Indoor Fireworks

1970s, biba, charles jourdan, cherry twiss, Chic of Hampstead, Inspirational Images, janet reger, Lucienne Phillips, ossie clark, quorum, Sam Haskins, Sheilagh Browne, telegraph magazine, The Sunday Telegraph Magazine, thea porter, Vintage Editorials, Yuki, yves saint laurent, zandra rhodes
Sparkling black chiffon dress with plunging neckline and diamante embroidery, £250 from Thea Porter, 8 Greek Street, London W1

Japanese men are peculiarly affected by a glimpse of the naked nape of a Japanese neck. In Western cultures such excitement is generated by a panorama of bosom (as in this black chiffon dress by Thea Porter), or a smooth swathe of thigh. Here we show some revelations from the London autumn collections… hot numbers for the coolest of winter evenings.

All perfect for lockdowns, I’m sure you’ll agree! It’s also nice to be surprised by Ossie Clark every once in a while – with a corset being so vastly different in tone from what we would usually expect.

Photographed by Sam Haskins.

Fashion Editor: Cherry Twiss.

Hair by Paulene at Michaeljohn.

Scanned from The Telegraph Magazine, 8th November 1974.

Cream and brown two piece with lace split skirt and boned top by Ossie Clark. Shoes by Charles Jourdan, 47/49 Brompton Road, SW3
Slate blue dress by Yuki. Approximately £,165 from Fortnum and Mason, Chic of Hampstead, Heath Street, London NW3 or Lucienne’s, 89 Knightsbridge, London SW1. Gold and jade bangles from Jones, 52 Beauchamp Place, London SW3.
White silk chiffon and net full skirt and sheer top by Zandra Rhodes, to order from Fortnum and Mason.
Black jersey skirt with split front by Yuki obtainable from Fortnum and Mason or Chic of Hampstead. Sheer silk chiffon halter top by Sheilagh Browne, £14 from Quorum. Black suspender belt from Janet Reger, Bottom Drawer, 33 Southwick Street, London W2. Black stockings from Biba, Kensington High Street, W8. Shoes from Yves St Laurent, 113 New Bond Street, W1 .
Corset and skirt by Ossie Clark (as before)

You’ll be tickled pink

1970s, art deco, biba, cosmopolitan, interior design, Vintage Adverts

Two things I will never fail to be tickled by are 1. The far-reaching influence of Biba Deco on Seventies style, up to and including the era of Punk and New Wave and 2. The fact that there was a National Dairy Council who would spend time and money making milk look sexy and elegant. Delicious!

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, February 1979.

How we gave Linda a new lovely look

1970s, beauty, beauty tips, Chris Holland, Estee Lauder, Hair and make-up, Linda Hayden, Make-up, Max Factor, petticoat magazine, way in

This is Linda Hayden, seventeen year old actress and friend of Richard Harris. Of her he’s said, “She looks absolutely lovely, she’s a wonderful girl.” Linda doesn’t altogether agree with him. She doesn’t think she looks absolutely lovely because she says her cheeks are too podgy. She is very partial to lager and lime, Cornish cream, butter and crusty fresh bread : But when she is working on a film like Baby Love or her latest, Satan’s Skin, her weight just falls off. Still, normally it’s a great battle to keep to her ideal seven and a half stone. When we met Linda, she told us that she had two ambitions: 1. To stop being cast as a nymphet in horror films. 2. To learn how to shade her face so it always looked slim. Linda has very little time to learn about makeup. When she was fifteen she starred in Baby Love, but was not allowed to go and see it. After that she had a series of sexy parts in Hammer films like Taste the Blood of Dracula. In her latest film with Charles Hanson and Piers Haggard there are all sorts of evil doings, Linda told us, “Hardly a moment went by without someone being impaled on a pitchfork, raped, or stabbed with shears in the back. I cut my foot to ribbons with the end of the fork first time I had to do it and was rushed off for a tetanus injection.” Linda, who lives at home with her parents and sister goes off food for about a week when she wants to look really super. She just lives on cheese and coffee. This way she can lose five pounds without trying. She was vague about future plans. She is in no rush to do another film and laughed at any idea of marriage. Richard Harris’s former wife, Elizabeth, and Rex Harrison are inseparable but Richard is cagey about marrying again and says, “Even Helen of Troy couldn’t drag me to the altar anyway Linda is too young and ambitious and I am too old and ambitious. I am going on forty!” With the help of a makeup artist from Eyelure, we show in step by step pictures how the skilful use of makeup can alter Linda’s (and your) features.

