Heads you win

1970s, alkasura, Andreas George, Bermona, Feathers, hans feurer, hats, Inspirational Images, Jean Charles Brosseau, jean shrimpton, liberty, liberty's, mr freedom, quorum, ritva, sunday times magazine, Vintage Editorials
One of a selection of hats designed by Andreas George that are decorated with anything from fake flowers, ribbons, plastic fruit to tiny furry animals. £7 from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3

Suddenly this summer the shops are selling masses of hats that before would have only been dug up for garden parties, weddings, sports days or camping it up. For years magazines and designers have shown their clothes with hats, but they don’t usually turn up in the street. Fashion editors often feature ‘picture hats’ like those on the previous page posed in some romantic setting or framing an immaculate new make-up, but one never actually sees them on a number 19 bus. Now hats have gone the way of all clothes; there are no rules; you can wear anything with anything. Any hat, whether it’s wide-brimmed and floppy with half a haberdashery department stuck over it, or a small crocheted cloche pinned with a bunch of plastic fruit, i fine with either nostalgic Forties’ dresses or a dirty old pair of jeans. And you can still wear it to a wedding if you want to.

Modelled by Jean Shrimpton.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, June 20th 1971.

Smooth straw hat with fake anemones, by Bermona, £2.85 from Dickins and Jones.
Cotton cloche pinned back with a bunch of cherries if you like, £4.50 from Quorum. Check and spot crepe shirt £4.20 from Mr Freedom, 20 Kensington Church Street. White cotton shorts by Ritva £7.88 from Countdown, 137 King’s Road.
Pink felt hat with bright harlequin pattern under the brim by Jean Charles Brosseau, £7 from Feathers, 43 Kensington High Street.
Plain wide-brimmed panama hat, £2.85 from Liberty’s.

Inspirational Images: Nile Journey

1970s, british boutique movement, chelsea cobbler, david bailey, Feathers, Inspirational Images, jean shrimpton, ossie clark, quorum, Vogue

At the temple of Karnak, Jean Shrimpton wears a white Terylene gabardine suit in sharp and beautiful shape. Ossie Clark at Quorum. White hite at Feathers. White platforms shoes with silver roses, by Richard Smith for The Chelsea Cobbler.

At the temple of Karnak, Jean Shrimpton wears a white Terylene gabardine suit in sharp and beautiful shape. Ossie Clark at Quorum. White hat at Feathers. White platform shoes with silver roses, by Richard Smith for The Chelsea Cobbler.

Photographed by Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, January 1972

Inspirational Images: Jean Shrimpton in Foale and Tuffin

1970s, british boutique movement, david bailey, Foale and Tuffin, Inspirational Images, jean shrimpton, Vogue

foale tuffin shrimpton bailey oct 72

Photographed by Bailey. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, October 1972

Inspirational Images: Jean Shrimpton in Pablo & Delia

1970s, david bailey, Inspirational Images, jean shrimpton, pablo and delia, Vogue

Photographed by David Bailey

Photographed by David Bailey

Against the trompe l’oeil backdrops of a photographer’s portrait studio in Luxor High Street. Cake-frill blouse of flocked black voile, halter-necked, meeting at the waist and tying together at the back, and black linen trousers with big red polka dot. Green bead and red bow necklace. By Pablo & Delia, £20, at Browns.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, January 1972

Inspirational Images: Veruschka and Jean Shrimpton

1970s, Inspirational Images, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, jean shrimpton, veruschka

Veruschka and Jean Shrimpton by Jacques-Henri Lartigue

Scanned from the British Journal of Photography Annual 1972

If anyone can point me towards what photoshoot this might be a candid from, I would be exceedingly grateful!

Inspirational Images: Shrimp in Silk

1960s, Inspirational Images, jean shrimpton, Photoplay, vanessa clark

Scanned from Photoplay, April 1967

Small feature on Jean Shrimpton’s clothes for her film debut in Privilege with Paul Jones.

I hate admitting I’ve not heard of a designer before, but Vanessa Clark is coming up as a blank for me.

Anyone?

