You know how good it feels (Part 1)

19 magazine, 1970s, art deco, Deco Inspired, Illustrations, Lyn Gray

Magic moments, happy moments, moments alone and moments together—you know how good all that feels. And nothing feels better than that touch of luxury when it comes your way unexpectedly. Just in case you don’t know, we want to prove it, by putting that touch of luxury within your reach. For us, the ‘Thirties, perhaps more than any other era, set the mood for elegance and glamour, and we’ve chosen all our prizes in styles and shades to capture that mood.

A series of eight blissfully brilliant illustrations accompanying a competition feature. There is also a stunning photograph which I will post tomorrow as I thought these deserved their own post.

Illustrations by Lyn Gray.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1974.

Is there anything you can’t wear?

1970s, Ace, cosmopolitan, Daily Blue, Midas, Vintage Adverts
Silver jumpsuit Dailyblue at Ace, boots Midas, reassurance by Panty Pads.

Sanpro goes New Wave! Of course this image is far too good for a Dr. White’s advert really.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, July 1977.

Hong Kong

19 magazine, 1970s, Alan Rodin, alice pollock, antony price, Bata, biba, Inspirational Images, John Bishop, Jolly and Marsh, lilley and skinner, Norma Moriceau, ravel, stirling cooper, universal witness, van der fransen, Vintage Editorials, yves saint laurent
Palest green Dicel satin blouse with glass buttons, £5.25. Apple green circular skirt in silk and rayon mixture, £8.75. Both from Universal Witness. Green tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Red patent shoes from Yves Saint Laurent, £14.

The look is tarty—and where better to go for background atmosphere than Hong Kong, sinful city of the Orient, perfect setting for saucy ladies of ill-repute. In this rich, bustling East/West meeting point, with its maze of colourful streets and endless shops bursting with tax-free jade, pearls and cameras. one gets the feeling that beyond these elegant facades are hidden opium dens, James Bond intrigues, and seamy Suzie Wong bars. We took the ferry across from Kowloon to Hong Kong and travelled to Aberdeen—a small, picturesque harbour inlet filled with over eight thousand junks and sampans, ornate floating restaurants selling delicious, fresh seafood, and crowded local markets.

Styled by Norma Moriceau.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1971.

The styling and clothes in this editorial (I mean, green tights and red platforms? Swoon!) are something close to flawless. Unlike the copy -which I have still posted as a historical document- and also, possibly, the use of local residents as ‘extras’. I occasionally feel the need to clarify that I don’t necessarily endorse all elements of things I post, but I also don’t think it benefits us to completely censor history – especially when one is creating an archive.

Satin print blouse, from Van Der Fransen, £2. Blue cotton skirt with white print and ruffled dipping hem, by Universal Witness, £7.35. Tights by Mary Quant, 75p. Purple leather sandals, from Bata International, £7. Satin shawl with black fringing, from Van Der Fransen, £5.
White sleeveless Dicel satin dress with large blue flower design, by Universal Witness, £14.70. Apple green mock lizard sandals, by Bally, £6-50. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Moss crepe dress by Alice Pollock at Radley, £13.50. Tight by Mary Quant, 75p. Patent wedge sandals by Yves Saint Laurent, £14. Bracelets from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
White crepe dress with moon print and matching shorts by Antony Price at Stirling Cooper, £10. Ankle strap shoes, from Ravel, £5.99.
Cotton jersey halter-neck top and slit skirt in green and yellow floral print, by Alan Rodin, £5. Navy suede laced sandals, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Bracelet from a selection at Jolly and Marsh.
Black Tricel dress with beige print has cap sleeves and sash tie, by Biba, £8.55. Navy sandals with lacings, by Lilley and Skinner, £8.95. Neckklace from a selection at Kensington Market. Rings are model’s own. Flower from Fogg and Wakefield.

In Spring, a young man’s fancy turns to Courtelle.

1970s, frank usher, harpers and queen, Vintage Adverts


“I’m the young man standing in front of the sunset looking as if butter wouldn’t melt in my mouth. I was caught red-handed mooning around the two girls in the picture, and they asked me to write this ad. They want me to tell you that the clothes they are wearing are designed by Frank Usher, and made in Courtelle Voile. Apparently that is a light, flowing fabric in 100% Courtelle, and is as easy to wash as throwing into a washing machine. I believe them, after all, who’s going to argue with such good looking girls”.

