Today’s Paper

1970s, 1980s, alice pollock, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Over 21, post modernism, roger stowell
She wears: Vivien Knowland’s paper ‘coolie’ hat, a fan necklace to make as well, and a stripey strapless knitted top by Alice Pollock and Catherine Blair, £20 at 16 Russell Street, London WC2. Paper fan, comes with wooden stand, £5.94 from Ehrman, 123 Fulham Road, London SW3.

Light, bright, plain or pleated, it’s the new way to put colour back into your home and fun into furnishing.

Photographed by Roger Stowell.

Scanned from Over 21 Magazine, April 1979.

Kaffe Fassett’s Peony and Mosaic Bedroom

1970s, horrockses, interior design, interiors, James Mortimer, Kaffe Fassett, sanderson, Vogue

Starting with the pale pink of peonies for the walls, Kaffe Fassett built a room of mosaic and flower patterns. Inside the arch: a bed with Gazebo sheets from the new Horrockses’ Wamsutta range. Oriental carpets from Franses of Piccadilly. Strips of mosaic pattern from Sanderson wallpapers. Paintings, needlework cushion by Kaffe Fassett. The shower cubicle, Tahiti by Leisure, a surprise in a bedroom, but it fits. Horrockses’ towels. Porcelain pots, shells and shell boxes, cane and lacquer furniture. Patchwork quilts.

Photographed by James Mortimer.

Scanned from Vogue, February 1975.

A Room to Linger In

1970s, cosmopolitan, Harry Hartman, interior design, interiors, thea porter, Tim Street-Porter
Dishy model Michel Julien playing it cool in David Evers’ masculine bathroom.

The bathroom as an erogenous zone.

No room is more intimate than your bathroom. There is nowhere better to relax and get in the mood … to succumb to the sheer sensuality of soaking in scented water, indulging fantasies and anticipating future pleasures.

Your bathroom should be a place to feel beautiful in. to lacquer your toenails or finish a novel, henna your hair, water your plants or even paint a picture. No reason why it shouldn’t be your bathroom-boudoir-dressing-room-studio all in one. Even better if there’s room for a bed .. .

The bathroom is where you imprint your personality. Dare to be exotic with jungle prints, orchids growing in glass tanks. Or keep it cool with ice-white decor, stark modern art, a Japanese Bonsai tree.

Whatever your style, remember the importance of warmth, the comforting feel of thick pile rugs and heated towels. There’s no greater turn-off than getting goose pimples in a chilly cheerless bathroom. We photographed three highly individual bathrooms designed with great flair, and each styled perfectly for their owner’s lives. But all with a single thought in common—comfort.

The lure of the East for international fashion designer, Thea Porter. She designed her Mayfair bathroom with a Moorish interior in mind . . . wide built-in seats with heavily embroidered cushions. a little arch cut into the wall to display treasured objects. Thea doubles her exciting room as a studio, hangs her paintings around the walls.

If you want to please a man, model your bathroom on the one good-looking London businessman David Evers owns, with handsome polished mahogany fitted units, ivory backed brushes and green plants. David says the atmosphere reminds him of a St James’ men’s club.

The third is a fiery red hideaway, a fantastic design by Richard Ohrbach for New Yorker Cynthia Peltz. There’s more than a touch of the womb about this room—very comfortable after a hard day at the office …

Text by Joan Prust-Walters.

Photographs by Tim Street Porter.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, January 1974.

Our model Carole Augustine looks very relaxed in Thea Porter’s bathroom which is just like a Seraglio.
Cynthia PeIlls bathroom is a warm hideaway. (Photographed by Harry Hartman).

Come Clean

19 magazine, 1960s, interior design, interiors
This special 19 bathroom was planned on a budget of £200, which includes all the fixtures and the plumbing. Designed by Igal Yawetz, Dip. Arch. Ham. I.E.A.I. and built by Allied Ironfounders Ltd.