In praise of [slightly] older women

1960s, 1970s, 1980s, brigitte bardot, charlotte rampling, diana rigg, Françoise Hardy, grace coddington, Inspirational Images, jacqueline bisset, jane birkin, jean shrimpton, picture spam, twiggy, veruschka, yasmin le bon

Diana Rigg in the early Seventies (in her mid-thirties)

They were all beautiful in their twenties, and they remain beautiful to this day, but I have come to the conclusion that many of my favourite women looked their very, very best in their thirties and early forties. Which may or may not be somewhat biased by my own entering of my thirties. Ok, so I entered them three years ago but still… I think it is an important thing to notice, when all around are becoming consumed by vanity and their faces destroyed by undesirable injectables.

The puppy fat has fallen away, the features now more defined and enhanced by laughter lines and emerging cheekbones. They look relaxed; as if the pressure of ‘looking good’, which so restrains a teen or twenty-something, has lifted with the knowledge that none of it really matters a great deal. Maybe they’ve had a baby, maybe they don’t want to, maybe they’re still waiting for the right moment (Diana Rigg was 39 when she had Rachael). They know any man worth his salt won’t mind seeing them without make-up, and that he doesn’t really care about the size of their breasts or backsides. They know how swiftly life is passing, how much has been missed already, and how relatively little retains its importance ten or twenty years later. They don’t try to make up for their age by ignoring it or trying to behave like teenagers, they simply embrace the things which are worth embracing. They still make mistakes, but can handle them with good grace.

I realise I am making the cardinal mistake of putting words into people’s mouths and making sweeping generalisations, but I wanted to express how looking at these women makes me feel. And how it reminds me of why it is ok for me to have changed, to have matured and to have grown into my appearance. We all have moments when we wish we still had all that youth on our side, but a few quick glances at things I wrote, men I dated or photographs of myself ten years ago – soon remind me that I didn’t know anything, had very poor taste in men and was quite chubby in the face. All things I am glad to have [hopefully] grown out of.

So whether you are here (there) already, or have it yet to come, I hope you can remember these incredible women and weep for the stupidity of the likes of Lindsey Lohan, Lara Flynn Boyle or Carla Bruni. Plus, don’t forget to check back in with me in ten years time and see if I’ve started saying that ‘actually they looked better in their fifties…’.

Apologies for vague dating of some pictures, the tumblr effect means that very few are dated for me and I’ve had to do a certain amount of guesswork… Also, certain people I think looked lovely in their thirties have gone on to have pretty lousy work done to their faces and have, consequently, not been featured here. That’ll teach ’em!

Jane Birkin, 1982 (aged 36)

Brigitte Bardot in 1972, aged 38

Jean Shrimpton in the mid Seventies, in her early thirties

Charlotte Rampling in 1984 (aged 38)

Jacqueline Bisset in 1977 (aged 33)

Veruschka in 1972 (aged 33)

Françoise Hardy in the early Eighties (in her late thirties)

Grace Coddington in 1974 (aged 33)

Brigitte Bardot in the late Sixties (in her mid thirties)

Jacqueline Bisset in 1984 (aged 40)

Diana Rigg c.1974 (aged 36)

Charlotte Rampling in 1977 (aged 31)

Twiggy in 1983 (aged 34)

Françoise Hardy in the late Seventies (in her mid thirties)

Jean Shrimpton in 1979 (aged 37)

And in case you needed any more evidence, please see Duran Duran’s now infamous supermodel-stuffed video for Girl Panic!. Personally I believe they all look far, far better than they did in their modelling heyday.

Jean Shrimpton – At Home With Fashion

1970s, bus stop, cherry twiss, coopers, janice wainwright, jean shrimpton, jean-loup sieff, ossie clark, sonia rykiel, telegraph magazine

“It is so beautifully cut”. Sabbath Suit by Ossie Clark.

As with so many of my favourite people, I far prefer ‘Seventies Shrimpton’ to her earlier, more famous Bailey-era. This photoshoot is from The Telegraph Magazine, April 1973, and shows Jean returning to the family farm – decked out in all the best designers of the time.

Jean Shrimpton has gained fame, fortune and glamour through her spectacular modelling career, but she seldom spends much money on clothes – although she will, on occasions, treat herself to an extravagance from Ossie Clark, one of her favourite designers. So we asked her to make her own practical choice from the clothes that are in the shops now. We photographed her at her parents’ home – Rose Hill Farm, Burnham in Buckinghamshire.

