Make-up for white, pink and green

1970s, Buckle Under, dorothee bis, Hair and make-up, harpers and queen, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, james wedge, Make-up, Michaeljohn, Serge Lutens, wallis
Eyes are the focal point in this make-up for white by Serge Lutens of Christian Dior. Wide-brimmed black felt hat by Herbert Johnson.

This year you match your make-up to what you are wearing rather than to the colouring you were born with. Now, with the much greater variety of colours available, it is no longer blue for blue eyes, green for green eyes; or pink and white for blondes and gold-rachel tones for brunettes. You can have a new look for every day of the week, or different looks for day and night. In fact, you match your make-up to your clothes.

To show how much scope there is, we have taken one girl and given her three different make-ups created for each of this season’s new fashion colours.

Make-up for white by Serge Lutens. Make-up for Pink and Green by Mary Lou of The Face Place.

Hair by Pauline of Michaeljohn.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, early October 1971.

The make-up for pink incorporates all the new plum, mulberrt, grape and frosted pink make-up tones. Hat by Buckle Under. Pink jacket by Dorothee Bis.
For this season’s many shades of green there are lots of exciting new eye make-up colours. Emerald satin blazer by Wallis. Flowers from Bourne and Hollingsworth.

Summer at Source

1970s, biba, celia birtwell, Emmanuelle Khanh, gerald mccann, Herbert Johnson, ingrid boulting, Inspirational Images, norman parkinson, ossie clark, Suliman, Vintage Editorials, Vogue
Tiger lily silk dress 31gns at Biba.

Following Gaudi’s thought “to be original, return to the origin”, following it down to Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire where William Fox Talbot invented the camera, Norman Parkinson photographed eight dresses conjured from pure air and gauze.

This is like an album where every song is a certified banger. From the model, to the frocks, to the photographer, to the photographer he’s referencing, everything is flawless. Except that I don’t own all these dresses.

Photographed by Norman Parkinson.

Modelled by Ingrid Boulting.

Photographed at Lacock Abbey.

Scanned from Vogue, July 1970.

Silk gauze in pale straw with green and mauve. By Ossie Clark, Celia Birtwell print, about 25gns.
Silk chiffon dress in Celia Birtwell print by Ossie Clark, £40. Cap at Herbert Johnson.
Flower garden dress of crisp muslin. By Gerald McCann, £16 5s. 6d.
Black printed Indian cotton dress 10gns at Suliman.
Blackberry on black Indian cotton dress by Gerald McCann, £16 5s. 6d.
Silk chiffon dress in Celia Birtwell print by Ossie Clark, £40.
Fish finned cotton dress by Emmanuelle Khanh, about £30 to order.

Last Tango in Tijuana

1970s, antony price, che guevara, Dinah Adams, Dolcis, gillian richard, granny takes a trip, Herbert Johnson, Honey Magazine, Ian Batten, Inspirational Images, jean junction, Martha Hill, miss mouse, polly peck, rae spencer cullen, Roy A. Giles, Russell & Bromley, Samm, Spectrum, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials, wallis

If you can’t tango, simply steal into the spotlight in these flamboyant rumba dresses. The slipped shoulder strap, the bared midriff and the full-blown flouncy skirts all spell out the sexiest numbers for summer.

The main difference between the content of a magazine like Honey, as opposed to Vogue or Queen, is that the designers tend to be the more intriguing and less well-known of the period. If you want names like Miss Mouse, Granny Takes a Trip or Antony Price, these magazines should always be your first port of call. This shoot alone features one of my Holy Grail pieces by Granny Takes a Trip: the ruffled tie front top and skirt ensemble designed by Dinah Adams. Previously a designer for two other cult London boutiques, Mr Freedom and Paradise Garage, painfully little is known about Dinah Adams (misattributed as ‘Diana’ in the original credits). Which is why it’s always lovely to see her work represented anywhere.

Also shown here is a frothy, frilly delight of a frock by Miss Mouse, a.k.a Rae Spencer-Cullen. A personal favourite of mine, the Miss Mouse aesthetic is precisely why this early Seventies period is my favourite for fashion. Her work was heavily Fifties-inspired, quite ahead of the curve in the scheme of things, but always with a novel twist. Spencer-Cullen is yet another designer whose life remains something of a mystery, despite being a part of a hugely influential circle which included artists Duggie Fields and Andrew Logan. It seems that this anonymity was (at least initially) intentional, as an article from the Glasgow Herald in 1976 declared.

“At first, six years ago, when presenting her quirky designs on fashion, she seemed shy and utterly retiring. Miss Mouse could not be contacted easily by the press. She was elusive, hazed in shadows, a real mouse about publicity in fact. The only evidence of her entire existence was her clothes.”

In a world where we are so used to having information at our fingertips, there is something quite enchanting about this; tiny scraps must be stitched together to create a flimsy silhouette of a creative genius.

Photographed by Roy A Giles.

Scanned from Honey, July 1973.

(Please note – this blog originally appeared in 2016 on Shrimpton Couture’s ‘Curated’ blog project which has since been removed. It seemed a shame to let the posts disappear completely so I hope to eventually repost all my work here.)

