Lothars of St. Tropez

1970s, Escalade, Lothars of St. Tropez, mild sauce, Vintage Adverts, Vogue
If you can find these Lothars casuals anywhere else in London, we’ll buy them for you.

Hand-dyed shirts and pants by Lothars of St. Tropez. Shirt: £10.10.0. Pants: £9.10.0. Escalade, 187/191 Brompton Road, Knightsbridge.

Scanned from Vogue, February 1971.

Kaffe Fassett’s Peony and Mosaic Bedroom

1970s, horrockses, interior design, interiors, James Mortimer, Kaffe Fassett, sanderson, Vogue

Starting with the pale pink of peonies for the walls, Kaffe Fassett built a room of mosaic and flower patterns. Inside the arch: a bed with Gazebo sheets from the new Horrockses’ Wamsutta range. Oriental carpets from Franses of Piccadilly. Strips of mosaic pattern from Sanderson wallpapers. Paintings, needlework cushion by Kaffe Fassett. The shower cubicle, Tahiti by Leisure, a surprise in a bedroom, but it fits. Horrockses’ towels. Porcelain pots, shells and shell boxes, cane and lacquer furniture. Patchwork quilts.

Photographed by James Mortimer.

Scanned from Vogue, February 1975.

Aloha

1970s, Adrian Mann, clive arrowsmith, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Make-up, Max Factor, pat cleveland, Vogue, yves saint laurent

Gauguin got the message and in every island from Tonga to Tahiti, from Fiji to the Ile des Pins to Hawaii, his pictures come to life with beautiful girls in vivid sarongs, necks encircled with leis . . Here, Gil of Max Factor brings South Sea sun and warmth to the January ’72 face with Moisturized Nouveau Beige Whipped Creme Make-up, Honey Translucent Powder and Pinki Cake Rouge. Adds brilliance of hibiscus flowers to lips with Sunset Rose Lipstick and California Transparent Lip Gloss … and to the eyes with Clear Red Creme Rouge, lots of Transparent Lip Gloss, Grey Automatic Eye Pencil and Black Mascara Wand. Hair by John at Leonard, printed chiffon shawl by Saint Laurent Rive Gauche; earrings by Adrien Mann. Flowers by Pulbrook & Gould.

Model is Pat Cleveland.

Photographed by Clive Arrowsmith.

Scanned from Vogue, January 1972.

Emilio Pucci at Fortnum & Mason

1960s, fortnum and mason, Pucci, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Scanned from Vogue, December 1968.

Veiled lady, Garbo-style

1970s, barry lategan, biba, Inspirational Images, Make-up, pablo and delia, Vogue
A boa of black and white feathers, made especially for Vogue by Pablo & Delia, with make-up by Biba.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, December 1970.

What a Rip Off

1970s, lothar schmid, Vogue, zandra rhodes

If you haven’t a rag to your name, there is now Zandra Rhodes’ jersey, ripped, slashed and blue’stitched into her personal view of punk. She calls it “conceptual chic”. In style she thinks it is the first time the seventies have shown themselves. It is no holds barred style.

Mean streak of black jersey, this page, and another, opposite T-shirt shape under ragged tunic. All with blue cotton stitching, chains, ball bearings, safety pins, random diamante. All from Zandra Rhodes ; The Zandra Rhodes Shop at Harrods. Jersey by Racine. Very high heel gold sandals, Manolo Blahnik for Zapata. Hair by Fabian at Jean Louis David.

Photographed by Lothar Schmid.

Scanned from Vogue, September 1977.

Women Who Know

1970s, Hermès, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Vintage Adverts, Vogue
Les femmes décidées vont jusqu’au bout… Jusqu’au Parfum.

Just a pretty flawless aesthetic which I felt needed to be noted.

Advert for Calèche by Hermès.

Scanned from Vogue, November 1971.

the pillbox

Browns, guy bourdin, hats, Inspirational Images, karl lagerfeld, Manuella Papatakis, Moravetz, Vogue

Here are the beginnings of a new silhouette and a new face, eyeliner, lipstick, not much mascara, a little rouge. Hair sleeked away somewhere. The hat: an uncompromising pillbox tipped over one eyebrow. Get used to it now, before anyone else.

Both hats by Karl Lagerfeld for Chloe, at Browns.

Veiling from John Lewis. Necklace, £6.75, Butler & Wilson.

Hair by Regis at Mods Hair, Paris.

Make-up by Moravetz.

Photographed by Guy Bourdin.

Scanned from Vogue, August 1972.

Black cire draped pillbox on Manuella Papatakis, daughter of Anouk Aimee.

The Smith Spectacular

1970s, Christopher Vane Percy, Henry Clarke, interior design, interiors, leonard, Vogue, zandra rhodes
Maxine Smith in the bedroom, where the four-poster is set on a mirrored podium. Her satin nightdress and jacket by Zandra Rhodes. Hair by Celine at Leonard.

DRESSED BY ZANDRA RHODES STAGED BY MAXINE SMITH

Maxine and Gary Smith moved to London from New York in 1971. Since then, Gary Smith, American television producer and winner of several Emmy Awards, has been working with Sir Lew Grade on television spectaculars, and Maxine Smith has been planning their London flat with Zandra Rhodes. The combination of their ideas has worked perfectly, with one taking over where the other left off. Initially, Zandra Rhodes designed a series of fabrics. Maxine Smith then had them printed to her own colour pattern by Alex McIntyre, often using the same colourway and design on different fabrics so that texture changes have been subtly worked from cotton to felt to satin. Some sur-faces are flat, others gathered – as in the hall where felt blends with draped cotton. Throughout there is an instantaneous impact of colour, wit and comfort. As one becomes accustomed to the colours, one realises that the sitting-room is designed for midnight rather than midday, the windows permanently shuttered and the curtains drawn. One notices the enormous portrait of Lenny Bruce by Gary Smith, ‘twenties’ armchairs with covered feet found by Maxine Smith in Antique City, the Vogue needlepoint cushions all worked by her mother. In the bedroom, apricot satin and taffetas with a felt print ceiling and apricot-coloured cupboards, the bed set on a mirrored podium, and covered with cushions. Other points of colour are the red telephone, the amber carpet. Next, a completely cupboarded dressing-room. Then, the apricot bathroom. Downstairs, past a neon sign—”I love Max”—and other such illuminations, to the dining-room: originally a cellar, now a brilliant blue small tent. The kitchen has dark rust-coloured prints, the ceiling hung with a thousand cooking utensils and an enormous electric lamp bulb found at Selfridges. Just off the kitchen a bar, a platform bat on steps, with three-tier cushions as bar stools, and an embroidery of Whistler’s mother by Malcolm Poynter, which came from the DM Gallery, Fulham Road. London’s galleries and off-beat furniture shops have produced many other pieces of art and amusement, some of them transformed by Zandra Rhodes’ coverings, others untouched, all with a special blend of humour and art.

Photographed by Henry Clarke.

Scanned from Vogue, late April 1975.

The downstairs bar with Malcolm Poynter’s embroidery of Whistler’s mother in the background, cushions instead of bar stools.
Two views of the sitting-room, Maxine Smith wearing a Zandra Rhodes’ dress of the same print as the walls—”The dress came first, the walls followed.” All fabrics by Zandra Rhodes, from the range at Christopher Vane Percy, 5 Weighhouse St, W.1
The garden room leading off the bar.
The hall draped with cotton print.
The blue tent dining-room with candlesticks by Carole McNicholl

Cacharel at Harrods

1970s, cacharel, Harrods, Inspirational Images, Sarah Moon, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Photographed by Sarah Moon.

Scanned from Vogue, Late April 1974.