Etceteras

1970s, accessories, Adrian Mann, biba, corocraft, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, Olaf Daughters of Sweden, platforms, Russell & Bromley, shoes
Centre: Black and white two tone peeptoe court shoes by Olaf Daughters of Sweden. Beige and brown lace ups and brown court shoes, both by Biba. Brown and tan leather lace ups, tan leather shoes with topstitching and brown leather shoes with buckles, all by Russell and Bromley. Brown leather court shoes with cut-outs and plain leather court shoes, both by Biba.

Brown and cream should be seen. From top to toe it’s all the go!

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, September 1973

Cream suit from Biba. Brown beret by Kangol. Tortoiseshell glasses from Che Guevara. All jewellery from selections at Adrien Mann and Biba.
Tan kid brogues by Russell and Bromley.
Brown crepe dress from Biba. Brown beret by Kangol. Glasses from Che Guevara. Jewellery by Biba, Adrien Mann, Corocraft, Zig Zag and the Neal Street Shop.

They’re a knock-out

1970s, Abecita, bill klein, City Lights, Inspirational Images, janet reger, lingerie, petticoat magazine, platforms, Tommy Roberts, underwear, Vintage Editorials

How does a really cool lady knock spots off the opposition? Sneakily. She discards her vibrant purples and blacks, climbs sweetly into pure white undies and, as innocently as a schoolgirl, demolishes all resistance.

While this editorial can’t quite work out how regressive or feminist it wants to be, I cannot fault the pom-pom platform shoes which are all by City Lights Studio (aka post-Mr Freedom Tommy Roberts and far too short-lived). I would definitely karate chop for those babies.

Photographed by Bill Klein.

Photographed at Pickett’s Lock Recreation Centre.

Scanned from Petticoat, December 1973

Left: Lacy bra and pants by Abecita. Right: Boxer pants and nylon and lycra bra from Marks & Spencer.
Left: Vest and knickers from Marks & Spencer Right: Cami-knickers and bra by Janet Reger.
Left: Boxer pants and vest by Marks & Spencer Right: Bra and pants by Abecita.

The Party Dazzlers

1970s, Alana Collins, Anne Turkel, biba, Blades, bus stop, corocraft, cosmopolitan, Dana Gillespie, Deirdre McSharry, edina ronay, Eva Reuber-Staier, Feathers, Fiona Lewis, Hildebrand, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, just men, mary quant, Nancy Bleier, norman eales, Peter Bubb, Peter Finley, platforms, polly peck, Sally McElvin, sandie shaw, Stephanie McLean, terry de havilland, Vintage Editorials, yves saint laurent
Dana Gillespie, the bosomy (43 in., actually) Mary Magdalene in Jesus Christ Superstar, is the most modest of party girls. At the show’s opening night party she turned up in her old gipsy skirt and a t-shirt, happily flashing her gold and jewelled snake rings. “Sometimes I feel like being outrageous – I just wish there were more parties to entice me out. When I was on my own I went to parties to see more people so I wouldn’t be on my own.” Alone only for the picture, Dana wears her snake collection, backed by a velvet dress and jewelled jacket, designed by her friend Sally McElvin. Pop designer Sally makes one-offs only, from £20.

In the words of Noel Coward, every girl ought to be able to say the morning after, “I’ve been to a mah-vellous party.” A little champagne does not go amiss, but this winter the clothes alone will put a gleam in your eye. There are enough sequins, crystal beads and glittering fabrics to guarantee you are the star attraction. To clinch the deal, I’ve asked some of the most stunning party girls around to give their definition of what constitutes a marvellous party and to put the most dazzling party frocks to the test…

Fashion by Deirdre McSharry.

Photographed by Norman Eales.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, December 1972.

