Yankee Swank

1970s, biba, Bombacha, Charles Batten, Crocodile, Diane Logan, Fenwick, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, liberty, liberty's, Monet, monty coles, quorum, radley, Spectrum, Sujon, Vintage Editorials, Wardrobe
Giant pink lily printed cotton dress with swirling flared skirt from Biba

City life heats up when the sidewalks are crowded and the cabs full. Give yourself a break and see the sights. Step out in cotton dresses for a cool look at a hot town.

Photographed by Monty Coles.

Scanned from Honey, August 1975.

Open necked short sleeved printed crepe de chine dress by Radley from Quorum. Fringe scarf from Wardrobe. Hat by Charles Batten.
Mint green cotton dress by Strawberry Studio from Che Guevara. Scarf from Fenwick.
Cream cotton dress with drawstring waist by Monet. Scarf from Liberty. Hat by Charles Batten.
Navy and mauve cotton poplin dress by Monet.
Beige and mulberry flower printed crepe de chine dress by Sujon. Scarf from Fenwick.
Slash neck cotton cheesecloth dress from Crocodile. Scarf from Liberty.
Rust cotton open necked baggy dress from Bombacha. Cloche by Diane Logan.
Pale pink and white leaf printed dress from Biba. Scarf from Liberty. Hat by Charles Batten.
Navy and rust checked and striped crepe de chine dress with matching scarf from Spectrum.

Make Wicker Work

1970s, cosmopolitan, Inspirational Images, interior design, interiors
Turn your bedroom into a garden-room with plants piled into a wired jardiniere, flowers parked on bamboo tables and a white cotton coverlet on the bed. Do as the Edwardians did – place your sofa at the foot of the bed and enjoy the fine art of lolling.

Take the summer indoors with conservatory furniture that gives the garden feeling to any room.

The merest breath of a heat-wave brings out the Southern Belle in our souls. Hot afternoons and long, sunlit evenings make you long to loll about on wicker chaises, sipping lemon tea. The dry, woody smell, the evocative creak of wicker and cane furniture is the essence of summer and, unlike some summer passions, cane and wicker survive and work in winter, too. Annick Clavier, a young French designer, chooses her wicker well—painting some junk-shop finds in white enamel, oiling other pieces of wicker and bamboo to a fine Oriental shine. Her taste runs to airy, lacy furniture and rush matting, set off by many green plants, small jugs of flowers and reproductions of romantic paintings. The fact that she has a garden helps the tropical feeling. Wicker freaks look for decorative pieces in junk shops and markets. They learn to mend broken furniture but avoid bamboo or cane pieces that are very rickety, and watch for the pinholes—a sign that the dreaded woodworm is in residence. Secondhand shops in coastal towns and the remote parts of Scotland and Wales are good places to find Victorian and Edwardian garden and nursery furniture. London has the best selection of shops with modern cane and rattan furniture, mostly imported: Conran, 77 Fulham Road, SW3 imports from China; Cane, 170 Walton Street, SW3 imports from India, as does The Warehouse, 39 Neal Street, London, WC2.

Photographs by Phillippe Leroy.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1976.

Heads you win

1970s, alkasura, Andreas George, Bermona, Feathers, hans feurer, hats, Inspirational Images, Jean Charles Brosseau, jean shrimpton, liberty, liberty's, mr freedom, quorum, ritva, sunday times magazine, Vintage Editorials
One of a selection of hats designed by Andreas George that are decorated with anything from fake flowers, ribbons, plastic fruit to tiny furry animals. £7 from Alkasura, 304 King’s Road, SW3

Suddenly this summer the shops are selling masses of hats that before would have only been dug up for garden parties, weddings, sports days or camping it up. For years magazines and designers have shown their clothes with hats, but they don’t usually turn up in the street. Fashion editors often feature ‘picture hats’ like those on the previous page posed in some romantic setting or framing an immaculate new make-up, but one never actually sees them on a number 19 bus. Now hats have gone the way of all clothes; there are no rules; you can wear anything with anything. Any hat, whether it’s wide-brimmed and floppy with half a haberdashery department stuck over it, or a small crocheted cloche pinned with a bunch of plastic fruit, i fine with either nostalgic Forties’ dresses or a dirty old pair of jeans. And you can still wear it to a wedding if you want to.

Modelled by Jean Shrimpton.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, June 20th 1971.

Smooth straw hat with fake anemones, by Bermona, £2.85 from Dickins and Jones.
Cotton cloche pinned back with a bunch of cherries if you like, £4.50 from Quorum. Check and spot crepe shirt £4.20 from Mr Freedom, 20 Kensington Church Street. White cotton shorts by Ritva £7.88 from Countdown, 137 King’s Road.
Pink felt hat with bright harlequin pattern under the brim by Jean Charles Brosseau, £7 from Feathers, 43 Kensington High Street.
Plain wide-brimmed panama hat, £2.85 from Liberty’s.

