Christmas Decoration

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara daly, David Anthony, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Vivienne Lynn

Fantasy and theatre is the theme – lots of colour and glitter the focal points … Fantasy can run the whole gamut, but we like the feel of a ‘Thirties-type Hollywood pin-up pic, the soulful tragi-comic look of a clown or even a glamorous ‘Twenties flapper girl. Take your pick, and choose your own Christmas decorations.

An idea we captured from the realms of Erte, the artist and designer of the ‘Twenties – true theatrical fantasy, ideal for all your Christmas parties, a look which you can create yourself following our instructions.

Hair and the silver sequined skull cap with front forehead curl, was dressed by John at Leonard. To do this style yourself, use sequin strips (available on a card) and wrap them first round the head in a skull cap shape, making sure they sit flat, close an neatly. Leave a small strand of hair free and set it into a little curl. Then, take single hair strands, as we have done, and intertwine them with a sequin strip, like a plait.

Model is Vivienne Lynn.

Make-up by Barbara Daly.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1971.

You know how good it feels (Part 2)

19 magazine, 1970s, Austin Garritt, biba, David Anthony, Deco Inspired, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Jane Goddard, janet reger, Simpson of Piccadilly

As promised, the follow up to yesterday’s post featuring a stunning image of all the prizes which were available in this competition. A satin Biba lounging outfit, Janet Reger underwear and a dozen bottles of Laurent Perrier champagne is probably still my idea of covetable luxury!

Modelled by Jane Goddard.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1974.

Fancy That!

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, boy london, Daily Blue, David Anthony, Inspirational Images, Retro, Rossella Goldschmied, Scruffs, strawberry studio, Vintage Editorials
Pink and white spotted elasticated top, £2.45 by Scruffs. Pink tiered skirt, £11.50, by Foxy. Glasses from a selection at Retro, from £3. Jewellery from Adrien Mann.

Take some bright reds, greens, yellows, pinks and blues – and blend them with spots and stripes, ribbons and frills. Add bangles, bead ribbons and flowers and finish off with sexy, high heeled shoes. You’ll be the star attraction… We chose some Italian designs from our favourite Italian company, Daily Blue. These are pricey but highly original, so that even if you can’t afford them you can profit from the idea.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, June 1977.

Dress by Rossella Goldschmied for Daily Blue, £70.
Off the shoulder top, £38, and matching skirt, £60, both by Rossella Goldschmied for Daily Blue.
Pink top, £50, tiered apron skirt, £47, and matching shorts £17.50, all by Rossella Goldschmied for Daily Blue.
Cheesecloth dress by Taramina.
Red and white spotted top, £10.99, and matching skirt, £9.99, by Strawberry Studio. Glasses, £2, from Boy / Spotted top by Scruffs, £4.75. Cheesecloth skirt by Strawberry Studio, £7.99. Glasses from Boy.

Get Dressed

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, Charles Batten, Cloud Nine, David Anthony, Inspirational Images, manolo blahnik, Mary Graeme, nostalgia, Retro, Sacha, Samuel Sherman, Spectrum, stirling cooper, strawberry studio, Sunarama, Vintage Editorials, way in, zapata
Scarf around head from Nostalgia. Sun dress by Stirling Cooper. Blue glass necklace from Cloud Nine. Second hand floral sun dress from Retro. Rayon knit shawl from Jump. White leather shoes by Sacha. Pearl necklaces worn around the wrist from Adrien Mann. Flower and veiling from department stores.

Summer sundresses can go a long way. They’re so versatile – you can wear them for work and then dress them up for the evening with hats, scarves and jewellery. Here are some of our ideas.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1975.