Ann Turkel is the 5ft 10in. tall New Yorker who steals the limelight from the stars at film premieres, so parties are just kid’s stuff. “Parties? That’s when I know no other woman in the room can ‘top me’. I make a real effort – my mother has dresses made up specially in New York and ships them over – I never wear the same dress as any other woman. I know I’m a success when the photographers start crowding me. I like a man who appreciates when you are looking great.” Ann, who likes to move in a cloud of Youth Dew by Estee Lauder, comes on diamond bright in sequins and taffeta. Jacket by Biba £20. Red dress by Mary Quant £12.60.
Eva Reuber-Staier is the ex-Miss World turned TV personality who helped present BBC1’s Animal Stars. She’s cool, poised and gregarious. “I love parties, the kind with pretty girls and clever men. I prefer big parties; there’s more of a choice. I got to at least two parties per week.” The best one she says was given by some Cambidge dons. “Clever, but sexy with it, and could they dance!” Would she make the first move if she fancied a man at a party? “Fortunately I don’t have to.” Cleverly draped, sexy dress by John Bates for Jean Varon £36. Roses by Spectrum. Shoes by Terry de Havilland £13.99. Pop singer Gary Hamilton, star of Hair and several horror films says, “It’s the quiet girls who catch my eye.” Gary in satin trousers by Blades.
Alana Collins is tall, blonde and blue-eyed. “At parties back home in Nacogdoches, Texas, the boys used to call me the Duchess because I love to get dressed up. That was the original one-horse town, but in London I still like to cause a stir. There’s such a variety at parties – long and short hair. I go for the man who is paying total attention to one woman. And if you give him all yours, that clicks.” A lady who watches her strategy. Alana is the perfect Cosmo party girl in pink draped jersey by John Bates for Jean Varon £27. Sheos by Yves Saint Laurent £19.50.
Sandie Shaw sings for her supper. Her husband Jeff Banks, designs for his. United on most fronts, the Banks are divided on parties: “I hate them,” she says. “I love ’em,” he leers. Then they go on remember half a dozen great parties they’ve given including one in a char-a-banc to Southend; another on a river boat and a third at Madame Tussauds. “My idea of a good party is mostly fellas,” says Sandie, “but I don’t like him to look posh. The thing is, he loves me dressed up.” Dolled up for “that great party no one ever seems to give,” as Jeff says, is Sandie in a Banks special, suitably glittery in green and gold gauze. Sandie’s hair by Smiles. Jeff’s clothes by Blades.
Nancy Bleier, a bouncing brunette model import from Milwaukee, prefers her parties on the small size. “Just a few intimate friends, a quite dinner and dancing at Tramp or Annabel’s,” says Nancy who keeps her party figure by taking modern dance lessons. Nancy makes her eyes up like Sophia Loren, wears a lot of scent and generally sticks to trousers at parties. “My French boyfriend says: ‘Darling why don’t you ever wear a dress?’ He offered to buy me one – but never did.” Not downcast, Nancy dresses up for Swiss model Reto in a 1000 watt lime glitter outfit from Biba, top £14, skirt £15.25. Reto’s dinner suit from Just Men, £45.
Edina Ronay, the actress and model says: “A good party is when Warren Beatty murmers ‘call me tomorrow’. Actually the best parties are the ones I give myself – straight and freaky, champagne and – uh – cakes. The people look at each other and enjoy the difference. What happens afterwards – that’s what counts about parties.” Edina, who had her hair hennaed in Morocco, gets ready for her Christmas party in crushed pink velvet and feathers. Dress by Biba £15, boa and ‘diamond’ ring by Bus Stop, £6.50 and £1.95. Robert wears sequined jacket by Dior and ruffled shirt by Just Men.
Stephanie McLean, at 5ft 10in., is the kind of status blonde most men hope to meet at parties. And it was at a party where her husband, a photographer who specialises in nudes, met her. Says Stephanie, “Now when we go to parties we separate – otherwise why bother to go out at all? – but I keep my eye on him. I prefer relaxed, informal parties and almost always wear jeans. Sometimes I get dressed up and he says ‘you look fantatic, we’ll go out.'” Looking dressed up in a glittery silver and black taffeta dress by Polly Peck £12.85. Peter Finley the model who prefers parties for two, wears black satin trousers from Blades.
Film actress Fiona Lewis has the sophisticated face of the Seventies, so it’s not surprising that her idea of a party is simple – and expensive. “Lots of drinks and lots of people, never punch which is a bore and bad for your digestion. Simple things like smoked salmon and chilled white wine are best. And I prefer to wear fantasy clothes which I run up myself from scarves. I ask dishy men and tell them to bring their friends.” Fiona adds her own glitter to a black and white taffeta halter dress, Hildebrand about £18.50 and also a floating red chiffon dress aove right, at Feathers £25. Peter Bubb the model wears velvet dinner jacket by Just Men £35.

The Girls in the Band: A New Look for Cabaret

1970s, biba, Dolcis, hans feurer, Inspirational Images, platforms, sunday times magazine
The Moodies – a group of art students who started the parody the current obsession with nostalgia, then found themselves being taken seriously

The numbers that The Moodies perform are firmly anchored in the Fifties and Sixties and ignore the current pop obsessions for necrophilia, drugs, suicide and the like. But under their bizarre make-up they are entertainers of the Seventies, rather than a group of decadent kids living off the nostalgia for ‘golden oldies’. On a good night, when the audience is firmly on their side, they create an atmosphere more like that of a private party than a sterile public performance; they earn their laughs through the juxtaposition of songs, their eccentric make-up, their idiotic props and their energetic dancing.