How to seduce the man in your life

1970s, Inspirational Images, malcolm bird

(If he hasn’t already seduced you, of course!)

Illustration by Malcolm Bird.

Scanned from Petticoat magazine, 8th November 1969.

Take a flower for your hair

1970s, barbara daly, barry lategan, Hair and make-up, Inspirational Images, Mouche (model), pablo and delia, Vogue

Take a flower for your hair, gather up a halter top, now dust on the glamour…

First flower, airy petals of summer pink net, outlined in white stitching, round white button for stamens. By Pablo and Delia, to order at Browns. Ruched halter top, flower printed seersucker, also by Pablo and Delia.

Make-up by Barbara Daly. Hair by John at Leonard. Model is Mouche.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, May 1972.

Meet the designer: Thea Porter

1970s, Golden Hands, Inspirational Images, John Carter, thea porter

Thea Porter describes the women she designs for as “thirtyish, tall and slim,” but she laughingly adds that “I design clothes that I know will suit me too, so they do just as well for short, fat people.” Whatever their shape, Thea Porter’s customers live a high-society, jet-set life. Their clothes must be dramatic, brilliant and packable, and Thea Porter designs are exactly what they need; the clothes are among the most coveted in the world. How did Thea break into the rarefied atmosphere of high-fashion design?

In 1965, Thea and a couple of friends launched an interior decorating service. “we started the fashion for enormous cushions, and we were just beginning to make a name for ourselves,”‘ Thea reminisced, “when I happened to bring back an antique caftan from overseas. I wanted to use the material in a decorat-ing scheme. Suddenly caftans came in to vogue but the only ones you could get from abroad were either minute or voluminous. So, with the help of a dressmaker, I started making caftans from lovely old fabrics. Then a photo-graph of Fenella Fielding wearing one of my caftans appeared in the Daily Express. More people began wanting them and eventually I decided to bring out a collection which I showed in a Kensington restaurant. I was still mainly a decorator but from then on things started snowballing. I had designed some jackets with masses and masses of braid which the Beatles bought, for instance. At the end of 1967, I took the plunge and started the shop in Greek Street.”

Without any formal training, Thea Porter became a dress designer. She knows nothing of cutting and sewing, and recalls her only attempt at dress-making as a child when she succeeded in cutting through her own skirt! An assistant takes all her designs to the pattern and cutting stage. The import-ant thing, to Thea, is the designing. She describes her philosophy quite simply. Using her hands to emphasise, she explains “you know how a line of poetry sounds right, as if it has been waiting for someone to write it down. That’s how it must be with a dress. It must be a complete entity and nothing must jar —unless clashing colours are an intrinsic part of the design. The shape, colour and fabric should be in perfect harmony. I put together every detail of the dress myself — down to the last button.”

Thea finds that she designs best away from her Soho shop, and works in spurts according to her mood, but she finds it difficult to describe the sources of her inspiration. “My two absolute standards are that I must like the dress myself, and every season I try to bring out five good shape’s. The collections are different every time. It can take me three weeks to do a collection — or three months. Some-times I get my inspiration from a fabric. Sometimes I do a sketch and then choose a fabric. I often buy fabrics without having the least idea of what I shall do with them.”

“I don’t use a method that you could describe”, she continues thoughtfully. “There are so many influences. For example I got the idea for a nautical theme when I was leafing through a book on Victorian painters. To be a designer I think you need a broad culture — certainly my knowledge of the East has shaped my creative thinking. A conventional art course would have been a waste of time for me.”

Thea Porter specialises in glamorous evening clothes and if there is a theme running through her creations, it is that the materials are almost invariably soft, flimsy and graceful and chosen to reveal the contours of the body. She buys them from all over the world: from India, Italy, Switzerland, France and England. She designs some fabrics herself. “I do a sketch, give it to a textile designer to translate, we work out the colours and we have it made up.” Expensive? “Very,” she agrees.

The tiny Thea Porter shop in Greek Street, London, is full of the exotic feeling she translates so expertly into her clothes. Amid the display of dia-phanous dresses, rolls of richly coloured fabrics are heaped on shelves and piled several deep against the wall in glorious disarray. From a battered cardboard box, a profusion of braids and ribbons tumble like wild flowers. A litter of photos, sketches and other paraphernalia are pinned around her desk. The casual atmosphere is typical of Thea Porter’s spontaneous approach to designing. There is, however, nothing at all naive about her ideas and plans for the future.

Until recently, Thea, was thinking on two planes, Britain and America. “The main difference between the two markets is that American women have such perfect figures and they like waisted clothes with plunging necklines.” Now she is working in yet another dimension — ready-to-wear. Not content with this, she is already planning new outlets. “I would like to do wedding clothes, children’s wear and lingerie. But there would always have to be lots of evening dresses. A woman feels different in the evening, more relaxed and prettier.”