Shot 1—no makeup. Shot 2—Max Factor Pancake 085 was smoothed in with a dampened sponge to give an even base. Shot 3—Linda’s eyebrows were brushed upwards and outwards with a dampened mascara brush to give them a better shape. Foundation was blended well into the eyelids and then a light dusting of face powder was added with the sponge, to give a non-greasy finish. White Shadow Pearl used with water and stroked on gently with a brush, was used to highlight immediately under the eyebrow. Then Smokey Grey shadow used with water and carefully applied with a brush was used all over the lid, and brought round under the eye. A little white shadow pearl at the very roots of the eyelash made the eye appear more blended in. Top lashes were mascaraed from underneath with Max Factor’s black mascara. Finally feather light strokes of soft brown pencil were used to shape the brows. The lashes used were very natural– Eylure’s See Through Lash No. I in brown. They were put on carefully with tweezers, starting in the middle, then pressed gently into place. Next the bottom lashes were mascaraed from above. Black Short Trim Underlashes were used because bottom lashes tend to look lighter. These were also applied with tweezers. Shot 4—Shading was done with brushes for best effect. Eylure do twelve brushes for £6.6s. Using the Eylure Face Shaper Kit, the makeup artist put white highlighter on the cheekbone and plenty of brown shaker in the hollow of the cheek. This was done with upswept brush strokes and blended in so that it didn’t look just like a dirty smudge. Then more highlight was used under the shaper to bring out the lower jaw and finally dark shaper again was used along the jawline and underneath to give the chin more definition. Shot 5—A delicate tinge of blusher was blended in just below the cheekbone. With some good brushwork Linda’s cheekbones were re-discovered. Shot 6.—The final look with Estee Lauder’s lipstick Walnut, glossed up with vaseline.

Beauty by Ann Morrow.

Tunic top with hood from Way-In.

Photographed by Chris Holland.

Scanned from Petticoat, 23rd January 1971.

A Clutch of Bags

1970s, alistair cowin, Angela at London Town, bags, biba, caroline smith, Elle, flair magazine, gordon king, Herbert Johnson, Illustrations, Pierre Elegante, Sujon, Titfers
From left to right: Black satin Oxford bags, Angela at London Town £5; black satin clutch bag with rhinestone star, Titfers £8. Orange and red blanket check pure wool bags with turn ups, Pierre Elegante £8; yellow felt clutch bag with navy satin trim and flower button, Titfers £4. Wool gaberdine rust Oxford bags with winged pockets and turn ups, Gordon King £7.50; navy felt clutch bag with white anchor and white satin trim, Titfers £4; cotton kerchief square 40p, Herbert Johnson. Rust two toned patterned wool tweed trousers with turn ups, Biba £5.50; Black suede clutch bag with rust suede trim, Biba £7.75. Red acrylic wool Oxford bags, Alistair Cowin £6.50; black blue and beige chevron felt clutch bag, Titfers, £4.20. Rust brown and ochre checked wool tweed bags with turn ups, Sujon £9.50; golden suede clutch bag with tortoiseshell flap, Elle £12.50.

This autumn there are bags everywhere: Oxford ones on your pins and clutch ones in the hand. The return of the straight trouser has brought with it wing lapelled jackets with padded shoulders and neat waistcoats. Underneath, a feminine touch to soften the butch look, blouses with floppy painters’ bows. And don’t forget your clutch bag tucked neatly under your arm.

Illustration by Caroline Smith.

Scanned from Flair, November 1971.

Blue Baloo

1970s, barry lategan, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, leonard, Make-up, pablo and delia, Revlon, Sue Baloo, Vogue
Model Sue Baloo, brightly glowing with Revlon’s Ultima 11 Dresden Peach Cream Foam smoothed over her face and neck, then dusted lightly with Transluscent Face Powder – her cheeks learning the blues in Lapis Blue eyeshadow from the new Silk Print Eye Collection, blending into its compact partner, Sari Pink on the eyelids with Carbon Blue Lash Makeup Automatic intensifying her grey eyes. Blue Baloo’s lips are smiling in Rich Rich Russet – a stunningly clear bright red from the Couture Lip Collection; her hair is drawn back by Oliver at Leonard under a leather, feather and wooden bead belt wound around her head of brilliant blue and yellow ochre with medallions painted in powder blue, by Pablo & Delia.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, February 1971.