About a month ago, when they were playing at the tiny Moderna Theatre in Munich’s Schwabing district (surely the cleanest ‘quarter’ in the world), we noticed that the audience of all ages, shapes and sizes, were neatly dressed to the last man and woman; even their jeans had the knife-edge creases of an expensive boutique — the complete opposite of the people they had come to watch, who were described recently in Time Out as “looking like half a dozen friendly whores after a hard night in the Reeperbahn”.

“Everyone here tries to get us to mend our sweaters, they feel sorry for us. They think a hole is a sign of poverty. They wear the gear but they don’t understand what it’s about.

Perhaps that’s why we appeal to them,” said Anne Bean, who is a deceptively homely-looking girl off-stage and a powerhouse of energy on. She is one of the leaders of the group, though she denied that anyone actually led : “We are totally democratic -not that there is such a thing.” All art students at Reading, it was the second time they had played Munich. They banded together to play professional dates after they had sat their finals; they all passed except for buxom Suzy Adderley, who is on one year’s leave of absence and goes back soon to complete her course. They tried their luck at the Edinburgh Festival along with the rest of the Fringe: this was successful enough to land them their first book-ing in Munich.

“Actually, we were offered an Arts Council grant but we turned it down as we thought that it might restrict us,” said Rod Melvin, the pianist and the only man in the group. They still don’t have a pro-ducer, director, manager or agent. The only non-performing person to travel with them is Mickey Ekers who is a stage-manager-cum-electrician-cum-prop-master.

In the early days there were six girls, Anne Bean, Marianne Holliday, Polly Eltes, Suzy Adderley, Annie Sloan and Becky Bailey, but Becky Bailey deserted the group to paint. Anne Bean explained: “We really did the show as part of our finals.” Did this help them pass ? “Quite the contrary. It nearly sank us.”

At the start they followed the traditions of what was happening in pop music at that time: “Even the names we chose were just send-ups of those currently fashionable girlie groups like Lulu and the Luvvers and Martha and the Vandellas” said Anne Bean. “At one time we called ourselves Frank and the Furters” (she looked suitably ashamed) “then Lulu and the Lesbians, then prior to becoming The Mooches we were The Menstrual Seven.”

Before returning to Munich they had been playing at the Theatre at New End, Hampstead, where they had become quite a cult with late-night audiences. The group do num-bers like Gingold’s and Chevalier’s duet Ah Yes, I Remember It Well from Gigi and some of the more aggressive Presley songs, but they interpret these rather than imitate the originals. They make no announcements and use no words in spite of ‘gag fur gag’ written on the pink stars advertising the show. And they are very funny. Thank You For Being An Angel sung with melancholic grace by Rod Melvin became farce as the angel who drifted around stage shedding sequins at every step turned out to be a cross between Mae West and Jayne Mansfield. (Melvin is a talented pianist; the rest of the group are not musicians, but rely instead on improvisation and innovation.)

The make-up is startling. Polly Eltes said: “I really don’t quite know how we arrived at this present look. We started off quite simply looking brown and rather natural with perhaps blue eyelids, but gradually we progressed to what you see now.” They wear water-based wet-white foundation and then draw their features on to these masks. Anne Bean takes it the furthest by banding strips of coloured feathers to her eyebrows, while Rod Melvin, with his great carmine mouth and black sad eyes, looks somewhere between a clown and a Kabuki artist.

“I suppose we do reflect fashions, but I think it’s quite unconscious,” said Annie Sloan. “When Germaine Greer’s book came out (The Female Eunuch) we all wore strict little mannish suits, but somehow we have come to this.” ‘This’ is fishnet tights (with holes), gold-painted lace-up boots, long gloves and clothes they say they make themselves (which no-one would challenge). During the performance they swap clothes so that they look different but don’t use more costumes.

“I suppose that what we wear might seem eccentric and exaggerated; everyone marvels at Rod’s shoes but they came from Dolcis and mine came from Biba’s, so we are only picking up what’s around.” They admit that their art training and observations have probably influenced their act — the masks they wear at one point are exactly like those shown on some of John Davies’s sculptures shown at the Whitechapel Gallery a couple of years ago : “But we don’t want to intellectualise what we do,” said Annie Sloan, “or we might become self-conscious and unable to perform.”