Interview by Rosemary Simon.

Photographs by John Carter.

Scanned from Golden Hands Monthly, September 1972

The Seven Faces of Beauty

1970s, barry lategan, beauty, Gina Fratini, Hair and make-up, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, Make-up, Sujon, Vintage Adverts, Vivienne Lynn, Vogue
Monday’s Child is Fair of Face. Blue flowers from Novelty Imports. Blue silk blouse by Sujon.

A stunningly styled and photographed advertisement feature for Boots No7 cosmetics, based around the ‘Monday’s Child’ nursery rhyme (although they’ve muddled up Friday and Saturday as far as I remember it). As a Tuesday’s child, I’m pretty happy with my lot although never sure how graceful I am. Which one are you? I particularly love Vivienne Lynn’s mournful Wednesday’s Child.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1972.

Tuesday’s Child is Full of Grace. Pink voile blouse by Plainclothes. Hat by Herbert Johnson.
Wednesday’s Child is Full of Woe.
Thursday’s Child has Far to Go
Friday’s Child works hard for her living.
Saturday’s Child is Loving and Giving.
And the child that is born on the Sabbath Day is Bonny and Blithe, Good and Gay. White smock top by Gina Fratini.

The Shortest Summer

1970s, Copper Coin, Crochetta, Elliott, harold ingram, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, mary quant, Maudie Moon, mr freedom, ravel, Richard Selby, Russell & Bromley, Sharcleod, simon massey, stirling cooper, terry de havilland, Vintage Editorials

After the explosion of hot pants and vulgar satin knickers, shorts are still with us, but they’ve emerged neater and brighter – put together with layered vests and skimpy sweaters, legs that go on forever and bright vampy shoes or clogs. It’s the only way to be cool this summer.

Photographed by Richard Selby.

Scanned from Honey, June 1971

Far left: T-shirt by Maudie Moon. Clingy crepe shorts by Simon Massey. Thigh high socks by Mr Freedom. Left: Banlon bomber jacket and plain fluted shorts by Jeff Banks. Tights by Quant. Right: Banlon vest, shorts and shirt all by John Marks. Tights by Quant. Shoes by Ravel. Far right: Banlon vest with plain black shorts by John Marks. Banlon shirt by Jeff Banks. Tights by Quant. Shoes by Elliotts.
Far left: Striped cotton knit sweater and plain shorts by Zeekit by Crochetta. Stripy socks by Echo. Lavender suede shoes by Dolcis. Left: Halter neck knit sweater and shorts by Zeekit by Crochetta. Socks by Quant. Clogs by Russell & Bromley. Right: Stripy ribbed vest by Shar-Cleod. Scarlet jersey shorts by Stirling Cooper. Socks by Sunarama. Snakeskin wedge shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Skinny sweater and matching mini vest by Syndica. Linen shorts by Friends. Socks by Quant. Red clogs by Wardle and Williams.
Left to right: Striped skinny rib sweater by Janine at Harold Ingram. Yellow shorts by Copper Coin. Vest and red pepper shorts with green patch pockets both by Peter London. Rainbow acrylic vest by Peter London. Yellow jersey shorts by Stirling Cooper. Woollen football vest by Van der Fransen. Cherry red shirt by Littlewoods. Red Orlon shorts by Syndica.

Pretty Pieces

19 magazine, 1970s, Adrian Mann, Bombacha, Elizabeth Huxley, Inspirational Images, Susan Backhouse, swimwear, Vintage Editorials
Turquoise and yellow net bikini by Susan Backhouse. Bone and shell necklaces from Bombacha. Fish earring by Nicholas Adams.

I told you there was a lot of swimwear in this issue, didn’t I? I’m amazed by these Susan Backhouse pieces. I’ve only ever had one piece by her which is an incredible, voluminous cotton skirt in the style of Vivienne Westwood, so I’m boggling at these skimpy, pop-art inspired swimsuits and bikinis.

Photographed by Elizabeth Huxley. Hair and make-up by Colin Booker.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1979.

Blue one-piece with shell applique by Susan Backhouse. Bone necklace from Bombacha.
Pale blue and pink shell shaped bikini by Susan Backhouse. Fish earring by Nicholas Adams. Bone necklaces from Bombacha.
Yellow costume with star fish applique by Susan Backhouse. Bone and shell necklaces from Bombacha.
Turquoise bikini with star fish motif by Susan Backhouse. Blue earrings by Adrien Mann. Necklace by Nicholas Adams.

Easy on the eye

19 magazine, 1970s, Hair and make-up, Illustrations, Miners, philip castle, Vintage Adverts
Miners make the most of your eyes

(Uncredited artist but it looks like it could well be the work of Philip Castle)

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1979.