A python in her room

1960s, 1970s, Art Kane, Inspirational Images, Margrit Ramme, Queen magazine, thea porter

“You love your boyfriend and he’s left you. You’re alone in a big city and an empty apartment.” Kane had not yet picked up his camera, but Margrit Ramme was working on the sadness. She was also scared of the snake. The editors of Queen magazine had asked for an entire issue to be called “Art Kane’s New York,” including fashions, and he had said all right—but don’t expect to see laughing girls running down Fifth Avenue. He had just divorced his second wife, had not yet met Jean Pagliuso or photographed Larry Rivers, and felt fairly bitter.

If you want to call it Art Kane’s New York, he told Queen, you’ll have to accept pictures showing that the place right now is kind of empty for me. Righto, they said.

He left the studio and rummaged around for real-life locations. He had found the apartment on Gramercy Park, and decided to shoot the fashions there before the furniture came in. Truth is, he wasn’t motivated entirely by a desire to display his mood. Not only does training as an art director make him look for a theme when he has space for an essay, as against a bunch of random shots that just present the merchandise; Art Kane loves almost more than anything else to tell a story.

He also loves snakes. The first boy scout in the Bronx to get a Reptile Study merit badge, he kept 32 of them at home despite a mother who tried to make him flush the first one down the toilet.

This story would reflect the dilemma of a lovely woman—always beautifully dressed, of course—searching for a man, for identity, for something. A snake would be not only an obvious male symbol but also a reminder of a Garden of Eden to start it off. Since Kane had given, his collection to the Bronx Zoo when he was drafted, he called All-Tame Animals, a pro-vider of non-human performers in New York. They referred him to a snake owner in one of the city’s residential hotels, asking that he be discreet; she would be evicted if the manage-ment discovered that she kept a boa constrictor and a python in her room. So Kane was Uncle Joe when he called to ask about Cousin Bea: “She must be a really big girl by now. Oh, six feet six, that sounds good.” And Patricia? “Over eight feet tall? My goodness.” He went over to see them. Their owner showed him the boa in her bathtub and pulled the python out of a closet. “Terrific,” he said. “Bring them up to my place at 10 o’clock tomorrow.”

When she arrived with the snakes in a laundry bag, Kane was moving white window shades up and down, studying the way they filtered the natural light he would use all day. Morning light came softly through the west-facing windows of the living room. He arranged the python, then stood back to peer through a Nikon. Moving forward, back, left, right, he kept the model close to the center of the frame. He was using a 24mm lens, not only for depth of field that would keep the picture sharp from front to back but also to make objects near the edges seem to lean away, focusing attention on the center.

“Okay, Margrit, you’re unhappy, unaware, the two of you can never really come together. . . .” Bracketing—one shot at a normal exposure, one above, one below—he redesigned the picture as he moved. “That’s it, keep it, keep it,” he told her when he liked what was happening. “Now, hold every pose for three clicks and then change … Beautiful. Now keep that until I say stop. I want to explore this until we’ve eaten it up.”

Ninety minutes later he had eaten up the male-female situation (above) and moved to the bedroom (below) to set up an identity problem. A second model had arrived. “You’re clothed and you’re naked,” Kane said, “you’re really the same woman, trying to figure out who you are.” This time he wanted to stretch the image more alarmingly toward the edges, so he put on the 21mm lens that he had used to shock the editors of Vogue on his first fashion assignment.

Images originally published in Queen magazine .

(date not given but looks circa 1969/70 to me, especially given Queen merged with Harpers Bazaar in 1970).

Clothes are uncredited here but both look like Thea Porter to me.

Photographed by Art Kane.

Scanned from Art Kane: The Persuasive Image, 1975.

Love Forty

1960s, Berkertex, Daniel Hechter, Foale and Tuffin, George Malyard, Graham Smith, helmut newton, Inspirational Images, Ken Lane, Malyard, Marlborough, mary quant, Queen magazine, Rayne, Vintage Editorials
White crepe dress by Berkertex. Jewelled snood by Graham Smith.