Own up! Do you really spend enough time in your bathroom?

We hate to admit it but bath-time in Britain is generally regarded as a dreary, unnecessary drudge! Maybe unpleasant memories of exasperated mum dragging us bodily up the stairs and scrubbing off sand, chocolate, grease and the like, have something to do with it, but we want, to prove that bathing can be lots of fun. Start by thinking of your bathroom as something more than just a box with a bath, somewhere at the back of your house. Think of it as a welcoming, comfortable room filled with glorious beauty products and your favourite luxuries; a place where you can hide from the family and white away many hours relaxing, reading and preening yourself after a busy, demanding, harassed day.

Photographer uncredited.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, November 1968.

Women Who Know

1970s, Hermès, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Vintage Adverts, Vogue
Les femmes décidées vont jusqu’au bout… Jusqu’au Parfum.

Just a pretty flawless aesthetic which I felt needed to be noted.

Advert for Calèche by Hermès.

Scanned from Vogue, November 1971.

The Smith Spectacular

1970s, Christopher Vane Percy, Henry Clarke, interior design, interiors, leonard, Vogue, zandra rhodes
Maxine Smith in the bedroom, where the four-poster is set on a mirrored podium. Her satin nightdress and jacket by Zandra Rhodes. Hair by Celine at Leonard.

DRESSED BY ZANDRA RHODES STAGED BY MAXINE SMITH

Maxine and Gary Smith moved to London from New York in 1971. Since then, Gary Smith, American television producer and winner of several Emmy Awards, has been working with Sir Lew Grade on television spectaculars, and Maxine Smith has been planning their London flat with Zandra Rhodes. The combination of their ideas has worked perfectly, with one taking over where the other left off. Initially, Zandra Rhodes designed a series of fabrics. Maxine Smith then had them printed to her own colour pattern by Alex McIntyre, often using the same colourway and design on different fabrics so that texture changes have been subtly worked from cotton to felt to satin. Some sur-faces are flat, others gathered – as in the hall where felt blends with draped cotton. Throughout there is an instantaneous impact of colour, wit and comfort. As one becomes accustomed to the colours, one realises that the sitting-room is designed for midnight rather than midday, the windows permanently shuttered and the curtains drawn. One notices the enormous portrait of Lenny Bruce by Gary Smith, ‘twenties’ armchairs with covered feet found by Maxine Smith in Antique City, the Vogue needlepoint cushions all worked by her mother. In the bedroom, apricot satin and taffetas with a felt print ceiling and apricot-coloured cupboards, the bed set on a mirrored podium, and covered with cushions. Other points of colour are the red telephone, the amber carpet. Next, a completely cupboarded dressing-room. Then, the apricot bathroom. Downstairs, past a neon sign—”I love Max”—and other such illuminations, to the dining-room: originally a cellar, now a brilliant blue small tent. The kitchen has dark rust-coloured prints, the ceiling hung with a thousand cooking utensils and an enormous electric lamp bulb found at Selfridges. Just off the kitchen a bar, a platform bat on steps, with three-tier cushions as bar stools, and an embroidery of Whistler’s mother by Malcolm Poynter, which came from the DM Gallery, Fulham Road. London’s galleries and off-beat furniture shops have produced many other pieces of art and amusement, some of them transformed by Zandra Rhodes’ coverings, others untouched, all with a special blend of humour and art.

Photographed by Henry Clarke.

Scanned from Vogue, late April 1975.

The downstairs bar with Malcolm Poynter’s embroidery of Whistler’s mother in the background, cushions instead of bar stools.
Two views of the sitting-room, Maxine Smith wearing a Zandra Rhodes’ dress of the same print as the walls—”The dress came first, the walls followed.” All fabrics by Zandra Rhodes, from the range at Christopher Vane Percy, 5 Weighhouse St, W.1
The garden room leading off the bar.
The hall draped with cotton print.
The blue tent dining-room with candlesticks by Carole McNicholl

Mirror Mirror

1970s, hair, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Vintage Adverts
Wella Spray – it holds and brushes out and holds and smells nice and holds and resists damp and holds… Wella – we know about hair.

