Easy Does It

19 magazine, 1970s, Anne Cossins, Donald Davies, erica budd, Inspirational Images, John Bishop, John Dove and Molly White, knitwear, Laura Jamieson, mr freedom, The Sweet Shop, Vintage Editorials
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Sweater and matching knickerbockers hand-knitted by Molly Dove.

Knitted tops for all occasions. Warm, comfortable sweaters with amusing motifs from The Sweet Shop, and samples from an imaginative collection by a new designer, Molly Dove. Her clothes are obtainable by mail order only; which, as well as keeping the prices down, makes them available to more of you! We also show a pretty little halter-necked top that’s barely there, just in case the sun comes out!

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, January 1971.

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Canary yellow jumper by Eric Budd.

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Animal motif sweaters from The Sweet Shop.

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Knitted halter neck by Erica Budd.

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Piano key sweater by Anne Cossins for Mr Freedom.

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Random knit playsuit by Zeekit by Crochetta. Hand-knitted striped stockings from Women’s Home Industries.

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Bahamas and Birds sweaters both by Molly Dove.

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Sweater by Erica Budd. Bermudas by Donald Davies. Striped stockings by Women’s Home Industies.

Madeline Smith (twice)

1970s, Hair and make-up, Madeleine Smith, Vintage Adverts

Not one, but two Madeline Smith modelling jobs in one copy of 19 Magazine. What a beauty!

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, September 1969.

Kind of Casual

19 magazine, 1970s, Bermona, biba, Chelsea Antiques Market, Inspirational Images, Maude, stirling cooper, Uncategorized
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Hat by Bermona. Check coat with high collar and raised shoulders by Stirling Cooper. Black crepe skirt from Biba. Pin from Susan Marsh at Chelsea Antiques Market.

Photographed by Maude.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, October 1972.

Mr Freedom

19 magazine, 1960s, glam rock, Inspirational Images, mr freedom, Stuart Brown, Tommy Roberts, Vintage Editorials
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Navy blue t-shirt in cotton with dynamic POW stitched front by Mr Freedom, £4.

Photographed by Stuart Brown.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1969.

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Black cotton t-shirt with a satin ZAP stitched on the front by Mr Freedom, £4. Green satin trousers by Ossie Clark for Quorum, approx 5 1/2 gns.

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T-shirts by Mr Freedom. Shorts by Jack Hobbs.

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All by Jack Hobbs.

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Bright red t-shirt overprinted with Tarzan riding a lion by Mr Freedom, 27s 6d. Green satin trousers by Ossie Clark for Quorum, approx 5 1/2 gns.

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Printed cotton Superman t-shirt by Mr Freedom. Shorts by Jack Hobbs.

The Corocraft Necklace

19 magazine, 1970s, corocraft, Inspirational Images, Vintage Adverts
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One piece from our Irmela collection of jewellery for your neck, your hands, your wrists, your waist, your ears and your breasts.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, October 1970.

Face Up To The Party

19 magazine, 1960s, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Make-up, pre-raphaelite, Stephen Bobroff

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Photographed by Stephen Bobroff.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1969.

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A Quick Step to Lovely Legs (& Co)

19 magazine, 1970s, flick colby, Gill Clarke, legs and co, Lulu Cartwright, pan's people, Pan's People and spin-offs, Patti Hammond, Pauline Peters, Rosie Hetherington, Sue Menhenick, Uncategorized, Vintage Adverts

Legs and Co

For the uninitiated (and, if so, how? Why?.. Please acquaint yourself with some of my favourite performances below.) Legs & Co were a dance troupe on the BBC’s Top of the Pops from 1976-1981. They followed on from the short-lived Ruby Flipper, and also from the legendary Pan’s People. Formed and choreographed by original Pan’s Person Flick Colby, Sue Menhenick (seen here second from the right) was the only member of all three troupes.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, September 1978.

The Grand Affair

19 magazine, 1970s, antony price, art deco, biba, clobber, David Tack, Inspirational Images, interiors, jeff banks, ossie clark, radley, Sidgreene, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials

Grand affairs call for grand clothes, and provide a welcome opportunity to get out of our peasant blouses and jeans and dress accordingly. The nicest thing about fashion at the moment is that everyone is so confused as to what they should be wearing, that you can wear exactly what you like. We opt for the romantic Garbo fashion, tarted up in the ’71 style, because girls are beginning to look like girls again and, although we sympathise with Women’s Lib., we don’t believe you have to look like a fella to get equal rights!

