Inspirations

britt ekland, Catherine Deneuve, emma peel, jane birkin, jenny boyd, maureen starkey, natalie wood, oliver reed, ossie clark, pan's people, prince, sandie shaw, stevie nicks, the avengers

Down with lurgies and stress! Boo, and may I say, hiss. I haven’t felt much like posting here, or anywhere. I’m lining up some listings when I’m able though, and they should be up and running next week I hope. Until then, or until I have the energy to post properly again, here is a lovely, shiny post with lots of lovely inspirational images I’ve picked up here and there.













Hard Glam Rock

1970s, alkasura, british boutique movement, Copper Coin, eric clapton, Foale and Tuffin, glam rock, hard rock cafe, mary quant, maureen starkey, mr freedom, pete townshend, sheridan barnett, van der fransen

Left: Shirt by Hans Metzen at Elle. Midi tartan culottes by Foale and Tuffin. Boots by Sacha. Hat by Bermona / Right: Vest by Girl. Sujon pants and battle jacket by Vanessa Frye. Shoes by Sacha.

One of my favourite Petticoat spreads, from September 1971, which I haven’t scanned in full before (why? I have no idea….). It was photographed at the Hard Rock Cafe in London, and published a mere three months after it opened (June 1971). The Hard Rock was a different beast back then, the memorabilia which would later become such a huge part of its identity was a later addition and quite haphazardly acquired to begin with.

Isaac Tigrett (later to marry Maureen Starkey, whom he would often introduce as “My most authentic piece of rock and roll memorabilia.”) and Peter Morton opened their American-style diner in an old Rolls Royce dealership on Park Lane. It became an instant hit with their musician and music-loving friends. They could come along, post-gig, for a hit of fast food, good company and a relaxed atmosphere. The decor developed from eclectic Americana into iconic music memorabilia, as various musicians donated their old instruments and clothes to their beloved Hard Rock diner.

‘So Clapton got to be friends with the proprietors and asked them to save him a regular table, put up a brass plaque or something. And the young proprietors said, “Why don’t we put up your guitar?” They all had a chuckle, and he handed over a guitar, and they slapped it on the wall.

No one thought much more about it. Until a week later, when another guitar arrived (a Gibson Les Paul, by the way). With it was a note from Pete Townshend of The Who which read: “Mine’s as good as his. Love, Pete.” ‘

From the official Hard Rock website.

This photoshoot is a rare insight into how the Hard Rock would have looked when it first opened and before it acquired its now legendary status and worldwide domination.

It’s also packed full of glam rock, British Boutique goodness and is almost as delicious as a Hard Rock Apple Cobbler….

Photos by Roger Charity. Fashion by Sue Hone.

Tartan pinny with button sides by Foale and Tuffin. Vest with red trim and heart buttons by Dranella. Boots by Sacha.

Left: Rhona Roy smock, under pinny by Copper Coin. Shoes by Elliotts. / Right: Syndica vest from Girl. Skirt by Mr Freedom. Jewellery from Paradise Garage. Shoes by Sacha

Left: Velvet suit by Marielle. Sox by Mr Freedom. Shoes by Ravel. / Right: Bermudas by Foale and Tuffin. Sweater from Elle Shops. Bangles by Biba. Sox by Quant. Shoes by Mr Wik.

Copper Coin red and blue pinny by Sheridan Barnett. Black pants by Gordon King. Shirt by Alkasura. Shoes by Quant.

Smock by Copper Coin. Top by Van Der Fransen.

Build high for happiness

anna karina, brigitte bardot, Catherine Deneuve, diana rigg, hair, jane birkin, marianne faithfull, maureen starkey, natalie wood, picture spam, sandie shaw, susannah york, twiggy, veruschka

Much as I love big hair, sometimes it needs to be contained in an upwards direction. The Sixties saw some of the biggest, sleekest and most extravagant styles which took heavy inspiration from Victorian and Edwardian originals but with that new, more expressive modern sexuality.

It’s one of my biggest annoyances that women only really wear their hair in interesting up-dos for their wedding days. You should probably wear a hairstyle which is quintessentially ‘you’, not a style which you think you ought to wear. (My mum wore her hair down for her wedding, which would have been fairly unusual in the early Seventies, and I think she looks amazing for it. And very ‘her’, at the time.) If you are going to wear it up for your wedding, why not try wearing it up on an evening out? It doesn’t have to look WAG-sleek, think more along the Bardot-lines…

Of course many of these looks are so sleek and precisely pinned that you would definitely need assistance, but quite a few are not. And the best way to learn, is to practice. The most basic tips I could give would be to curl your hair first (straight hair is more slippery and curls give more volume and grip – and you need plenty of that!!!) and, until you’re more savvy, let the curls do most of the work for you. Keep it relatively messy until you’re used to how you like it pinned, placement on the head and where you need volume or loose hair. Then you can build up to more precise and extravagant works of art.