Rose-strewn wrapover cotton bolero and long frilled skirt from Spectrum. Raffia and cotton tie belt by Herbert Johnson. Right: Tightly ruched off-the-shoulder top and long skirt with deeply riched waistband from Wallis.
Ritzy ruffled satin bolero top with frilled skirt by Dinah Adams for Granny Takes a Trip. Wavy leather sandals by Samm. Right: Slinky spotted Tricel dress by Ian Batten at Stirling Cooper. Crackly taffeta long flounced skirt by Antony Price for Che Guevara. Wooden and patent sandals by Russell & Bromley.
Flouncy black and white gingham off-the-shoulder dress printed with orange and lemon flowers by Gillian Richard. Canary yellow sandals by Samm. Embroidered cummerbund by Herbert Johnson.
Swirling striped cotton skirt by Jean Junction. Off-the-shoulder pleated blouse by Martha Hill. Polished leather boots from Dolcis.
Black cotton ruched and flared rumba dress printed with multi-coloured flowers and birds by Miss Mouse. Apple green shoes by Russell & Bromley.

Left: Crisp cotton gingham blouse and flounced skirt both by Martha Hill. Oval bead choker and bangles by Paul Stephens. Right: Ruffled cotton check blouse and tiered skirt by Polly Peck. Cummerbund by Herbert Johnson. Shoes by Russell & Bromley.

Do or Dye

1970s, bus stop, Fifth Avenue, Herbert Johnson, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, kensington market, lee bender, Nike Williams, roger stowell, Sacha, Second Skin, Syndica, Vintage Editorials

Originality being one of the spices of life, isn’t it about time you did a bit of gentle artwork on some of your plainer clothes? We appliquéd satin designs on unadorned cotton T-shirts, but if you haven’t the patience to appliqué clouds with silver linings, how about tie dye instead?

Hoping this gives some inspiration to keep yourself occupied and looking groovy over the next weeks and months of isolation! In all seriousness, I hope all my dear readers are safe and well. Since my Vintage business is on ice for a little while, I have brought magazines home to scan and hope to keep you entertained and offer some escapism (plus there are years of archives to get through!). There will probably be extra stuff over on my Instagram as well so do go and follow me there.

(Instructions on how to copy these designs are at the bottom of the post.)

Set and designs by Nike Williams.

Photographs by Roger Stowell.

Drawings by H. Abbo.

Scanned from Honey, August 1970.

Rising sunset appliquéd onto a plain white jersey vest by Syndica. Shiny satin trousers by Second Skin. Red wet-look boots by Sacha.
Riot of hearts appliquéd on to a long plain black vest dress, Syndica. Beaded leather thonged armband from Bus Stop
White cotton jersey long vest dress by Syndica, tie-dyed yellow with large white circles. Patchwork belt by Fifth Avenue. Beaded thonged rope by Bus Stop. Silk scarf from Kensington Market.
Satin appliquéd steamboat on a plain scarlet cotton jersey tunic, Syndica. Patchwork leather belt from Fifth Avenue. Canvas sunhat by Herbert Johnson. Satin trousers by Second Skin.
Pink cotton jersey tunic, Syndica, tie-dyed plum with a pink border print. Stretchy webbing belt from Fenwicks. Green perspex sunshade from Lillywhites.
Pink button-up vest, Chester Martin, tie-dyed red with pink leaf pattern. Red cotton scarf from Littlewoods. White plastic sunshade from Lillywhites.

Simply Natural

19 magazine, 1970s, Antiquarius, chelsea cobbler, Essenses, hand tinting, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, james wedge, Sacha, stirling cooper, Vintage Editorials, wigs

Long cardigans, long skirts, long scarves add up to a rustic setting in a relaxed mood. A casual look forward to restful autumn days.

Photographed by James Wedge.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1973

Maroon hat with turn up front. Matching sweater in maroon and camel, with plain camel collar. Brown pencil skirt with pleats at the side. All by Stirling Cooper. Cream tights by Mary Quant. Beige and brown leather bootees from Chelsea Cobbler. Long knitted scarf by Herbert Johnson. Wig in all pictures from Wigwham.
Camel sweater with red and blue Fair Isle pattern. Brown wool tweed mixture cardigan with cream and maroon trim. Brown pencil skirt. All by Stirling Cooper. Knitted scarf from Herbert Johnson.
All clothes by Stirling Cooper. Brown bootees from Chelsea Cobbler. Gloves from Ambalu. Scarf by Herbert Johnson.
All clothes by Stirling Cooper. Boots by Chelsea Cobbler. Scarf by Herbert Johnson.
Clothes by Stirling Cooper. Shoes from Sacha. Scarf from Essences at Antiquarius. Cane from Emmerton and Lambert.
Clothes by Stirling Cooper. Suede sandals by Baby Shoes. Scarf from Essences at Antiquarius.