The clothes of the Thirties were capricious, narcissistic and extravagant — the jazz of the Twenties turning soft, like swing – but with the wartime Forties they necessarily became austere and functional.

To compensate, the details kept their extravagance – shirred waists, sweetheart necks, floppy sleeves, Veronica Lake hair.

On this and the following pages we have a minor Forties revival – minor because these clothes are strictly 1968, when women want to dress both practically and frivolously.

I do not endorse this copy, because I would not agree about the clothes of the Thirties being ‘narcissistic’, but I do endorse the photos and the clothes.

Photographed by Helmut Newton.

Scanned from Queen, July 31st 1968.

Red crepe dress by Foale and Tuffin. Hat by Malyard.
Red wool crepe dress by Foale and Tuffin. Gilt snake bracelets by Ken Lane.
Black crepe dress by Daniel Hechter for Bagatel. Beret by Malyard. Shoes by Rayne.
Grey crepe dress by Harriet.
Black checked beige crepe dress with bloused sleeveless top, by Marlborough. Black beret by Mary Quant for Kangol.

Choli Choli

1960s, Inspirational Images, Queen magazine, Savita, Stephen Bobroff, Vintage Editorials

choli choli 1

The waist is the place to expose for summer 1969. For dancing, for the beach, for anywhere. (But do count calories carefully!) Savita has designed a range of bared-waist outfits to set you dancing endlessly, endlessly. The tops are based on the classic Indian Choli — the small, tight top worn with the sari. Skirts can be short or long — but every time, they’re skirts to swirl and swing and sway.

Photographed by Stephen Bobroff.

Scanned from Queen, June 1969.

choli choli 2

There’s a big round scoop out of the back. Sleeves are below-elbow and tight, border pattern goes round the sleeves, the hem. The fabric is hand-loomed Indian cotton, which is washable and crease-resistant. Both versions cost 50 gns; both at Savita

choli choli 3

Short skirts, bare waists, little tight Choli tops, and fluttering, floating butterfly sleeves. All-over print or border print on handloomed Indian cotton, either costs 25 gns, at Savita, 30 Lowndes Street, SW1.

choli choli 4

choli choli 6

Long skirts to flip flippantly, and the classic tight Choli bodice with tight elbow length Choli sleeves. Handloomed Indian cotton — one in a print of green and blue, the other in green and yellow and red. Both versions, 35 gns, at Savita

choli choli 5

Was Ophelia Pregnant?

1960s, angela gore, Inspirational Images, John Hedgecoe, queen, Queen magazine, Uncategorized

queen - July 68 -john hedgecoe

Queen cover image with model wearing a nightdress by Angela Gore.

Photographed by John Hedgecoe.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, 17th July 1968.

The Present Shape of Christmas

1960s, caroline smith, Queen magazine, Richard Winslade, thea porter

the-present-shape-of-christmas-1

…can be coped with from bed If you have a telephone, a writing hand, and a London address, why walk? Christmas can come to you.

Pretty much my idea of perfection, from the Thea Porter kaftan to the Caroline Smith poster on the wall…

Photographed by Richard Winslade.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, December 1969.

the-present-shape-of-christmas-2

Inspirational Editorials: Two-Way Switch

1960s, annacat, british boutique movement, Browns, Carrot On Wheels, charles jourdan, christian dior, David Anthony, Eric Hart, Fenwick, gerald mccann, Ginger Group, Inspirational Images, kurt geiger, Laura Jamieson, mary quant, McCaul, Queen magazine, ravel, Russell & Bromley, Vintage Editorials

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. Gold link belt by Paris House. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Satin beret by Rudolf.

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. Gold link belt by Paris House. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Satin beret by Rudolf.

Try a touch of seasonal sorcery – swop clothes with yourself instead of with your sister or friend. Mix tweed with satin, sweaters with fur; play addition and subtraction with your wardrobe to achieve subtle solutions for every climate, every occasion and every mood.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, December 1967

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. White blouse by Eric Hart. Tortoiseshell and gilt link belt by Dior. Brown shoes by Kurt Geiger. Brown knitted beret at Fenwick.

