Why your clothes cost so much

1970s, airbrushing, biba, cosmopolitan, Illustrations, philip castle
“We all know prices are spiralling. You don’t need to study statistics to realise that your winter coat has cost you more, that sweaters, skirts, shoes and bags are now major investments. But why? And why so suddenly? “I remember when you could buy…” is no longer the prerogative of the middle aged reminiscing on lost youth. I remember when you could still buy a dress in Biba for just over £2, and, what’s more, I still wear it.”

A typically brilliant Philip Castle illustration to accompany an article by Shirley Flack on inflation and the effect on clothes prices at the time. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Although I would kill for the quality you were getting for your inflated prices in 1974. And, naturally, I always recommend shopping second hand anyway!

Illustration by Philip Castle.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, January 1974.

Cornucopia

1970s, Adrian Mann, Badges and Equipment, corocraft, crowthers, flair magazine, Illustrations, philip castle, universal witness
I. Red and white enamel and gilt bumble-bee with pearly eyes/78p. 2. Blue, green and red enamel and gilt dragon-fly/78p. 3. Green and red enamel and gilt dragon-fly/90p, all by Adrien Mann. 4. Red plastic may-bug, Universal Witness/75p. 5. Small green and blue enamel and gilt dragon-fly, Adrien Mann, 57p. 6. Antique nickel plated bumble-bee, Gay Designs/69p. 7. Red plastic bunch of cherries, Adrien Mann/95p. 8. Chrome acorn and oak-leaves badge, Badges and Equipment/45p. 9. Creamy plastic peacock, Universal Witness/75p. 10. Shiny red enamel continental tomato, Corocraft/69p. 11. Small house badge, Crowthers/ 33p. 12. Double daisy with green enamel petals and red enamel centres, Adrien Mann £1.08. 13. Spotty apple badge, Crowthers/ 37p. 44. Green enamel apple/69p. 15. Yellow enamel pear/69p, both by Corocraft.

Pin on a badge like one of these and you’re back to nature in a small way. Picture badges, winged thing pins, discs in the shape of fruit, flowers and plants-all are part of the new, slightly naive look in accessories. And whereabouts on your person, you might ask, do you actually pin a bumble-bee or a pear? Answer is anywhere. On your left sleeve. Let a dragon-fly come to rest at your hemline. Let an oakleaf sprout on a kneesock. Just let the badge be where it falls naturally.

Illustration by Philip Castle.

Scanned from Flair, August 1971.

The prettiest summertime since the Impressionists

1970s, fortnum and mason, Illustrations, Tiktiner, Vogue, Zelda G
The prettiest summertime since the Impressionists… la belle epoch recalled with visions of long skirts sweeping the grass and delicate lace in dappled orchards. Tiktiner’s summertime separates are purely pretty in crisp, cool grey cotton inset with guipure lace. Circular wrap long skirt and blouse £69. From the choice collection of summer fashions at Fortnum & Mason, 181 Piccadilly, London.

Illustrated by Zelda G

Scanned from Vogue, May 1974.

Now it can be revealed

1970s, Antiquarius, Chelsea Antiques Market, Emmerton and Lambert, forbidden fruit, Inspirational Images, michael roberts, ritva, sunday times magazine, The Purple Shop, Uschi Obermaier, Vintage Editorials, Willie Christie
White kebaya with violet lace trim, £15, from a selection between £12-50 and £30 at Forbidden Fruit, 325 Kings Road. Broderie anglaise skirt, £8, from Vern Lambert, Chelsea Market.

A kebaya is the traditional organdie blouse which Malay and Indonesian women wear over their sarong. It is lavishly embroidered and trimmed with lace. No two are alike. Now available here, selling from £12.50 for plainer ones to £30 for the most elaborate, they provide summer’s latest exotic look. Worn with old jeans or peasanty skirts, pinned together with antique clasps, the kebaya is the sexiest thing in town.

Model is Uschi Obermaier.

Report by Michael Roberts.

Photographed by Willie Christie.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, July 7th 1974.

Blue/pink embroidered kebaya, £18, from a selection priced between £18 and £30 at Ritva, 8 Hollywood Road, London S. W.10. Art Nouveau jewellery from The Purple Shop, Antiquarius, Kings Road, London S. W.3.
Floral-embroidered kebayas, £20, from a selection between £18 and £30 at Ritva. Deco clasps, £1 ; broderie anglaise skirt, £8, all from Vern Lambert. Pendants and butterfly brooch from The Purple Shop.
Floral-embroidered kebaya, £20, from a selection between £18 and £30 at Ritva. Deco clasps, £1 ; broderie anglaise skirt, £8, all from Vern Lambert. Pendants and butterfly brooch from The Purple Shop.

Quand on porte la mode, mieux vaut savoir avec quoi elle est faite

1970s, Illustrations, Mademoiselle Age Tendre, Vintage Adverts

“When you wear fashion, it’s better to know what it’s made with.”

Illustrator unknown (but I love the very visible pen marks, it’s just glorious).

Scanned from Mademoiselle Âge Tendre, June 1972.

Cover Up

1970s, Antiquarius, Buckle Under, caroline smith, Christopher Morris, Du-Du, Equinox, Escalade, Foale and Tuffin, forbidden fruit, harpers and queen, Illustrations, Le Bistingo Boutique

A holiday necessity—to entice your gigolo, or simply preserve decency on the terrace for lunchtime drinks — is a cover-up. We’ve looked around, found the nicest ones in town and had them sketched here by Caroline Smith. Some you tie Polynesian style (remember Blue Lagoon?) round you; others you lie on, or in; others are like the simplest dress slipped over your head to demurely cover you up (don’t shock the curé) for church-seeing.

