top and skirt ensemble designed by Dinah Adams. Previously a designer for two other cult London boutiques, Mr Freedom and Paradise Garage, painfully little is known about Dinah Adams (misattributed as ‘Diana’ in the original credits). Which is why it’s always lovely to see her work represented anywhere.

Also shown here is a frothy, frilly delight of a frock by Miss Mouse, a.k.a Rae Spencer-Cullen. A personal favourite of mine, the Miss Mouse aesthetic is precisely why this early Seventies period is my favourite for fashion. Her work was heavily Fifties-inspired, quite ahead of the curve in the scheme of things, but always with a novel twist. Spencer-Cullen is yet another designer whose life remains something of a mystery, despite being a part of a hugely influential circle which included artists Duggie Fields and Andrew Logan. It seems that this anonymity was (at least initially) intentional, as an article from the Glasgow Herald in 1976 declared.

“At first, six years ago, when presenting her quirky designs on fashion, she seemed shy and utterly retiring. Miss Mouse could not be contacted easily by the press. She was elusive, hazed in shadows, a real mouse about publicity in fact. The only evidence of her entire existence was her clothes.”

In a world where we are so used to having information at our fingertips, there is something quite enchanting about this; tiny scraps must be stitched together to create a flimsy silhouette of a creative genius.

Photographed by Roy A Giles.

Scanned from Honey, July 1973.

(Please note – this blog originally appeared in 2016 on Shrimpton Couture’s ‘Curated’ blog project which has since been removed. It seemed a shame to let the posts disappear completely so I hope to eventually repost all my work here.)

Rose-strewn wrapover cotton bolero and long frilled skirt from Spectrum. Raffia and cotton tie belt by Herbert Johnson. Right: Tightly ruched off-the-shoulder top and long skirt with deeply riched waistband from Wallis.
Ritzy ruffled satin bolero top with frilled skirt by Dinah Adams for Granny Takes a Trip. Wavy leather sandals by Samm. Right: Slinky spotted Tricel dress by Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper. Crackly taffeta long flounced skirt by Antony Price for Che Guevara. Wooden and patent sandals by Russell & Bromley.
Flouncy black and white gingham off-the-shoulder dress printed with orange and lemon flowers by Gillian Richard. Canary yellow sandals by Samm. Embroidered cummerbund by Herbert Johnson.
Swirling striped cotton skirt by Jean Junction. Off-the-shoulder pleated blouse by Martha Hill. Polished leather boots from Dolcis.
Black cotton ruched and flared rumba dress printed with multi-coloured flowers and birds by Miss Mouse. Apple green shoes by Russell & Bromley.

Left: Crisp cotton gingham blouse and flounced skirt both by Martha Hill. Oval bead choker and bangles by Paul Stephens. Right: Ruffled cotton check blouse and tiered skirt by Polly Peck. Cummerbund by Herbert Johnson. Shoes by Russell & Bromley.