The group pool their money; so much goes on running expenses, the rest on food and necessities. They were scheduled for seven more weeks on the road, ending at the Schiller Theatre in East Berlin. “When we are out of work we all do other things. I model, though I’m not much good at it,” said Polly Ekes. “I can’t really take it seriously, so when I go for jobs I mostly get turned down.” Rod and Anne teach, and sometimes Rod plays the piano for a girl singer and Marianne does typography and pho-tography. It is doubtful whether they will stick together : one has the feeling that they are enthusiastically filling in time before they move on to some-thing else.

Photographed by Hans Feurer. Report by Meriel McCooey.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, June 23rd 1974

All Things Bright and Beautiful

1970s, Bata, Brian Downes, Honey Magazine, platforms, Russell & Bromley, Sacha, Sacha, shoes

all things bright and beautiful small

L-R Vampy wedge heeled shoes by Sacha, Skinny lemon boots by Russell & Bromley, Co-respondent leather running shoes by Sacha, Stripy suede boots with crepe soles by Sacha, Double stripe soft leather boots by Sacha, Tough crepe soled lace-ups by Bata, Skinny leather platform soled boots by Sacha. Cork soled suede lace ups by Sacha.

Photographed by Brian Downes.

Scanned from Honey magazine, November 1971.

Rings and Things

1970s, accessories, Alan Cracknell, biba, Dolcis, Illustrations, miss selfridge, petticoat magazine, platforms, ravel, shoes, van der fransen, way in

rings and things

Illustration by Alan Cracknell.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, December 1970.

They think we’re just good friends…

1970s, cosmopolitan, Inspirational Images, platforms, smirnoff, Vintage Adverts

smirnoff - cosmo - november 73

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, November 1973

What a catch!

19 magazine, 1970s, biba, duc, Inspirational Images, platforms, Russell & Bromley, Sacha, shoes, Vintage Editorials

what-a-catch-2

Lace-up leather shoes by Sacha

We threw in the line and fished out some of the best and most original shoes that are in the shops this spring. It may not be an ideal catch for a real angler, but then it depends what you’re fishing for, doesn’t it?

Photographed by Duc.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, April 1972.

what-a-catch-1

Baseball boot by Biba. Red leather with peeptoe by Sacha, Navy and white corresponding lace-up by Russell & Bromley, Vivid China blue peeptoe slingback by Sacha, Red leather peeptoe and green and yellow on front by Sacha, Navy blue peeptoe with ruched panel by Sacha, Red leather embossed with yellow spots by Sacha.

Inspirational Images: Hollywood Revamped

1970s, british boutique movement, christopher mcdonnell, cosmopolitan, George Malyard, Inspirational Images, kari ann muller, marrian mcdonnell, platforms, richard imrie, terry de havilland

Terry de Havilland Christopher McDonnell Cosmopolitan May 1972 Richard Imrie

Christopher McDonnell must dream in black and white, and all his dreams must star Ginger Rogers and Rita Hayworth. Because, when it comes to designing clothes, this twenty-eight year old ex-Royal College of Art designer is the very spirit of Hollywood: his clothes have backless bodices, necklines to the navel and skirts that grip the bottom and then flare in Busby Berkley pleats. His model girls, smiling jammily through their bright lips, false eyelashes and heaving curls, snap along on platform soles. One of today’s top stars, Anouk Aimée, is his favourite customer. Here, model Kari-Ann wears black taffeta top and pleated dotted culottes by Christopher McDonnell, £35. Hat by George Malyard. Shoes by Terry de Havilland, exclusive to Marrian McDonnell.

Photographed by Richard Imrie.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, May 1972.

Inspirational Editorials: By Royal Command for Public Demand

1970s, barbara hulanicki, biba, Bob Richardson, british boutique movement, Inspirational Images, platforms, Vintage Editorials

biba bob richardson 19 magazine may 72 1

The Duchess of Windsor has been the epitome of elegance for thousands of people, as she manages to combine originality and chic in such a feminine way. With her faultless dress sense in mind, Barbara Hulanicki of Biba designed some of these outfits exclusively for 19, keeping the theme black and white as that most associated with the elegance of the ‘Thirties. We take you back, in affectionate nostalgia, to the days of tea at the Ritz, when immaculately dressed ladies and gentlemen listened to a string orchestra, while nibbling cucmber sandwiches and sipping China tea.

Photographed by Bob Richardson. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, May 1972.

biba bob richardson 19 magazine may 72 2

biba bob richardson 19 magazine may 72 3

biba bob richardson 19 magazine may 72 4