Possibly the most perfect encapsulation of the Seventies-does-Thirties aesthetic, this homage to Art Deco features some of the most lust-worthy clothes from my favourite designers and boutiques. Including Biba, Ossie Clark and some rare Antony Price for Stirling Cooper!

Photographed in the home of interior designer Graeme Gibson rather than in a studio, the authenticity is heightened by the location and the props, and then finished with the sweet illustrated photoframes.

Photographed by David Tack.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, January 1971.

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Crepe dress by Antony Price for Stirling Cooper. T-strap shoes from Sacha.

Double-Takes by Robyn Beeche

19 magazine, 1970s, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, mary quant, Midas, Prêt-à-Porter, Robyn Beeche, Russell & Bromley, strawberry studio, Uncategorized, Vintage Editorials
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Dress, worn by all models, by Prêt-à-Porter. Left: Tights by Mary Quant. Boots by Midas. Orange rope from Bazaar Shops. Sash by Strawberry Studio. Pouch by Midas. Centre: Pants by Prêt-à-Porter. Boots by Russell & Bromley. Rope and belt by Bazaar Shops. Woven belt from The Warehouse. Far right: Shirt by Fifth Avenue. Waistcoat by Casablanca. Petticoat by Strawberry Studio. Boots by Midas. Scarf by Cornelia James.

Ever been to a party in a not very exclusive dress and had that feeling that someone else is bound to be wearing the same thing? Or, maybe, you simply can’t afford more than one dress for the party season. Here are some smart ideas on how to ring the changes with just one number and be the belle of the ball every single time.

Photographed by Robyn Beeche.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1976.

An early shoot by legendary Australian photographer Robyn Beeche, who would later make her name capturing the alternative scene in London in the early 1980s and who sadly died earlier this year. Beeche is largely known for her documentation of catwalk shows and Alternative Miss World events, as well as experimental portraiture, so it’s interesting to see a more conventional studio/fashion set-up from her at the beginning of her career.

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Shirt dress, worn by all models, by Jeff Banks. Far left: Tights by Mary Quant. Shoes by Dolcis. Net scarf from Nostalgia. Gold sash by Strawberry Studio. Fabric around head and worn as sash from John Lewis. Centre: Jeans by Made in Heaven. Shoes by Sacha. Sashes by Strawberry Studio. Purses from Mitsukiku. Right: Sweater by Simon. Boots by Midas. Belt from Bazaar Shops.

Fun To Live With: Jon Wealleans and Jane Hill

19 magazine, 1970s, interiors, jane wealleans, mr freedom
Plump and luxuriously cosy, quilted cushions, with

Plump and luxuriously cosy, quilted cushions, with “Thirties” motifs.

Incredible feature on legendary pop artist and architect Jon Wealleans and his textile designer wife Jane Hill who were heavily involved with the Mr Freedom shops and products.

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, March 1971.

wealleans5Jon Weallans and Jane Hill are two ex-Royal College of Art students, both twenty-four. They were married in San Francisco six months ago, and they live and work in an Edwardian house in London’s Notting Hill Gate.

Both designers, Jane studied textile design at college, and Jon studied interior design; so, to put it simply, Jon designs the furniture, and Jane covers it. They don’t often work together but, whether working alone or together, both produce pretty off-beat stuff, as you can see from the photographs of their living-room.

Jane, who made the escalator blind, says her ideas come from magazines.

An unusual escalator roller blind, which has been silk-screen printed in red and black, on cotton.

An unusual escalator roller blind, which has been silk-screen printed in red and black, on cotton.

“I’ve just got a huge pile of visual references. Suddenly I see a picture of something and think, I could use that, and start drawing. I’ve always been interested in escalators, anyway – I have recurring dreams about them! The red flowing down these could be blood or it could be ketchup. It’s not really supposed to be morbid. There may be submerged sinister implications, but they weren’t deliberate.” (The blind is to be produced as a poster by Gallery Five.)