1 Du-Du at 95 Parkway, NW1 are in for a sell-out this summer with their ‘Kangas’. Kangas, for the uninformed, are long pieces of cotton in a huge variety of colours and patterns. They come from Africa and act like a sarong ; they cost about £3 and pack to the site of a handkerchief. 2 Foale & Tuffin‘s new swimsuit will take you right back to Nanny and the sand-pit. White and orange spotted seersucker with a shirred bodice and bloomers ; £7.50, from Countdown, 137 Kings Rd, SW3; Lucienne Phillips, 09 Knightsbridge, SW1. Proving that the cottage industry is thriving, Christopher Morris and his wife Lera, with a friend, Hazel McKenzie, recently opened Habari at 39 Sussex Place, W2. Christopher designs all the clothes, while Lera and Hazel dye the fabric and screen-print it into luscious patterns. They also sell things like the small basket shown below. It’s in brown and cream string and really pretty; £4.25. The dress has a hessian bodice and a low back (or front —depending on how you wear it) with a short voile skirt: £18-50. Peeping out from under the dress on the extreme right of this page you can see their leather sandal, shaped like a trapezium ; £4. 4 Le Bistingo Boutique at 93 Kings Rd, SW3, have gone to town on the Piz Buin collection of swimwear. Its made of polyester fabric —see-through and also tan-through. The designs are rather Tahitian with bright colours and bold flower prints. There are sarong skirts to match the bikinis and make you more respectable. If these still aren’t enough, the bikinis do also come in a less revealing material. The bikini is £7.80, the skirt £10.90. Le Bistingo have also latched on to another idea … if you find that by some strange quirk of fate you need a different sized bikini top and bottom, ‘Huit’ ) now make them separately up to 38″ bust ; £5.50 the set at Le Bistino. 5 Equinox in Antiquarius (135 Kings Rd, SW3) is owned by David Scott and James Goldsack who have got together a fantastic conglomeration of stock from all over the world. It’s a haven for all Indian enthusiasts, as there’s a jolly collection of Navajo Indian carpets and jewellery. You can also buy Spanish crockery which is very, very ‘earthy’ looking, or if you prefer to sit on a prayer mat and sip your tea out of a little Chinese bowl, then Equinox can cater for both these needs as well. So as not to stray too far away from the point of this month’s Shopping B, they also do a very nice line in beach cover-ups ; this one is Mexican and hand-embroidered on cotton, £20. 6 Guaranteed to keep off sunstroke : pretty red straw hat with tanan ribbon ; by Buckle Under about f6.50; from Harrods, Knightsbridge and Darlings, Bath. 7 Essential beach bag to hoard biros and postcards — in canvas, comes in various colours (this one is green). £4.95, Escalade, 187 Brompton Rd, SW3. 8 If you like long skirts and dresses beautifully embroidered, and soft cheesecloth skirts with appliqués, then the place to go is Forbidden Fruit at 352 Kings Rd, SW3. We chose a long cheesecloth skirt with dark brown embroidery around the hem and a matching shirt with shirring round the waist and neckline. Very soft and feminine; sold together, £15.

Illustrated by Caroline Smith.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, July 1972.

You know how good it feels (Part 1)

19 magazine, 1970s, art deco, Deco Inspired, Illustrations, Lyn Gray

Magic moments, happy moments, moments alone and moments together—you know how good all that feels. And nothing feels better than that touch of luxury when it comes your way unexpectedly. Just in case you don’t know, we want to prove it, by putting that touch of luxury within your reach. For us, the ‘Thirties, perhaps more than any other era, set the mood for elegance and glamour, and we’ve chosen all our prizes in styles and shades to capture that mood.

A series of eight blissfully brilliant illustrations accompanying a competition feature. There is also a stunning photograph which I will post tomorrow as I thought these deserved their own post.

Illustrations by Lyn Gray.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1974.

Livia

1970s, Angela Landels, harpers and queen, Illustrations, Vicky Tiel, Vintage Adverts
“Clothes to be loved in.”

Dress by Vicky Tiel.

Illustrator uncredited. (Possibly Angela Landels).

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, May 1975.

District Line

1970s, Holly, Honey Magazine, Illustrations

Illustration for a short story by Diana Winsor called District Line.

Illustrated by Holly.

Scanned from Honey, July 1974.

Floppy berets and over the knee socks

1970s, Bellini, caroline smith, harpers and queen, Illustrations, Inspirational Images

If you can’t buy it anywhere else, you’ll probably stumble on it in a craft shop — from the most punctiliously-made tapestry, reeking with tradition and the skills of centuries, to crazy little things like corn-dollies and earth mothers. The name Women’s Home Industries’ conjures up all the right kind of pre-Women’s Lib craftsmanship. The work still goes on, and every type of hand-knitted clothing is still sold from their re-christened shop, Beatrice Bellini Handknits, 11 West Halkin St, SW1.

Their bright, stripy, over-the-knee socks in various colours, or to order; £5.50. The lovely floppy beret comes in matching colours, and costs £3.50. The WHI Tapestry Shop, 85 Pimlico Road, SW1 sells hand-painted canvases for anything from a specs case to a large rug, and will copy your sketches on to canvas.

Illustrations by Caroline Smith.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, April 1972.