And keep looking at photos!!





















Just try not to get a crick in your neck when you’ve done a good job. It’s for other people to admire…

And my own feeble and basic attempt from a long time ago. It was so solid I drunkenly accidentally fell asleep and awoke the next morning to find it entirely in tact.

Random Picture Spam: Eyeliner

amanda lear, eyeliner, Françoise Hardy, Make-up, marianne faithfull, maureen starkey, natalie wood, pamela des barres, peggy moffitt, penelope tree, sandie shaw, sixties

I’m far too tired, achy and discombobulated to post anything too long and rambly tonight, so here’s a random picture post so I can attempt to maintain my unusual prolificacy at the moment….

I wish it were profligacy though; I love how I have to really think about which word I want to use. Ah well, that will come soon enough when I’ve recovered from the multitude of stresses which are upon me at the moment. And when it does, I will be wearing lots of eyeliner and lashes and drinking a lot of brandy. So just you watch out!

Well there you go, I was a bit rambly. Ha!













Dip Dyed Drew Barrymore

alexander mcqueen, debbie harry, drew barrymore, maureen starkey

This is something like the reverse colouration I want for my own hair (see Maureen Starkey with the blonde ends) but can’t have for L’Oreal-related reasons. I kinda like it on Drew, and I love the fact that it matches her dress. Admittedly it might look a bit odd with anything other than a matching [so beautiful I want to knaw it off her] Alexander McQueen dress, but kudos for being a bit daring. And a bit Debbie Harry as well. And that bird out of Berlin. I love how happy she looks here. That’s what a great dress can do to a girl….

Fashion Icon: Maureen Starkey

fashion icon of the moment, maureen starkey, mod, ringo starr, sixties, The Beatles

This is a bit of an intimidating Fashion Icon post to do, because Senti is the doyenne of all things Mo. But she has very kindly sent me a pile of images with which to work. Thank you!

Maureen Starkey is by far and away the most admirable Beatle-wife, in my opinion. Not least because she had to put up with Ringo, but also because she was there from the very beginning. She wasn’t a model. She wasn’t an actress. She had been a hairdresser and was now a full time wife and mother, who still had to be the perfect accessory to her superstar husband. She performed this role beautifully, without ever overshadowing Ringo and never once looking like she would dearly love to thump the impossibly beautiful Pattie Boyd. Maureen was a woman’s woman. Kudos Mo!

Early on, her look was pure mod perfection. Immaculately coiffed hair, super sleek dresses and suits, and impeccably applied eye make-up to bring out her already quite spectacularly huge eyes. But Maureen was no follower. She was hugely experimental with her hair and make-up, especially in later Beatle years when her clothing also underwent a few gear changes. She did the maternity look exceptionally well in all eras, and was never afraid to try out different looks – particularly the notoriously hard-to-pull-off mannish suits and ties.

My personal favourite look is the hotpants, suede boots, [possibly] Mr Freedom t-shirt and bleached-end hair look, but there are lots to choose from. She probably tried every look you might dare to think of. Sometimes successful, sometimes not, but you’ve got to salute that haven’t you? Mo, you were truly awesome and you also helped give us the Hard Rock Cafe. We salute you!

Things I have discovered in the last few days

ashes to ashes, david sylvian, hard rock cafe, maureen starkey

Vintage Marmalade with Brandy is one of the most heavenly substances known to man.

L’Oreal are evil. They put lead and plastic in their [allegedly] semi-permanent hair dye, don’t list them on the box and Miss Peelpants is thus finding it difficult to achieve her new ideal hair-do in the style of Maureen Starkey. Boo hiss.

Maureen Starkey is the best Beatle-wife.

I have no navigational skills whatsoever.

Venus and Mars are both in my Seventh House at the moment, apparently. I don’t really know what this means, but it sounds scary.

Hard Rock Cafe Pina Coladas are the third most heavenly substance known to man (after the aforementioned marmalade and Cinnabons). I already knew this, but it needed reiterating after Friday night.

Actually perhaps David Sylvian is the most heavenly substance known to man? Or, rather, woman.

Everyone else in the world meets David Tennant and I don’t. I was in Cardiff, it was the perfect time for the Gods to throw me a Tennant. Grumble.

Proper costumed guides who can stay in character are brilliant. And I never have any questions when someone asks if anyone has any questions. Why?

Ashes to Ashes writers are evil geniuses.

Having your back painted with acrylics is really rather lovely.

Anyway. I am now returned from my adventures and will be bringing you some gorgeous new listings as soon as possible!