What See-throughs did for breasts, Gala Lip Pen does for mouths.

1970s, cosmopolitan, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, December 1972

Enter Chloé

1980s, Chloe, harpers and queen, karl lagerfeld, Vintage Adverts
Exclusive Chloé Designs by Karl Lagerfeld – Chloé Boutique, 173 New Bond Street, London W.1.

“A woman does not put on my fragrance. She enters it.” Karl Lagerfeld.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, October 1982.

Don’t cry your eyes out

19 magazine, 1970s, Hair and make-up, Make-up, mary quant, Vintage Adverts
“Don’t cry your eyes out”, says Mary Quant. “I’ve just added some new colours to my Tearproof Mascara range. You can now get chocolate, grey, bottle-green as well as black, brown-black and blue.”

Scanned from 19 Magazine, September 1975.

We play a lot more now we’ve discovered Smirnoff

19 magazine, 1970s, Inspirational Images, smirnoff, Vintage Adverts

Another in the stylish but bizarre series of Smirnoff adverts.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, September 1974.

On the rocks

1980s, harpers and queen, helmut newton, Inspirational Images, Vintage Adverts, yves saint laurent

Saint Laurent Rive Gauche advert photographed by Helmut Newton.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, March 1983.

Gold shoes for day, that’s for the birds.

1970s, chelsea cobbler, shoes, tessa traeger, Vintage Adverts, Vogue
High-heeled shoe on the thinnest of platforms; the heel, the toe and the lacing in shiny gold kid, the rest of the shoe in white kid. A natural progression from the glittery day clothes of winter. Some shoes are all gold, others combine gold with a multitude of contrasting colours. This shoe by Richard Smith for The Chelsea Cobbler. A golden shot in the arm for shoes.

Photographed by Tessa Traeger.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1973.

Shock proof knitwear?

19 magazine, 1970s, Inspirational Images, John Craig, knitwear, marshall lester, Vintage Adverts
Our Tricel disco test: Dressed in Tricel, a couple spent an energetic evening at a discotheque. Come going home time they both felt cool and comfortable despite the crowd. Marshall Lester tops to top the pops in. In a variety of super colours.

Some synthetic fibres become highly charged with static electricity. In a crowd you’ll find they stick to your body something shocking. Not so with man-made Tricel. It’s less static than most synthetics. It absorbs moisture. And because it breathes, it’s much more comfortable. Stick to Tricel. It won’t stick to you.

There’s little I love more than novelty acrylic knitwear, but novelty acrylic knitwear in a groovy scenario such as these, well I just feel spoilt quite frankly.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, 1972.

Knitwear by Peter London
Knitwear by John Craig

The Seven Faces of Beauty

1970s, barry lategan, beauty, Gina Fratini, Hair and make-up, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, Make-up, Sujon, Vintage Adverts, Vivienne Lynn, Vogue
Monday’s Child is Fair of Face. Blue flowers from Novelty Imports. Blue silk blouse by Sujon.

A stunningly styled and photographed advertisement feature for Boots No7 cosmetics, based around the ‘Monday’s Child’ nursery rhyme (although they’ve muddled up Friday and Saturday as far as I remember it). As a Tuesday’s child, I’m pretty happy with my lot although never sure how graceful I am. Which one are you? I particularly love Vivienne Lynn’s mournful Wednesday’s Child.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1972.

Tuesday’s Child is Full of Grace. Pink voile blouse by Plainclothes. Hat by Herbert Johnson.
Wednesday’s Child is Full of Woe.
Thursday’s Child has Far to Go
Friday’s Child works hard for her living.
Saturday’s Child is Loving and Giving.
And the child that is born on the Sabbath Day is Bonny and Blithe, Good and Gay. White smock top by Gina Fratini.

Easy on the eye

19 magazine, 1970s, Hair and make-up, Illustrations, Miners, philip castle, Vintage Adverts
Miners make the most of your eyes

(Uncredited artist but it looks like it could well be the work of Philip Castle)

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1979.

The Land of the Pinta

19 magazine, 1970s, Vintage Adverts

C’mon, surely I can have a time-travelling postbox for my birthday?

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1979.