A breath of green

1970s, beauty, belinda bellville, charles jourdan, david bailey, Garrard, Inspirational Images, maudie james, Vogue
The greenest scent of summer—Estee Lauder’s Alliage with hints of marigold, jasmine and muguet, to wear with green chiffon, and Estee Lauder’s new Copper and Bronze Make-up.

Model is Maudie James.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1973.

Daisy lawn chiffon caped over bandeau bra with shoulder straps, blowing into a herbaceous hem. By Bellville Sassoon. Daisy brooch of diamonds and peridot on one ear, £4,400, at Collingwood. Snake bracelets, diamonds and garnet, £3,205, diamonds and emerald, £850, at Garrard. Emerald and gold ring by Arthur King, £1,360, at Blooms. Carved emerald ring surrounded by two rows of diamonds, £1,250 at Michael Fishberg. Round pin in the hair, left, diamonds and sapphires, emeralds and rubies, £950, Cameo Corner. Pale yellow tights, Mary Quant, 40p, Selfridges. Dior sandals, £24, Charles Jourdan

Boots care for hair. Colourfully.

19 magazine, 1970s, Boots, Inspirational Images, platforms, Vintage Adverts
The Boots Electrical Beauty range is just about the prettiest you’ll find anywhere. Hairdryers, heated hair rollers and lady shavers in spring-time colours like Lilac, Soft Lavender, Peach, Cream and lots more. Another thing you’ll find is that all these lovely things cost a lot less than other popular makes. But that’s what you expect from Boots products isn’t it? The Boots Beauty Care range. The prettiest things , to make you look your prettiest.

I’m not sure it gets much more 1973 than the styling here. Almost worthy of a Roxy Music cover. In fact, it wouldn’t surprise me if it was consciously or subconsciously influenced by that.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1973.

Beauty from Biba

19 magazine, 1970s, barbara hulanicki, Barbara Hulanicki, beauty, biba, british boutique movement, hair, Hair and make-up, Make-up

As with everything Biba creates, its newly opened Beauty Parlour in the Kensington store hits that striking note of sparkling originality.

It has 19’s stamp of approval. because it is a genuine beauty parlour, in the true, old-fashioned sense of the word. The Parlour welcomes you into a relaxed, spacious and luxurious, ‘Thirties’ world of cream and black decor, bedecked with dark green palms. It is the brain-child of Barbara Hulaniki— Biba’s creator—and Regis, a brilliant and inventive make-up artist and hairdresser.

Before Regis showed us around, we asked him to tell us about his past.

Looking every bit as dashing as Valentino himself. he said: “Call me a man with no past. Although I trained and worked in many leading salons, I don’t want to be attached to anything I’ve done before or The Parlour to be compared with others.”

The Parlour offers the services of a modern establishment (from haircutting to leg waxing) which it executes in a novel way. Here you are not a number with a gown—you are treated as an individual with individual needs. In true Biba tradition, on arrival, you are fitted out with a fabulous gown—either a long black satin one (if you are having your hair done), a black velour robe (for the guys) or a super black towelling robe (if you are going into the beauty room). Even the hair nets are pretty— black and silky.


The seating is so cleverly designed in the curved and pillared room that one client hardly sees another and, although each hairdresser—and there are three, plus Regis— has his own ‘corner’, all the involved treatments, such as tinting, bleaching, high-lighting and perming. are done in private cubicles.

Biba carries every conceivable shade of hair colouring and hasn’t just confined The Parlour to all the well-known branded names. Regis virtually combed the earth to find special formulas and effects.

Henna treatments are very popular and Biba uses several varieties—Black Henna, for dark heads; Neutral Henna, for blondes; Henna Wax for dry, split hair; ordinary henna, for a rich, red glow and a special henna, which can be used with a perm—normally you cannot perm hair which has henna on it. (Henna treatment costs from £6: tinting from £6.50; perming from £10.) Regis has fixed ideas concerning shampoo.

“A good shampoo is the most important step in the whole process. because if you use a bad one. then you can forget about doing an original style. Dull, horrible hair can never look good, however hard you try.”

Biba has 17 kinds of shampoo to choose from, ranging from ‘Almond’ and ‘Strawberry’ to ‘Henna Gloss’ shampoo, which doesn’t actually colour the hair but, with constant use, produces marvellous red lights. There are also three biological shampoos: one for greasy hair, one for dry and one for dandruff sufferers. (A shampoo and set costs £3, no matter which shampoo you need to use.)

Other Biba specialities are the after-washing, pre-setting goodies. Regis’ favourite is the Champagne Rinse, which gives a remarkable gloss and softness. The Henna Conditioner is good and there are Frictions, too, which are spirit-based hair perfumes, to make your hair smell beautiful, as well as look good. (Frictions are something mothers and grandmothers know all about. but which had disappeared from our lives—until now.) These cost 50p. each, and you can choose from ‘Orchid’, `Fougere., ‘Eau de Cologne’, ‘Passionate’ and ‘Gardenia’.