Christmas Glitter

19 magazine, 1970s, Antiquarius, biba, bus stop, Chelsea Antiques Market, Christian Larroque, Crochetta, erica budd, Essences, Essenses, Inspirational Images, John Craig, kangol, lee bender, Leicester Shoes, marshall lester, mushroom, platforms, Richard Green, Sacha, universal witness, Vintage Editorials
Hats on both models by Kangol. Sequins stuck on by hand. Knitted silver lurex halterneck top by Erica Budd. Fox fur cape from Essences at Antiquarius. Black leather gloves by F. G. Shave. Knitted silver lurex wrap over cardigan by Erica Budd. Fox muffler as before. Black leather gloves from Moss Bros. Black and glass beaded pendant necklace from a selection at Marie Middleton at Chelsea Antique Market.

Black and silver are this year’s popular Christmas colours. Sweaters are in silver lurex striped in black, black wool flecked with silver and endless other combinations. Shapes are halter-necks, dolmans, or little wrap-over cardigans – almost any shape will do. Accessories are bright and glittery. Add touches, like sticking sequins on your hats, and shoes, and you’re all set to outshine the fairylights.

Photographed by Christian Laroque.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1972.

What a year. It’s hard to summon up a great deal of enthusiasm for the Christmas we’re about to have, but I’m looking backwards to look forwards, as I often do. I still seem to find joy and solace in art and aesthetics and I hope my posts have given you the odd moment of enjoyment and inspiration this year. Thank you for your support and to everyone who has bought vintage from me or liked/shared/commented on my blog and Instagram posts. Sending you my love and best wishes for a better year ahead.

Hats on both models by Kangol. Sequins stuck on by hand. Wool halterneck sweater with thin silver lurex stripes by John Craig. Black satin skirt from Bus Stop. Fox fur muffler from a seletion at Essences at Antiquarius. Black leather gloves by F. G. Shave. Silver lurex sweater with thin black stripes by Marshall London. Fox fur muffler as before. Black leather gloves from Moss Bros. Christmas decorations from Woolworths.
Hats on both models by Kangol. Sequins stuck on by hand. Lurex cardigan with long sleeves from Biba. Long black satin skirt from Bus Stop. Fox fur muffler from a seletion at Essences at Antiquarius. Black leather gloves by F. G. Shave. Black and silver lurex striped sweater from Biba. Black satin Oxford bags by Richard Green. Black suede shoes with silver snakeskin trim by Leicester shoes. Fox muffler as before. Black leather gloves from Moss Bros. Necklace from a selection at Marie Middleton at Chelsea Antique Market.
Hats on both models by Kangol. Sequins stuck on by hand. Green wool lurex flecked sweater from Universal Witness. Black satin skirt by Mushroom. Black suede shoes with silver snakeskin trim by Leicester shoes. Black leather gloves from Moss Bros. Glass and amber dress clip from a selection at Marie Middleton at Chelsea Antique Market. Charcoal grey lurex sweater with heart-shaped neck and lurex trims by John Craig. Black satin skirt from Bus Stop. Fox fur muffler from a seletion at Essences at Antiquarius. Black leather gloves by F. G. Shave.
Hats on both models by Kangol. Sequins stuck on by hand. Black, gold and silver striped lurex sweater by Crochetta. Black satin skirt by Mushroom. Black suede shoes with silver snakeskin trim by Leicester shoes. Long yellow chiffon scarf from a selection at Essences. Black leather gloves by F. G. Shave. Necklace from a selection at Marie Middleton at Chelsea Antique Market. Black angora halterneck sweater, striped with silver lurex, by Crochetta. Black sequin jacket from Essences at Antiquarius. Black satin skirt from Bus Stop. Gold shoes from Sacha. Black leather gloves from Moss Bros.