Straw hats from Marida. Second hand crepe de Chine dresses from Retro. Belt from Way In. Socks by Sunarama. Shoes by Zapata (left) and Sacha (right).
Black crepe de chine daffodil print dress by Strawberry Studio. Shawl from Cloud Nine. Tan sandals by Mary Graeme. Pink straw hat by Charles Batten. Black crepe de Chine smock by Spectrum. Green canvas shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Bangles by Adrien Mann.
White cotton pull on hat by Edward Mann. Pale green and white straight dress by Concept at Samuel Sherman. Blue straw hat by Charles Batten. Pale blue and white dress by Concept at Samuel Sherman.

Flora Exotica

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, David Anthony, Ferrer Y Sentis, Inspirational Images, Ivory, jap, Joseph, kenzo, Lo Roco, Mrs Howie, Sacha, stirling cooper, Taramina, Vintage Editorials
Floral print dress with lace-up front by Stirling Cooper. Pink shoes by Ivory.

Floral prints are bursting out all over. Add these to crepe de chines, cotton and cotton jerseys and, suddenly, you have the most colourful summer of all.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, June 1977.

Floral print dress with lace up sides by Lo Roco. Gold shoes by Sacha.
Palm print one shoulder t-shirt dress by Ferrer Y Sentis from Joseph.
Shocking pink and yellow bikini by Mrs Howie. Floral skirt by Taramina. Blue shoes by Ivory.
Floral printed lace up dress by Lo Roco. Bangles by Adrien Mann.
Yellow broderie anglaise t-shirt and bright pink floral skirt. Both by Jap at Joseph. Pink shoes by Ivory.

For Dinner Dates

19 magazine, 1970s, David Anthony, dorothee bis, Essences, Fiorucci, gordon king, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, Midas, Russell & Bromley, Sacha, Scruffs, strawberry studio, Vintage Editorials, wallis
Green sweater and purple sweater around waist both by Fiorucci. Purple tights from The Dance Centre. Red leather ankle boots by Russell & Bromley. Lilac gloves by Cornelia James. Belt by Pixie. Purse by Midas. / Hat with net and blue lurex sweater by Dorothee Bis. Tights by Mary Quant. Perspex shoes by Russell & Bromley.Belt by Trimfit. Scarves from Woolworths.

Whether it’s dinner for two, or a special night out with a crowd, you want to be sure that you’ve got that certain ‘little number’ to fit the bill. To be sure that you’re not caught on the hop, we’ve picked a selection of really feminine dresses, satin trousers, skirts, tops and even an elegantly tailored, satin suit fit for the Ritz. Happy wining and dining!

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1976.

Taffeta dress by Strawberry Studio. Shoes by Sacha. Scarf from Essences. / Black and pink satin suit by Gordon King. Satin shohes and bag by Midas.
Black top by Scruffs. Cream skirt by Jeff Banks. Boots from Midas. / Cream silk shirt by Jeff Banks. Black satin drainpipes by Scruffs. Boots and bag from Midas.
Red and black crepe dress by Gordon King. Red pants by Highlight. Red ankle boots by Russell & Bromley. Sash by Strawberry Studio / Black embossed satin tunic by Wallis. Blue pants by Highlight. Black suede boots by Midas. Sash from Strawberry Studio.

Act Naturally

19 magazine, 1970s, Bata, biba, charlotte martin, David Anthony, david silverman, jenny hare, Madrugada, Spectrum

Act Naturally 1

Yellow cheesecloth blouse and matching shirt by Richard Green.

For those lazy, hazy days of summer, nothing is better to hang out in than loose, casual, breezy blouses and skirts. There are masses around to choose from and it seems that the smock top has really gathered strength this summer. Why not? It’s the best kind of top to feel really relaxed and liberated in. Wear it over old jeans, if you’re really the casual type, or over skirts down to ground level. One of the best and most comfortable buys to go with the look is soft cotton espadrilles, with rope soles, like the ones from Bata.

Photographed by David Anthony. Model: Charlotte Martin.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, July 1972.

Act Naturally 2

Green and white gingham blouse and matching long skirt and pinny, all by Spectrum.