Can any men out there confirm if this is, indeed, true? I had no idea you all thought about synthetic fabrics so much to be honest…

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, May 1975.

Livia

1970s, Angela Landels, harpers and queen, Illustrations, Vicky Tiel, Vintage Adverts
“Clothes to be loved in.”

Dress by Vicky Tiel.

Illustrator uncredited. (Possibly Angela Landels).

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, May 1975.

A breath of green

1970s, beauty, belinda bellville, charles jourdan, david bailey, Garrard, Inspirational Images, maudie james, Vogue
The greenest scent of summer—Estee Lauder’s Alliage with hints of marigold, jasmine and muguet, to wear with green chiffon, and Estee Lauder’s new Copper and Bronze Make-up.

Model is Maudie James.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1973.

Daisy lawn chiffon caped over bandeau bra with shoulder straps, blowing into a herbaceous hem. By Bellville Sassoon. Daisy brooch of diamonds and peridot on one ear, £4,400, at Collingwood. Snake bracelets, diamonds and garnet, £3,205, diamonds and emerald, £850, at Garrard. Emerald and gold ring by Arthur King, £1,360, at Blooms. Carved emerald ring surrounded by two rows of diamonds, £1,250 at Michael Fishberg. Round pin in the hair, left, diamonds and sapphires, emeralds and rubies, £950, Cameo Corner. Pale yellow tights, Mary Quant, 40p, Selfridges. Dior sandals, £24, Charles Jourdan

District Line

1970s, Holly, Honey Magazine, Illustrations

Illustration for a short story by Diana Winsor called District Line.

Illustrated by Holly.

Scanned from Honey, July 1974.

That old black magic

1970s, harpers and queen, Inspirational Images, jewellery, Vintage Adverts
Black steel and diamond jewellery made by Roger Doyle. One collection in an exclusive catalogue available from Jones (jeweller) at 52 Beauchamp Place London SW3.

Photographer, model and make-up artist sadly all unknown for now.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, June 1977.

Boots care for hair. Colourfully.

19 magazine, 1970s, Boots, Inspirational Images, platforms, Vintage Adverts
The Boots Electrical Beauty range is just about the prettiest you’ll find anywhere. Hairdryers, heated hair rollers and lady shavers in spring-time colours like Lilac, Soft Lavender, Peach, Cream and lots more. Another thing you’ll find is that all these lovely things cost a lot less than other popular makes. But that’s what you expect from Boots products isn’t it? The Boots Beauty Care range. The prettiest things , to make you look your prettiest.

I’m not sure it gets much more 1973 than the styling here. Almost worthy of a Roxy Music cover. In fact, it wouldn’t surprise me if it was consciously or subconsciously influenced by that.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, July 1973.

Great shakes!

1970s, Adrian Mann, Asprey, Bugatti, Cocktails, cosmopolitan, eric boman, Inspirational Images, Jane Cattlin, liberty, liberty's
Her dress by Jane Cattlin. Necklace by Adrien Mann. His clothes at Bugatti. Cocktail accessories from Asprey and Liberty. Hair by Tony at Molton Brown.

Celebrate the Great Cocktail Revival. Try your hand at shaking drinks, just as those ‘Thirties movie heroes used to do. Rather more than prettily coloured drinks, cocktails can pack quite a lethal punch, so we’ve included some recipes that will let you drink and drive.

Well that’s my Friday night sorted, let me know if you try any yourself!

Photographed by Eric Boman.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, June 1975.

“Cocktails create good vibes in dark times,” says Peter Morton who runs London’s trendiest cocktail bar, Morton’s, to which all the models, photographers and other celebrities flock after a hard day under the arc lights. You can fix cocktails in the soothing surroundings of your own home—and at half the price—if you’re willing to take a little trouble. The one instrument you must invest in if you want to make a perfect cocktail is a cocktail shaker. Lots of the big stores are stocking them now and prices at Selfridges start at £4.65 for a plastic shaker, £6 for a more aesthetic stainless steel number. All cocktails should be mixed with plenty of ice and you must use fresh ice every time you shake up a new round of drinks, otherwise they’ll taste watery. Decorate cocktails with pieces of fresh fruit—lemons, limes and oranges—and maraschino cherries on sticks. All the recipes below were supplied by barman extraordinaire Arnold of Widow Applebaum’s, South Molton St, London W1. Now start shaking . . .