I posted an alternate version of this, many years ago, but this one shows you far more of the amazing collaged wall behind the gloriously jumbled dressing table.

Scanned from Honey, June 1972.

On the sands of summertime

1970s, anello and davide, annacat, barry lategan, Bombacha, Brigid Martineau, Buckle Under, Casa Pupo, Charles Batten, chelsea cobbler, Crocker Wilson, Diane Logan, Early Bird, edward mann, Inspirational Images, jap, jeff banks, Joseph, Juliet Dunn, katharine hamnett, Ken Lane, kenzo, laura ashley, liberty, liberty's, Rayne, Rosie Nice, Russell & Bromley, sanderson, sarah frearson, Scott Adie, Sujon, The Purple Shop, Vintage Editorials, Vogue, wallis
Long and frilly flower print cotton frocks, all at Wallis main branches. Peachy, below left, a puff-sleeved shirt with deep skirt frill. £12.95. Pink, green, red, white chintzy parasol with sapling handle, £15.50, Crocker-Wilson. Straw with bright ribbon and flowers, Edward Mann, £3.40, at Barkers. Flower and bird glass necklace, £3.50, Bombacha. Flowered cream papier-mache bangles, £7 each, at Emeline. Peachy, below right, with wide sleeves and sash. £13.95. Green/white leafy parasol, £34.50, at Crocker-Wilson; Elle. Wide lacy straw with flowers, by Buckle Under, £11, at Lucienne Phillips ; Smiths, Bath. Cotton and lace drawstring bag, £4.50, at Rosie Nice. Bunches of sweet peas, by Novelty Import Co. Inky blue and brown frock, opposite left, extra beige and scarlet flowers, ecru lace and sweetheart neckline, £15.95. Red/white/green striped parasol, £19.50, Crocker-Wilson. Light blue glass beads, 80p, at Rosie Nice. Rough straw with chocolate velvet, creamy flowers, by Sarah Frearson, £13.75, Lucienne Phillips. Provençal cotton drawstring bag, £3.75, from Brother Sun. Sky blue, brown, natural frock, below centre, in two—camisole lacy top and skirt £15.95. Sandy lacy shawl, £8, at Scott Adie. Opaque amber glass fruit beads, about £28, from Emeline. Plum, blue, orange cotton, right, with lots of lace. £18.95. Sky blue lace shawl, as above. Flowered black chintz and tasselled parasol, £25.50, Crocker-Wilson. Enamel pansy brooch, on silver chain, £6.50, at The Purple Shop. Liberty print Country Cotton drawstring bag, by Brigid Martineau, £7.25, at Harrods. Canvas espadrilles, both pages, £3.50, from The Chelsea Cobbler.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, May 1974.