Act Naturally 3

Gingham smock and matching skirt (not shown) by David Silverman. Jeans model’s own.

Act Naturally 4

T-shirt from selection at Biba. Smock top in crepe de chine and matching long skirt both by Madrugada. Red tights by Biba. Yellow espadrilles by Bata.

Act Naturally 5

White smock in fine wool by Jenny Hare.

The Varnished and the Unvarnished

1970s, David Anthony, elizabeth arden, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Make-up

the-varnished-and-the-unvarnished

This picture isn’t a ludicrous flight of fancy. Those nails belong to Bonnie, a girl who really does scrabble about under the bonnet of her car checking oil, batteries and spark plug. She also shoes the odd bit of typing and her fair share of washing up, plug changing and picture hanging.

But maybe we have been a little unfair. Bonnie is not only one of our favourite make-up artists (working for Elizabeth Arden) but she’s a fully trained manicurist too.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, May 1973.

Inspirational Images: The Secret of Being an Inscrutable Beauty

1970s, cosmopolitan, David Anthony, Inspirational Images, Julie Ege, pierre laroche, thea porter

Julie Ege in Thea Porter

Inscrutable means being “wholly mysterious” and after a summer of freckles and jeans maybe the time is ripe for the return of the cool, self-regarding beauty. Julie Ege, Queen of a thousand popping flash bulbs, without whom no première is complete, veils her flashing smile to emerge as the epitome of the new inscrutable woman, in our picture.

Dress by Thea Porter. Necklaces from the Purple Shop. Bracelets and rings from Jones, Beauchamp Place. Fur rug from Harrods. Make up by Pierre LaRoche for Estée Lauder. Hair by Oliver at Leonard.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, September 1973.

Apologies for the protracted absence! I am most definitely back, working on new blogs for both here and Shrimpton Couture Curate, and of course I’m still sourcing the best boutique vintage for you over at Vintage-a-Peel! xx

Inspirational Images: Eyebrows – Going, going, gone

David Anthony, Hair and make-up, harpers and queen, Joan Price, Make-up, Ricci Burns

eyebrows harpers and queen december 1970 david anthony

The no-eyebrow look for the Seventies. You can achieve it, as we did here, by the use of a hair removing cream — I advise against plucking or waxing as this can permanently inhibit regrowth. Or, if you don’t want to be so drastic, you can have your brows bleached so that they are almost invisible. For the pale complexion : English Porcelain Re-Nutriv foundation with Sheer Bisque Re-Nutriv face powder; Neutraled Flesh Under Eye Primer stick ; Aurora Pink and Mint Haze Colour Contour for shaping and shading. For the eyes we used Plum Raisin and Candlelight Pink Pressed Eyelid shadows, and Black Burgundy Lash Lengthening Roll-On mascara. The lipstick is Mulberry See-Through. All by Estee Lauder. Hair style : a Marcel wave brought up to date, by Ricci Burns.

My prediction for 1971 is a swing away from the natural look and the form I believe it will take is the disappearance of eyebrows and the return to a pale, pink and white complexion. As with so many new looks in the past few years, this one has been started by models. I saw two of them, browless, this autumn in St Tropez and it gave a new and exciting perspective to the face. Beauty, like fashion, goes in cycles : after a decade of the natural look, we are due for a return to a more stylised face. The last time this occurred was in the Twenties when women achieved a very stylised type of look with pale faces, dark lips, and eyebrows plucked into pin-thin crescents. It reached its peak in the faces of Garbo, Jean Harlow and Marlene Dietrich. If, this time, it is the no-eyebrow look that catches on, it will not be the first time that brows have been removed in the cause of beauty : fashionable ladies in the 15th century covered their faces with white flour powder and accentuated the egg shape pallor of their complexions by plucking the eyebrows out completely and scraping back their hair under exaggerated head-dresses.

Beauty by Joan Price. Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, December 1970