The Velvet Touch

1970s, biba, bill gibb, charles jourdan, christopher mcdonnell, harpers and queen, Inspirational Images, Jaeger, janice wainwright, laura ashley, Marida, oliver goldsmith, Russell & Bromley, Terence Donovan, Vintage Editorials
The Velvet Touch - Terence Donovan - Harpers November 1974 a

Velvet jacket and matching skirt by Christopher McDonnell. Hat by Laura Ashley. Wallpaper by Laura Ashley.

Velvets have gone into print this winter. Dashing suits and jackets come in all the mutations of the earth, sea and sky and are designed to be worn before rather than after dark. They look a million dollars and sometimes don’t even cost that much.

Photographed by Terence Donovan.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, November 1974.

The Velvet Touch - Terence Donovan - Harpers November 1974 b

Jacket and cream shirt embroidered with corn ears and matching skirt, all by Bill Gibb. Navy leather boots from Russell & Bromley.

The Velvet Touch - Terence Donovan - Harpers November 1974 c

Rayon velvet jacket in Persian print and black rayon velvet skirt, both by Biba. Rust crepe de chine shirt by Otto. Sunglasses by Oliver Goldsmith. Beret by Marida. Wallpaper from Laura Ashley.

The Velvet Touch - Terence Donovan - Harpers November 1974 e

Velvet jacket and matching skirt by Jaeger. Scarf by Rodier. Hat by Marida. Sunglasses by Oliver Goldmith. Boots by Charles Jourdan. Wallpaper by Biba.

The Velvet Touch - Terence Donovan - Harpers November 1974 d

Velvet jacket in splodgy print with matching skirt and Viyella blouse, all by Janice Wainwright.

 

Vintage Adverts: There’s an authority on every subject

19 magazine, 1970s, Inspirational Images, Jaeger, Jan de Villeneuve, Vintage Adverts

jaeger 19 magazine september 70

I… I don’t even know where to start with this one. Except that the clothes are lovely and that it has the lovely Jan de Villeneuve in it (and how she’s managing to look so cool with all that going on in the background I will never know…).

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, September 1970

Inspirational Images: Warm and fuzzy

1970s, Angela at London Town, biba, british boutique movement, bus stop, C&A, chelsea cobbler, elisabeth novick, gerald mccann, gordon king, Inspirational Images, Jaeger, James Drew, lee bender, mary farrin, mary quant, Russell & Bromley, vanity fair, Vintage Editorials, wallis, zapata
vanity fair 2

Left: Coat by Young Jaeger. Trousers by Angela at London Town. Shirt by James Drew. Striped waistcoat at Bus Stop. Right: Borg jacket by Gerald McCann. Angora trousers by Mary Farrin. Socks by Mary Quant. Clogs by The Chelsea Cobbler at Russell and Bromley.

Photographed by Elisabeth Novick. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, October 1971

vanity fair 1

Left: ‘Monkey’ jacket by Gordon King. Checked Oxford bags by Bus Stop. Shirt from Bus Stop. Authentic Forties head by Zapata. Veiling from Biba. Right: Short furry jacket from Wallis. Trousers from C&A. Shirt from James Drew. Hand-knitted waistcoat from Bus Stop.

Got the Glitterbug…

1960s, 1970s, british boutique movement, chelsea girl, georgina linhart, Jaeger, Marnie Fogg, personal collection, quorum, wallis
Glitterbug (1972) from Marnie Fogg's Boutique

Glitterbug (1972) from Marnie Fogg’s Boutique

For some reason, I have shied away from posting about my collection much in recent years. I suppose it’s always been somewhat fluid; things come and go when times are hard or when something better comes along. But recently I acquired something which had always been a bit of a ‘holy grail’ for me, and it reminded me of exactly why I love fashion history, collecting and researching.

One of the most important books on my road to total geekery was Marnie Fogg’s Boutique: A ’60s Cultural Icon. Amazon kindly (and terrifyingly) informs me that I purchased it exactly ten years ago. Although clearly not comprehensive, something I am now realising is probably impossible, it was my main gateway into understanding the boutique phenomenon as a whole. I already knew many of the designers – and was delighted to see how much space was dedicated to John Bates – but several were new names to me. One of these was Georgina Linhart. Another graduate of St Martin’s College of Art and Design, Linhart set up her label in 1964 and, while she was frequently featured in the top magazines of the period, her business only ran for ten years. She later worked for Quorum, Jaeger, Wallis and Chelsea Girl. All four of which are favourite vintage labels chez Vintage-a-Peel.

Georgina Linhart, 1970

Georgina Linhart, 1970

The more time went on, the more I realised how rare examples of her work must be these days. My eBay search was empty 99% of the time, and only occasionally turned up magazine features and a couple of jackets. The most distinctive dress pictured in Fogg’s Boutique book was ‘Glitterbug’ (see above). A sequined halterneck mini dress, gossamer light and substantial in its insubstantiality; so quintessentially of its time, the epitome of the permissive age.

So my heart was in my mouth when Glitterbug turned up on eBay a couple of months ago. It was slightly out of my price range at the time, and the recent events in my life had forced me to re-evaluate what was important (and worth getting into debt for). So I sat and watched it. Every day I would log into eBay, with one eye shut, and check if anyone had bought it. Every day it was still there, but my nerves were getting beyond frazzled. So the day I finally felt marginally less broke than normal, was the day I logged in and put in a cheeky best offer. I am impossibly grateful to the seller for accepting it and making my collector dreams come true. It has been a long time coming, and it has come a long way from the USA, but Glitterbug is finally in my collection. Plus, it fits me – which I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t have done ten years ago. What are the odds?

Glitterbug (1972) from my personal collection

Glitterbug (1972) from my personal collection

Mensday: What’s new in men’s fashion? by Michael Heath

1960s, austin reed, His Clothes, Honey Magazine, Jaeger, Mensday, menswear, Michael Heath, Raoul Men's Shop
What's new in men's fashion? What's in it for them ... and for us? Keep your boyfriend tuned in to Michael Heath's fashion report

What’s new in men’s fashion? What’s in it for them … and for us? Keep your boyfriend tuned in to Michael Heath’s fashion report

Indeed Mr Heath, ‘why pea?’ indeed… Personally I would dearly love to take my boyfriend along to Raoul Men’s Shop for a pair of brown cossack boots. And elephant cord trousers, why is elephant cord so maligned these days? The lack of these things in the world today is why life has become so dull and dreary.

Illustrated by Michael Heath. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, January 1965

Inspirational Images: Jaeger Jacket

1970s, david bailey, Inspirational Images, Jaeger, Vogue

jaeger

Photographed by David Bailey. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, March 1972

Video: London Fashion, 1975

1970s, Bernshaw, bill gibb, british boutique movement, bus stop, Jaeger, Jane Cattlin, Janet Ibbotson, katharine hamnett, lee bender, ossie clark, stirling cooper, tuttabankem, Yuki

Oh I do so love finding a ‘new’ video such as this on Youtube – many thanks to the uploader. Promoting the 1974 London Fashion Show at Earls Court (featuring designs by Frank Usher and Bernshaw in the footage) it then moves to a variety of locations (Trafalgar Square, Regent’s Canal, random studio, back to Trafalgar Square…) to promote clothes by legends such as Ossie Clark, Bill Gibb, Lee Bender for Bus Stop, Yuki, Stirling Cooper and ‘Kate Hamnett’ for Tuttabankem, it also features the underrated [and somewhat forgotten] designers Jane Cattlin and Janet Ibbotson. Enjoy!