All Night Long

1970s, Bata, biba, bus stop, Esme Young, francois lamy, gillian richard, Honey Magazine, lee bender, Malcolm Scoular, Martha Hill, medusa, rowley and oram, Syndica, terry de havilland

It’s the girl who still looks slinky by the time it’s light again who gets taken home by the Prince. We’ve found eight party frocks which look amazingly ritzy into the dawn when other night-birds have wilted.

A rescan from 2010, partly because it deserved it anyway but also in tribute to the legendary and much-missed Terry de Havilland, whose tiered snakeskin wedges make an early appearance here (credited to Rowley and Oram, who stocked his shoes).

Photographed by Francois Lamy and Malcolm Scoular.

Scanned from Honey Magazine, December 1970.

Dress by Medusa. Choker by Esme Young. Two tone green snakeskin shoes from Rowley & Oram (Terry de Havilland)
Lurex laced up dress by Gillian Richard. Snakeskin party shoes from Rowley & Oram (Terry de Havilland)
Cocoa brown panne velvet dress by Syndica. Brown patent bar shoes by Bata.
Crepe dress by Bus Stop. Shoes by Bata. Black beaded belt found in Grandma’s old attic. Dressing gown cord tied as a choker by Biba. Artificial violets from Biba. Black bag by Martha Hill.
Slippery satin jet black dress with black and tan spotted voile jacket by Martha Hill. Two-coloured snakeskin shoes from Rowley & Oram (Terry de Havilland).

Inspirational Images: Chiffons and snakeskins

1970s, Bibette, british boutique movement, Chelsea Antiques Market, david bailey, Hope and Eleanor, Inspirational Images, kensington market, moyra swan, rowley and oram, terry de havilland, thea porter, Vogue, zandra rhodes

Printed silk chiffon looped into a skirt, gathered from a tiny blue satin bodice, with blue satin ribbon at hem. By Zandra Rhodes, £89, at Fortnum & Mason. Tiered metallic platform shoes, 9gns, at Rowley & Oram of Kensintyon Market. Beaded choker, by Bibette, from range at Thea Porter. Rings from Hope and Eleanor, Chelsea Antique Market.

Printed silk chiffon looped into a skirt, gathered from a tiny blue satin bodice, with blue satin ribbon at hem. By Zandra Rhodes, £89, at Fortnum & Mason. Tiered metallic platform shoes, 9gns, at Rowley & Oram of Kensintyon Market. Beaded choker, by Bibette, from range at Thea Porter. Rings from Hope and Eleanor, Chelsea Antique Market.

Another early appearance from Terry de Havilland, whose shoes were sold out of Rowley & Oram in Kensington Market and often not credited. I would [possibly] kill for those shoes. And the dress isn’t half bad either…

Photographed by Bailey

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, June 1970

Guide to Feminine London

1970s, biba, Boston-151, british boutique movement, carnaby street, countdown, crowthers, Emmerton and Lambert, Foale and Tuffin, Illustrations, Janet Ibbotson, just looking, laura ashley, marrian mcdonnell, Michael Farrell, mr freedom, rowley and oram, stirling cooper, stop the shop, Suliman, thea porter, universal witness, yves saint laurent

Illustrated by Michael Farrell. Click to enlarge.

Oh I do love a good map. Especially a fantastically illustrated map of all my favourite shops in London in 1971. It is the nearest I will ever come to being able to walk around them. Sadness ensues…

Scanned from Vanity Fair, July 1971.

De Havillands in Casablanca

19 magazine, johnny moke, platforms, rowley and oram, seventies fashion, terry de havilland

Left: Dress by Clobber, shoes by Rowley and Oram. Right: Dress by Crowthers, shoes by Mary Quant.

After my Hollywood Clothes Shop post the other day, what should I find in a January 1971 (I am a geek on so many different levels…) copy of 19 Magazine but this amazing Forties-styled shoot. I actually aspire to this entire look so badly I want to cry just looking at it.

The amazing snakeskin and suede shoes throughout the shoot are credited to ‘Rowley and Oram’ (which, itself, is quite odd since I assumed that ‘label’ became defunct when Hollywood Clothes Shop opened…), which we can now all assume means that these shoes are by the amazing Mr Terry De Havilland. I’m not sure at what point his name became much coveted, but it’s interesting that he should be so badly uncredited here.

Left: Dress by Louis Caring. Right: Dress by Fotheringay and Hepplewaite, shoes by Mary Quant.

Dress by Tony Berkeley, shoes by Elliotts.

Left: Dress by Louis Caring, shoes by Rowley and Oram. Right: Linda Warren for Downtown, shoes by Rowley and Oram.

Left: Dress by Louis Caring, shoes by Elliotts. Right: Outfit by Tony Berkeley, shoes by Freeman Hardy Willis.

Left: Dress by Marlborough, shoes by Freeman Hardy Willis. Right: Dress by Louis Caring, shoes by Rowley and Oram.