Blow-drying is virtually non-existent at Biba.

“We want girls to look truly groomed and feminine again.” said Regis. He believes in the old-style training and he and his staff use rollers (but not heated ones), Marcel Wave tongs, wave clips. small tongs and irons, and do lots of exacting pin-curling.


The Beauty Room is run by a very efficient lady and practically anything is done. There are treatments to help acne problems; waxing to remove unwanted hair; massage including a deep-back massage. with an infra-red lamp; spot reducing with Slendertone and eye treatments, which include eyebrow shaping, eyelash dyeing and the application of Permanent lashes. (This costs £4. and replacements later on cost 10p. a lash.)

The manicures and pedicures are superb. If it is just a plain one you want, then, of course, they will oblige. But if you want something for a special occasion then they can do fantastic combinations of colours, patterns and designs on nails and toes, too, if required. (Ordinary manicures cost £1: the special kind. £2.50.)

As far as make-up is concerned. Regis will create a fantastic new look for you and will advise on form-ulas, colours and applica-tion. (Cost £5.)

The Parlour opens at 11am., on weekdays, and last appointments are at 6.30pm. On Saturdays. opening time is 9.30am. and last appointments are at 4pm.

It’s sobering to remember that about seven months after this article appeared, Biba was closed forever.

Photographer(s) uncredited.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, February 1975.

For the Discotheque

1960s, beauty, hair, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, paul misso, petticoat magazine, Piero de Monzi

When you go to a nightclub – don’t look nice! Nice means safe make-up, a little eyeshadow and ordinary hair. That’s the best way to get lost when you should be turning every head.

Go wild, wear crazy colours – cause a sensation whatever you do, don’t play safe. Looking so sensational, you’re going to be dancing a lot, so be sure of your cool. Have a crazy bath with the water coloured blue with Weil’s Antilope Bain de Mousse, £1.10s. Deodorise from top to toe with Arrid’s anti perspirant for underarms, 4s.6d. which you wisely defuzzed the night before, and use Bidex vaginal deodorant spray, 8s.11d. Give feet a treat with Windsor Gold Foot Freshener, 18s.6d.

Then wear lashings of cologne and matching talc touch of the exotics with Kiku’s Talc Ball £1.7s. 6d. and After Bath Cologne, £2.9s.6d. by Faberge.

Jayne’s wig comes from Leonards and it really stopped the traffic. Her foundation is Rubinstein’s Illumination Souffle Stick £2.7s.6d., then a polished glow with a few deft slicks of Vanilla Souffle stick £2.7s.6d. On her eyes—Lumina Silver Cake Eyeshadow, 35s. by Rubinstein, Gala’s Iced Mauve Matte Shadow 7s.9d., in the socket line. Pale mauve real feather lashes by Piero de Monzi, £3.13s.6d., top lashes 18s.6d., by Cardinelli. Mauve eyeshadow painted on lips or Cydax Apricot Gold Colour Creme Lipstick, 14s.6d. Kiku perfume stick, £2.17s.6d. for bosom, behind ears, wrists and back of knees. Give nails crystal lights with one of Cutex’s new exciting colours like Zircon Glaze, 5s.3d. Soften hands with Rubinstein’s Hand Delight. 16s.

Clothes from Fenwick. Golden Disc and Sidney Smith.

Beauty by Ann Morrow.

Photographed by Paul Misso.

Scanned from Petticoat, 8th November 1969.

Judy Bowker in Annacat

1970s, annacat, Annette Green, beauty, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Judy Bowker, Make-up, Vogue
Judy Bowker: 17-year-old actress soon to be seen as Saint Clare in “Brother Sun, Sister Moon”, chosen by director Franco Zeffirelli for her young, calm and serene beauty. Here she wears Innoxa’s Satin Sheen Peach moisturised foundation with a touch of Terra Glaze Colour Sheen on her cheeks, her eyes shine with Doeskin Shadow Gleam, the lashes with Dark Brown Master Stroke Mascara, and on her lips the new Jewelfast lipstick Flapper. Dress from Annacat. Hair by Manfred of Vidal Sassoon.

Photographed by Annette Green.

Scanned from Vogue, September 15th 1971.

Face Value

1970s, Adrian Mann, beauty, eric boman, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, Richard Sharah, Sun and Sand, Vogue
T-shirt by Sun and Sand. Cotton square, flower bunch by Novelty Import Co. at John Lewis.

This is what eyebrows used to look like, kids!

Hair by John at Leonard. Make-up by Richard Sharah.

Photographed by Eric Boman.

Scanned from Vogue, April 15th 1975.

T-shirt by Sun and Sand. Pink spotted ribbon, blue wrist-tied cotton square from John Lewis. Buttercup yellow bangle from Adrien Mann.

Make your face look as pretty as the picture

19 magazine, 1970s, beauty, Hair and make-up, Make-up, Vintage Adverts

Scanned from 19 Magazine, May 1975.