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. White blouse by Eric Hart. Tortoiseshell and gilt link belt by Dior. Brown shoes by Kurt Geiger. Brown knitted beret at Fenwick.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Black satin shirt by Eric Hart. Black patent belt by Mary Quant. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Black satin shirt by Eric Hart. Black patent belt by Mary Quant. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Brown and tweed long belted sweater from Browns. Antique Baltic amber beads from Sac Freres. Knitted brown beret at Fenwick. Beige and black ankle boots by Ravel.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Brown and tweed long belted sweater from Browns. Antique Baltic amber beads from Sac Freres. Knitted brown beret at Fenwick. Beige and black ankle boots by Ravel.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar and white satin belt. Diamante drop earrings by Dior. Square diamante handbag by Susan Handbags. White grosgrain strap shoes by Russell and Bromley.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar and white satin belt. Diamante drop earrings by Dior. Square diamante handbag by Susan Handbags. White grosgrain strap shoes by Russell and Bromley.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar. Round-necked chocolate sweater by Laura Jamieson, with long sleeves, buttons down back, and matching ribbed skirt. Tortoiseshell and gilt belt by Dior. Stretch brown leather boots by Kurt Geiger.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar. Round-necked chocolate sweater by Laura Jamieson, with long sleeves, buttons down back, and matching ribbed skirt. Tortoiseshell and gilt belt by Dior. Stretch brown leather boots by Kurt Geiger.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Cream silk shirt by Annacat. Square snakeskin handbag by Russell and Bromley. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Black velvet hair bow by Dior.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Cream silk shirt by Annacat. Square snakeskin handbag by Russell and Bromley. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Black velvet hair bow by Dior.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Beige polo necked sweater by McCaul. Black belt with perspex buckle by Dior. Leather shoes by Charles Jourdan.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Beige polo necked sweater by McCaul. Black belt with perspex buckle by Dior. Leather shoes by Charles Jourdan.

Inspirational Editorials: Pearls. The Why. The where. And the How.

1960s, Adrian Mann, Felicity Bosanquet, hans feurer, Inspirational Images, jewellery, liberty's, marrian mcdonnell, Queen magazine

Bolero of pearly circles, with pearly petals making a brassiere. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, to order from Marian McDonnell, 45 South Molton Street, W1

Bolero of pearly circles, with pearly petals making a brassiere. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, to order from Marian McDonnell, 45 South Molton Street, W1

Coming in, pearls in quantities to make an oyster shrink. But never well-bred strings, Felicity Bosanquet’s idea of wearing pearls is lavish. She loops and circles them into a bolero, a skirt, slings them monster-sized around her waist. Try pearls. They’re good for you. Cleopatra took hers internally, like a Disprin.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, 25th June-8th July 1969

Big pearls make a belt with dangling silvery tassels. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, from Marrian McDonnell. Pearl ropes wound round and round the leg - by Adrian Mann, £125 each, at Liberty's.

Big pearls make a belt with dangling silvery tassels. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, from Marrian McDonnell. Pearl ropes wound round and round the leg – by Adrian Mann, £125 each, at Liberty’s.

Skirted in pearls (You could slip a body-stocking on underneath, if you think it necessary). Swinging big and little circles, separate strings, by Felicity Bosanquet, to order from Marrian McDonnell.

Skirted in pearls (You could slip a body-stocking on underneath, if you think it necessary). Swinging big and little circles, separate strings, by Felicity Bosanquet, to order from Marrian McDonnell.

Mensday: Brian of Brook Street

1960s, Illustrations, Mensday, menswear, Queen magazine, Vintage Adverts

brian of brook street

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, November 1969

Inspirational Images: New Eye Deals

1960s, Bill King, Halston, Inspirational Images, Queen magazine

Rhinestone spectacles and collar are by Halston of New York

Rhinestone spectacles and collar are by Halston of New York

Photographed by Bill King. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, November 1968

Vintage Adverts: Some men go to great lengths to please their women

1960s, 1970s, Inspirational Images, menswear, Queen magazine, Vintage Adverts

impact

Feel free to insert your own nudges, winks and fnar fnars here…

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, March 1970.