“Basically I always choose dark clothes because they are practical and don’t show the dirt. I like fairly simple, well-cut, Forties type clothes with big shoulders. I wear a lot of trousers and long skirts and prefer jackets to coats. If I do wear colour it is usually in tights or shoes”

Images scanned by Miss Peelpants

“I like long skirts and I liked the shape of this sweater with the cuffed sleeves and the lower neckline”. Sweater by Rykiel.

“Super, very Forties, lovely grey colour, loose and easy to move in. Very much the sort of thing I wear”. Suit by Coopers.

“A nice simple dress that could be worn anytime”. Dress by Janice Wainwright

“I like small flower prints and this is a very pretty one”. Dress by Bus Stop.

“Very comfortable, I can wear it anywhere”. Jacket and trousers by Coopers.

All images scanned by Miss Peelpants

Duffy (finally)

1960s, amanda lear, book reviews, brian duffy, jean shrimpton, michael sarne, mild sauce, pierre la roche, seventies fashion, the sweet

Queen magazine, 1963

Although you’ll all have long since forgotten that I promised to review the fantastic Duffy book (published by ACC. RRP £45 but currently £31.98 on Amazon.co.uk), I certainly haven’t and it’s been rather weighing on my mind. In fact, I’m troubled by the fact that I rarely seem to have the energy to type long, rambling blog posts at all these days.

So, as I often do, I will largely leave the photographs to do the communicating. Which is rather the point of the book itself. It is not a weighty tome about the life of the man, rather it is a weighty tome about the talent of the man. The talent which made him world-famous, but eventually left him feeling so trapped he had to [pretty much literally] destroy it in order to escape it. Page after page of gorgeous women, swinging dudes of the highest and lowest order and generally Interesting People. But it also covers the later period, the advertising and the selling-out, or ‘prostitution’ as he honestly described it.

I have to admit, I’m always on the look out for new Duffy shoots in my magazines because I’m almost rather bored of seeing the same ones shown again and again. And to be fair, of course, in Duffy’s case there is the genuine problem with the complete lack of original source material. His son Chris has spent years reassembling the archive, and I have to respect the labour of love that this project has become. Thankfully, the book is more varied than the exhibition I attended earlier this year would lead you to believe. I have scanned a few of my personal favourites, which I hope will communicate the beauty of his work.

A pet hate must be noted at this point, which is that these books rarely identify the designer of the clothes worn in the pictures. I know it doesn’t seem like much to a non-clothes obsessive, but I want to know if that dress really was by so-and-so and I find it infuriating for such information to be left out when surely it must be known?

Obviously, luxuriously printed and sized books such as this require the highest calibre of image quality for reproduction purposes, but it would be nice, in a few years time, to see a book which features more obscurities, more magazine tear-sheets and clippings; covering the lesser-known styles and techniques he used. For there are many. I mean, David Bailey has had enough books about him to last a lifetime; Brian Duffy certainly deserves another one.

Definitely one for the Christmas list. And watch out, because I’m going to be reviewing more books to put on your Christmas list over the next few weeks. Yes indeed.

Amanda Lear, 1971

Sweet, 1970

Unidentified, 1960s

Jean Shrimpton, Vogue 1962

Average White Band album cover, 1979

Michael Sarne, 1962

Pirelli, 1965

Pierre La Roche, Aladdin Sane make-up artist, 1973

Alphasud Car, Henley on Thames, 1974

Mike Henry and Nancy Kovack, 1964

Shrimpton Supernova

celia birtwell, Foale and Tuffin, jean muir, jean shrimpton, nova magazine, ossie clark, seventies fashion, thea porter

Dress by Thea Porter

Absolutely breathtaking spread from Nova, December 1970, featuring Jean Shrimpton in some mouth-watering pieces by Ossie Clark, Jean Muir, Foale and Tuffin and Thea Porter.

Photos by Hans Feurer.

Dress by Ossie Clark with print by Celia Birtwell

Blouse by Laura Jamieson at The Sweetshop

Blouse by Jean Muir, gaucho pants by Foale and Tuffin.