The World’s Most Beautiful Lingerie

1970s, Bob Carlos Clarke, janet reger, lingerie, underwear, Vintage Adverts, Vogue

Photographed by Bob Carlos Clarke.

Scanned from Vogue, December 1978.

Flat Power

1970s, Barbara Carrera, cosmopolitan, Elyse Lewin, interior design, interiors

You might be short on space, but that’s no reason to skimp on imagination in doing up your own place. “Studio flat, one bed, kitchen and bath, ch, pleasant aspect.” That’s the kind of accommodation most of us want when we look for somewhere to live in the big city. And the metal windows, featureless walls and skimpy dimensions are liable to be standard whether you call it a flat and you’re in London, or Liverpool, or it’s pronounced “apartment” and the address is Beverly Hills, Los Angeles. Case in point is the one-bedroom pad, shown on these pages, of Barbara Carrera, Nicaraguan-born model and actress. The plethora of ruffled pillows, jungle of greenery and vast coffee table indicates the Hollywood influence, but you don’t need to be Liz Taylor to aspire to mirror tiles on your wall to expand a poky bedroom. The Californian passion for pale colours, low sofas and casual arrangements of objects suits the English climate, too. Wicker mania is also rampant here in the UK, hence the boom in shops that sell basketware of every kind. Barbara must have bought a job lot of laundry baskets which she mounted in two tiers. These now hold her TV set, record player, art books and some of the jungle greenery. The mirror walls make the basket shelves look double the amount, but the initial investment in six strong cane baskets is a fraction of shelving bought by the yard. Bonus: you can take the baskets with you when you decide to move elsewhere.

Barbara is celebrating her first part in a film—she plays Victoria in Embryo opposite Rock Hudson—hence the purchase of the wall-hanging “TAKE ME TO YOUR LEDA” seen over her bed. But if, like Barbara, you can handle a paint brush, why not splash out your own abstract art like Barbara’s picture hanging over the sofa ? Most working girls don’t have the space for a dining area. Barbara gives intimate dinners—never more than four—in the corner of her living-room where two peacock chairs flank a small round table. Make one yourself from a round plywood top balanced on a metal plinth finished off with fabric skirt.

The all-over printed batiks have the freshest look in printed fabrics with the correct ethnic feeling. Models like Barbara who jet round the world can pick up Indonesian sarongs, embroidered Greek cushions and Navaho rugs in the Country of origin at airport shops as well as in the authentic souks and bazaars. Happily, anyone with a day ticket can find the same merchandise in the clutch of ethnic shops in Pimlico, Covent Garden and Hampstead. Beautiful kangas, batiks, or baskets, shells. Oriental china and wall-hangings can be seen at one of the newest sources, Rain (late Klong and Roots and Shoots), Pimlico Road, London SW1. A wind-bell to tinkle at the window and a dozen or so green plants (don’t forget a decorative watering-can and plant mister are available at Conran, Draycott Avenue, SW3, which also stocks handsome cane furniture) will complete your private Oriental fantasy. We can’t all be movie stars, but we can all afford some of the comforts of Hollywood.

Photographed by Elyse Lewin.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1976.

The night before

1970s, cosmopolitan, lingerie, loungewear, miss selfridge, Vintage Adverts
Looking great, feeling fine. In soft, silky nightdresses exclusive to Miss Selfridge.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, November 1974.

The Great Imposters

1970s, anello and davide, aquascutum, Beged'Or, Bermona, Borg, caroline baker, chelsea cobbler, Dada, Feathers, Herbert Johnson, jane whiteside, Jonvelle, kensington market, kurt geiger, laura ashley, Laura Jamieson, Lizzie Carr, Martha Hill, Mexicana, Mog, Morel, nova magazine, peter robinson, Russell & Bromley, Selfridges, stirling cooper, the souk, The Sweet Shop, velmar, Vintage Editorials, Wild Mustang Co.
Tissavel-lined Galaxy coat by Beged’Or approx. £50; cotton blouse by Mexicana, £13; fur fabric jeans by Newmans, 12 gns; hairy slipper boots at Russell & Bromley, £6 19s; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s; hatband made from an Estonian tie at the Russian Shop, 7s 6d; fur bag at The Souk, £3 5s; wool gloves at Dickins & Jones, 10s:

Leather and fur get more expensive every year. It’s not only the taxes and rising costs of production. It’s just that there aren’t enough good animal skins for leather around to meet the consumer demand. Furs are there in quantity for the fabulously rich. Luckily a good substitute has been found – the nylon-spun, man-made sort. Some, especially in the leather field, are so like the real thing the only way you can tell the difference is by the smell. Take the white coat on pages 46 and 47. It’s fake and costs about £50. It has a double in real fur and leather for £270. Made by the same people who have duplicated most of their collection this way and it takes an eagle eye and nose to tell the difference. Others are just furry, woolly fabrics, obviously not imitating some four-legged friend, which is one of the nicest things about them. This fur fabric is now getting the treatment it deserves. Nairn Williamson (more famous for their Vinyl floor and wall coverings) were the first to see its potential and got six designers to use their Velmar fur fabric in their winter collections. Jane Whiteside for Stirling Cooper (new label getting famous fast for their beautiful jersey co-ordinates) was the cleverest of them all. She used the best sludgy colours, mixed it with needlecord to make a group of jackets and coats to go with trousers, skirts and blouses. Borg (American originated and the pioneers in England of this deep pile fabric) has been around for a long time, mostly on the inside of duffle and raincoats but it’s on the outside as a normal fabric that it looks its best. Next winter there will be a lot more of it around, now that designers are getting less snobby about plastics. Not only is it as warm as fur, it is, of course, much cheaper and you don’t smell like a wet dog when you come in from the rain, either. So you can wear it herding sheep on lost weekends, or in town queuing for the cinema without any guilt feelings about ruining your assets.

Insert obligatory ‘I don’t agree with the thrust of the argument for fake furs as just a financial consideration here’ caveat from me, your content provider. Don’t shout at me, basically. But it’s an interesting insight into the mindset of 1970, and the proliferation of fake furs and skins at that time. It’s also a breathtakingly styled and photographed work of art from Caroline Baker and Jonvelle.

Fashion by Caroline Baker.

Photographed by Jonvelle.

Scanned from Nova, January 1970.

Mediaeval velvet applique dress by Laura Jamieson at The Sweetshop, 20 gns; Tissavel and Galaxy waistcoat by Beged’Or, £22.
Velmar jacket and needlecord trousers by Stirling Cooper, £8 10s., £5 1Gs; leggings by Chelsea Cobbler, to order, 10 gns; cotton shirt from selection at Dada, Kensington Antique Market from 2 gns.
Acrilan jacket by Lizzie Carr approx. 24 gns; suede trousers by Morel, 17 gns, tied with leather strips from John Lewis Haberdashery Dept, 1s 10d per yard; wellingtons at Russell and Bromley, £3 19s; woven sash wrapped around neck at Herbert Johnson, 25s; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s; wool gloves at Selfridges, &s 11d
Velmar and Courtelle trousers by Martha Hill, approx. 8 gns; poncho at Peter Robinson, £7; wool shirt by Stirling Cooper, £4 5s; studded wristlet by Knees at Kensington Antique Market, 1 gn; suede moccasin boots by Anello & Davide, £8 15s; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s; sheepskin rug from The Souk from £3 19s 6d to £6; flask from Kensington Antique Market.
Velmar fur fabric floor length coat trimmed with canvas by Mog, £20, over long cotton nightgown by Laura Ashley, £5; knitted wool socks at Feathers, £1 1s 6d
Velmar coat with needlecord and zipper trims (top left) by Stirling Cooper, 18 gns; pale suede and leather lace-up boots by Kurt Geiger, 35 gns; wool gloves at Selfridges, 8s 11d; leather belt by The Wild Mustang Manufacturing Co., approx. £3 12s 6d; fur shepherdess hat, bag and drinking flask from a selection at Kensington Antique Market
Velmar jacket and needlecord trousers (top right) by Stirling Cooper, £12 19s 6d, £5 10s; big polo-neck ribbed Shetland wool sweater at Aquascutum, £6 15s; corrugated leather lace-up boots at Russell and Bromley, £29 19s; knitted Aran mitts at Selfridges, 16s 11d; velour hat by Bermona, £3 11s, furry bag from a selection at Kensington Antique Market.