Green, cream and red Liberty printed Tana Lawn halter dress, left, a salad of flowers shirred to the hips. with tiny frills. About £32, at Annacat: Harvey Nichols. Pink, white and blue glass beads, bangle, ring, from Rosie Nice. Cream and green cotton dress, right, trellised and bordered with flowers, flounced and bordered with lace. By Earlybird, about £14.95, from Earlybird; Fenwick. Glass flower necklace, £12, The Purple Shop. Blue bird’s nest earrings, £1.50, Bombacha. White nylon openwork gloves, by Kir, about 95p, John Lewis. Flowers by Novelty Import Co. Deep green and red night-flowering smock, right, each tier with creamy lace. Liberty Country Cotton, by Sujon, £23, Liberty; Parkers of Hampstead; SuperStar; Leeds. Matching green flowered hand-bag with wrist strap, by Brigid Martineau, £7.75, at Harrods. Green/red bird sparkling necklace, Bombacha, £3.50. Espadrilles, £3.50, The Chelsea Cobbler. Hair by Christopher at Vidal Sassoon. Sanderson Wallpaper. Smilax leaves from Pulbrook & Gould. Bird-cage from Casa Pupo. Budgerigars from A1 Studio, 164 Princes Gdns, W.3.
Pale blue, ivory, light terracotta Liberty print Tana Lawn and lace flouncing skirt, above left. Cap-sleeved top. By Sujon, £24, Liberty; SuperStar, Leeds. Long frilled white petticoat, £4.75, at all Laura Ashley branches. Lacy straw, with harebells, by Buckle Under, £10, at Lucienne Phillips;’ Smiths, Bath. Glass beads and flower necklace round wrist, £3.50. Bombacha. Embroidered white espadrilles, £7.99, Russell & Bromley main branches. Black and bright red flowered white jacket; frilled skirt,: above right, piped in black and white. By Jeff Banks, £14.50, £13.50, at Selfridges; Adele Davis. Petticoat, as above. Straw hat, £14, at Diane Logan. Blue bead bracelet, 80p, Rosie Nice. Espadrilles, as above. Blue, scarlet, cream Liberty print Tana Lawn flowered shirred top and skirt, opposite left. About £13, £19.95, at Annacat; Harvey Nichols ; Unicorn, Birmingham. Ribboned straw, Edward Mann, £2.50, at John Lewis. Flowered cream papier mache bangles, £7 each, Emeline. Lacy shawl, £8, from Scott Adie, Flower necklace, £2.50, at Bombacha. Cream chocolate laced boots, £13.95, Anello & Davide. Powder blue, green, pink cotton pleated skirt and cap-sleeved crossover top, cenre. By Jap, £25.95, £16.95, at Jap & Joseph. Espadrilles, £3.50, The Chelsea Cobbler. Lacy shawl, as above. Straw hat, Buckle Under, £11, at Lucienne Phillips. Powder blue, cream, beige tiered pleated skirt, right: Liberty print Tana Lawn with creamy lace and matching button-down bodice. About £23, £14, by Juliet Dunn, at ZigZag; Adele Davis; Smiths, Bath. Green straw with flowers, £14, at Diane Logan and Hampstead Bazaar. Cream laced espadrilles, £6.50, front Rayne at Harvey Nichols. Mother-of-pearl leaf necklace, about £15, Emeline. Hair by Christopher at Vidal Sassoon. Fishing gear, front Harrods. Picnic hampers and raffia bags, all from Habitat. Liberty print Dick Whittington bags and care shopping basket, all from Liberty. Stripy parasol, £19.50, from Crocker-Wilson.
Rose crepe de chine dress, far left, flowered brightly red and white. With V neck, slightly gathered sleeve. Jeff Banks, about £21, at Jeff Banks Shop ; Puella, Croydon, Purley and Reigate. Pale straw bowler with flower-painted brim, Diane Logan, £8. White beads with red and white flowers, Rosie Nice, from a selection, from 60p. Gold locket engraved with flying bird, Goldmine at Woolworths. Rose and cream flowered Liberty cotton and leather purse, Chris Trill, £13, at Flight Studio ; Jap & Joseph. White nylon gloves, by Cornelia James. Sunglasses, Elle. Eau de nil crepe de chine dress, centre, stippled with beige and white flowers. Jeff Banks, about 823.95, Jeff Banks Shop ; Puella, Croydon, Purley and Reigate. Blonde straw with a bunch of harebells, Buckle Under, £10 at Lucienne Phillips ; Smiths, Bath. Mother-of-pearl leaf necklace, about £15, at Emeline. Flowered glass brooch, £1.50, at Bombacha. Eau de nil leather purse with quilted flower sides. £30, to order from Clive Shilton. Eau de nil and grey silky cotton gloves with violet/blue embroidered cuffs, £5 Browns. Clear flower-patterned Perspex sunglasses, £25.95, Elle, Bond St and Sloane Square. Snake bangle, £2.50, Mulberry Co at Selfridges. Gold bangle, £16.75, Andre Bogaert. Gold rings, from £5.50, at Ken Lane. Sepia flowered crepe de chine dress to mid-calf, left. Sujon, £15, at Liberty ; Image, Bath ; Super-star, Leeds. Flat straw with cream petersham, £7.50, Charles Batten. Mother-of-pearl hat pin, £1, Diane Logan. Pale cream, yellow fake orchids, Crocker-Wilson, £1.65 a pair. Seed pearls, Corocraft, from range at Peter Robinson. Raffia purse, Chris Trill, .E7.70, at Flight Studios ; Jap & Joseph. Speckled cream net gloves, by Katherine Hamnett for Tuttabankem, £3, Browns. Ivory, gold and diamond, pale amber rings, £4, £25, £4, Andre Bogaert.