Jon’s answer to it is: “It’s all about making a very strange juxtaposition of two things. An escalator is an object you can identify with, and there’s suddenly a strange ooze coming out of it. It’s sinister, but afterwards you can look at escalators in a new way.”

Jane is also responsible for the cushions. She used ‘Thirties’ motifs and giant shoes; silk-screened on to satin, then quilted and made up into cushions. She commented: “I suppose in the ‘Thirties, people said, ‘Why on earth paint a piece of newspaper and a dead fish?’ And perhaps the artist replied: ‘Because people haven’t looked at an old newspaper and a dead fish before.’

“It’s important, because I think a decorative thing usually ends up being around for quite a long time, and I don’t very much like the idea of doing things which you can’t look at, and afterwards think: ‘Ali, I didn’t see it quite like that before.’ ”

“We’re both designers, and that’s all we’re good at,” confeses Jon. “We have no other perks, this is how we make our bread. The people I respect most are the people who have come to terms with the fact that they are making a living, and that they are not arty dilettantes. They are the people who are really on the ball, and who can get up and do a bit of graphic design on their knee, whilst eating beans on toast, or whilst watching television.

“What you need in all forms of art is a sense of humour. I can’t stand people who get all heavy, and take themselves that seriously, be-cause I don’t think anybody should think like this unless they are in a fantastically serious cause.”

Jon was commissioned to design the new Mr. Freedom shop in Ken-sington, London, and it is for this that he designed the false teeth chair. It is made of PVC covered foam, and has a fake fur tongue—a masterpiece of upholstering by Felicity Youett. (It’s sold by Mr. Freedom for £160.)

A false teeth sofa, with a soft and life-like tongue for some idle lounging.

A false teeth sofa, with a soft and life-like tongue for some idle lounging.

“The teeth may seem pretty funny,” he says, “but if you go and sit on the Underground in the rush hour and look at those people, they’re pretty funny. I mean, who’s the funniest? Maybe Mr. Freedom are the most honest funny people in Lon-don, because the people who wear their clothes look really happy. And, with my furniture, I’d like to give just a few people a bit of a buzz, by looking at it. I’d like them to think again.

“My ideas usually come in a functional way. I really did want a unit that could make up a bed, sofa or a room, which is what the jigsaw seats do.” (Each unit costs £30 from Mr. Freedom.) “It’s the most obvious thing really, because you can rearrange them to any shape. They are in candy-floss coloured, metallic PVC covered foam.

Intriguing foam-filled and interlocking jigsaw seats, can be pieced together or else used separately.

Intriguing foam-filled and interlocking jigsaw seats, can be pieced together or else used separately.

“The false teeth are a bit of a con, because they originally started out as a piece of pop, soft sculp-ture, and we only realised when we opened them, that you could make a seat. It is really a case of taking something perfectly normal and everyday, and blowing it up to giant proportions, so that people will look at it twice and think about the ordinary item again.

“It seems pointless to keep designing the same things. No one need ever design another chair; there are enough for the next fifty years, because there are guys around who have solved the problem completely. After a while, you get an optimum solution and I think Le Corbusier had the optimum solution for a chair in the ‘Thirties, so why carry on now doing Design Centre chain?”

The only furniture he didn’t design in their living-room, are the white plastic stacking chairs by Jo Colombo of Italy, which are sold in this country in Habitat, £11 each. The chrome dining chairs are sold at Habitat shops for £18 each. The floor is covered with white lino tiles, which you can buy in packets, and lay yourself.

They are working on their bedroom. A giant Orson Welles film-set bed, placed on fur-covered Busby Berkeley steps, is planned, and the room will be in navy, scarlet and silver. They are painting stars on the, ceiling and having a neon ‘hello’ sign on the wall. Jon’s designs are certainly different, but he’s not entirely devoted to the freaky. As he says, “I did the main branch of the Bank of England in Leeds, and they were the straightest people. You couldn’t get further away from Mr. Freedom if you tried.

“The acid test would be to do something like a home for the blind, because you couldn’t do anything visual, it would all have to be spot on, and really good. No colour, jokes or imagery. That would really sort out the sheep from the goats. Or if someone living in this road said, ‘Do my bedsitter for £10.’ Now that’s the sort of problem I’d really enjoy working on.”