Put your looks on your lucky number

1970s, barry lategan, beauty, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, Malcolm Raines, Vogue
…with Boots completely revised Number 7 range – pure good colours, everything you need, and all in handsome heavy white and tan jars, cases and bottles – over 200 products in all.

While the hat is – unusually for Vogue – uncredited, the image is taken from this otherwise black and white editorial from the previous month so is probably by Malcolm Raines.

Hair by Oliver at Leonard.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, April 1971

Eye Catching

1970s, beauty, david bailey, Demas, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, jean muir, Make-up, Vogue

Helga, half-Austrian, half Irish/American and twenty-one this month, with new eye-catching make-up: Leichner’s theatrical grease stick in Chrome with Carmine 1 over it above the eye hollow. Foundation: Blend of Pearl with Pink on Pink Glowtone over cheeks, Alletta lipstick, all Kamera Klear. Jean Muir’s silk crepe jersey dress, pink coral flower brooch with earrings to match by Demas.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Vogue, March 1st 1970.

How we gave Linda a new lovely look

1970s, beauty, beauty tips, Chris Holland, Estee Lauder, Hair and make-up, Linda Hayden, Make-up, Max Factor, petticoat magazine, way in

This is Linda Hayden, seventeen year old actress and friend of Richard Harris. Of her he’s said, “She looks absolutely lovely, she’s a wonderful girl.” Linda doesn’t altogether agree with him. She doesn’t think she looks absolutely lovely because she says her cheeks are too podgy. She is very partial to lager and lime, Cornish cream, butter and crusty fresh bread : But when she is working on a film like Baby Love or her latest, Satan’s Skin, her weight just falls off. Still, normally it’s a great battle to keep to her ideal seven and a half stone. When we met Linda, she told us that she had two ambitions: 1. To stop being cast as a nymphet in horror films. 2. To learn how to shade her face so it always looked slim. Linda has very little time to learn about makeup. When she was fifteen she starred in Baby Love, but was not allowed to go and see it. After that she had a series of sexy parts in Hammer films like Taste the Blood of Dracula. In her latest film with Charles Hanson and Piers Haggard there are all sorts of evil doings, Linda told us, “Hardly a moment went by without someone being impaled on a pitchfork, raped, or stabbed with shears in the back. I cut my foot to ribbons with the end of the fork first time I had to do it and was rushed off for a tetanus injection.” Linda, who lives at home with her parents and sister goes off food for about a week when she wants to look really super. She just lives on cheese and coffee. This way she can lose five pounds without trying. She was vague about future plans. She is in no rush to do another film and laughed at any idea of marriage. Richard Harris’s former wife, Elizabeth, and Rex Harrison are inseparable but Richard is cagey about marrying again and says, “Even Helen of Troy couldn’t drag me to the altar anyway Linda is too young and ambitious and I am too old and ambitious. I am going on forty!” With the help of a makeup artist from Eyelure, we show in step by step pictures how the skilful use of makeup can alter Linda’s (and your) features.

Shot 1—no makeup. Shot 2—Max Factor Pancake 085 was smoothed in with a dampened sponge to give an even base. Shot 3—Linda’s eyebrows were brushed upwards and outwards with a dampened mascara brush to give them a better shape. Foundation was blended well into the eyelids and then a light dusting of face powder was added with the sponge, to give a non-greasy finish. White Shadow Pearl used with water and stroked on gently with a brush, was used to highlight immediately under the eyebrow. Then Smokey Grey shadow used with water and carefully applied with a brush was used all over the lid, and brought round under the eye. A little white shadow pearl at the very roots of the eyelash made the eye appear more blended in. Top lashes were mascaraed from underneath with Max Factor’s black mascara. Finally feather light strokes of soft brown pencil were used to shape the brows. The lashes used were very natural– Eylure’s See Through Lash No. I in brown. They were put on carefully with tweezers, starting in the middle, then pressed gently into place. Next the bottom lashes were mascaraed from above. Black Short Trim Underlashes were used because bottom lashes tend to look lighter. These were also applied with tweezers. Shot 4—Shading was done with brushes for best effect. Eylure do twelve brushes for £6.6s. Using the Eylure Face Shaper Kit, the makeup artist put white highlighter on the cheekbone and plenty of brown shaker in the hollow of the cheek. This was done with upswept brush strokes and blended in so that it didn’t look just like a dirty smudge. Then more highlight was used under the shaper to bring out the lower jaw and finally dark shaper again was used along the jawline and underneath to give the chin more definition. Shot 5—A delicate tinge of blusher was blended in just below the cheekbone. With some good brushwork Linda’s cheekbones were re-discovered. Shot 6.—The final look with Estee Lauder’s lipstick Walnut, glossed up with vaseline.

Beauty by Ann Morrow.

Tunic top with hood from Way-In.

Photographed by Chris Holland.

Scanned from Petticoat, 23rd January 1971.