Move in, Move on

1970s, cosmopolitan, Dominique Depalle, interior design, interiors, Michael Boys
Dominique’s bath can be replumbed when she moves; a wall-hanging can be more easily removed than tiles.

You may hate to be tied down by your possessions, but naturally you get attached to them. For a more flexible life-style, learn from Dominique Depalle and choose furnishing that moves where she does.

If you’ve spent longer in France than a weekend, you’ve probably noticed that most French girls have a greater sense of style by the time they are twenty than the rest of us will ever acquire. Instead of always trying to beat those clever ladies in the style stakes—and not quite succeeding — we should swallow our English pride and learn from them. Take Parisian Dominique Depalle, for instance, who has cunningly transformed a drab studio flat—the equivalent of a big-city bedsit or rented flat in a dingy Victorian house—into a warm, feminine home that looks as though it might have cost a fortune, but didn’t, thanks to Dominique’s experience as an antique dealer. She has a sharp eye for spotting bargains in junk. Dominique recently gave up her job in advertising to turn her hobby—collecting antiques—into a full-time occupation. Like Dominique, most girls in their late teens and twenties expect to swop flats, jobs, even cities, several times. Dominique decorates on the sensible principle that if she’s going to move on, she should be able to take all her favourite possessions with her when she goes. There’s not a fitted carpet, built-in cupboard or roll of wallpaper in the place. Dominique chooses every item with infinite care because she knows that each object will last a lifetime… like the Victorian bath, which could easily be transported with the help of a friendly lorry driver, and replumbed in another flat ; the huge tiger wall-hanging, not as practical as tiles, maybe, but then you can’t start taking down the tiles every time you have an altercation with your landlord. A bundle of small objects—baskets, ornaments and framed photographs—will pack easily into a suitcase. And by keeping walls plain wherever she goes, Dominique can be certain that her intricate wall-hangings, pictures and flowery bed-coverings will blend with every setting. Dominique dreams of eventually having a proper house—with a staircase, a loft and a cellar for apples and wine. Meanwhile she longs for adventure in her life and is thinking of going to live in Africa for a few years. If you, like Dominique, get itchy feet after more than a few months in the same place—but still want somewhere pretty to come home to —remember that your possessions should be as mobile as you are.

Photographed by Michael Boys.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1977.

Favourite objects show off Dominique’s individual style.
With plain walls, flowery fabrics blend in any room.
Dominique sells antiques at work and buys them for a hobby. Evenings at home are spent restoring her miniature replicas of old furniture

You know how good it feels (Part 2)

19 magazine, 1970s, Austin Garritt, biba, David Anthony, Deco Inspired, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors, Jane Goddard, janet reger, Simpson of Piccadilly

As promised, the follow up to yesterday’s post featuring a stunning image of all the prizes which were available in this competition. A satin Biba lounging outfit, Janet Reger underwear and a dozen bottles of Laurent Perrier champagne is probably still my idea of covetable luxury!

Modelled by Jane Goddard.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1974.