What pinafores did next

1970s, anello and davide, Angela at London Town, duc, Gina Fratini, Ginger Group, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, kensington market, kurt geiger, Marielle, mary quant, miss selfridge, Moya Bowler, Titfers, Vintage Editorials, Vogue
Cotton print pinafore over a sweet flowered dress. Deep ruffles on shoulders and a big beautiful bonnet to match. By Titfers at Miss Selfridge. Red button shoes at Anello & Davide.

Long dresses and skirts in crepe and cotton prints – related to others just as small, fresh, sharp or soft, on pinafore smocks and aprons. These are not so much to keep you clean, more to make you look prettier; and you can be dairy maids, kitchen maids, Kate Greenaway girls all through summer.

And so began the kickback against all things clean, crisp and space age…

Photographed by Duc.

Scanned from Vogue, April 1971.

Fine floppy fluted crepe de chine dress by Marielle. Liberty lawn pinafore by Angela at London Town. Brown boots by Moya Bowler for Edouard Jerrold at Kurt Geiger.
Dairy cream cotton smock dress. Leg o’mutton sleeves, buttons up the back, print of wild pale roses and primrose ribbons. Gauzy white pinafore, lace and rose pink ribbons. Both by Gina Fratini. Shoes at Anello & Davide. Lacy pink silk bonnet at Sharon’s Shoppe, Kensington Market.
Cotton and rayon wrap, two sizes of polka dot, white on cherry red patches. By Mary Quant Ginger Group. Cherry and red stripe cotton apron by In Pressler. Natural straw hat at Herbert Johnson.

The Seven Faces of Beauty

1970s, barry lategan, beauty, Gina Fratini, Hair and make-up, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, Make-up, Sujon, Vintage Adverts, Vivienne Lynn, Vogue
Monday’s Child is Fair of Face. Blue flowers from Novelty Imports. Blue silk blouse by Sujon.

A stunningly styled and photographed advertisement feature for Boots No7 cosmetics, based around the ‘Monday’s Child’ nursery rhyme (although they’ve muddled up Friday and Saturday as far as I remember it). As a Tuesday’s child, I’m pretty happy with my lot although never sure how graceful I am. Which one are you? I particularly love Vivienne Lynn’s mournful Wednesday’s Child.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned from Vogue, June 1972.

Tuesday’s Child is Full of Grace. Pink voile blouse by Plainclothes. Hat by Herbert Johnson.
Wednesday’s Child is Full of Woe.
Thursday’s Child has Far to Go
Friday’s Child works hard for her living.
Saturday’s Child is Loving and Giving.
And the child that is born on the Sabbath Day is Bonny and Blithe, Good and Gay. White smock top by Gina Fratini.

Go Gaucho!

1970s, anello and davide, Battle Of The Little Big Horn, Beged'Or, Bellini, Bermona, caroline baker, Feathers, Fifth Avenue, Friitala, Harri Peccinotti, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, Janet Ibbotson, levis, Lizzie Carr, Mexicana, nova magazine, Pourelle, Sacha, Vintage Editorials
Striped woollen poncho skirt by Beatrice Bellini for WHI. Chamois lace-up blouse by Janet Ibbotson. Lace up suede boots by Anello and Davide. Leather and bead necklace by Feathers.

Not only does leather feel good, it smells delicious, like a trip out West. Suede and chamois are even better than leather because they are so much softer and easier tow ear. They’re not as expensive as they used to be. Cheap they will never be if you want value for your money. Leather, properly looked after, lasts for age; in fact, the more beaten up and old it looks the better. So when it comes to buying remember that and invest in something safe – like the clothes photographed on these pages. Thy are not desperately in fashion but, on the other hand, they are not out and never will be…

Fashion by Caroline Baker. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from Nova, October 1970.

Midi pigskin wrarpover skirt and long fitted jacket both by Beged’Or. Lace up suede boots from Anello and Davide.
Suede midi waistcoat and pants by Friitala. Brown wool shirt at Feathers. Leather and bead necklace at Feathers. Felt hat by Bermona. Stripey belts at Herbert Johnson.
Leather and rabbit midi waistcoat by Skinflair. Handwoven cotton blouse from Fifth Avenue. Flared blue jeans by Levis.
Suede jeans by Newman at Spotlight. Argentinian wool poncho – similar available at Mexicana and at Inti. Cow print velour hat by Bermona. Patent boots from Sacha.
Chamois fringed midi dress and beaded headband both at Battle Of The Little Big Horn.
Suede lace up dress to order at Pourelle. Poncho by Village Squares. Boots by Anello and Davide.
Fake snake velvet jeans by Newman at Feathers. Silk satin snake shirt to order at Lizzie Carr. Woven sash belts at Herbert Johnson.


Red, white and you

19 magazine, 1970s, biba, bus stop, chelsea cobbler, Crochetta, harold ingram, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, John Craig, Karl Stoecker, Lizzie Carr, mr freedom, sheridan barnett, simon massey, stirling cooper, Sujon, Titfers, Vintage Editorials

red white and you 2

Red and white striped halter neck sweater by Crochetta. Black cotton pants by Sujon. Shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Red leather belt from Bus Stop.

Relax in these beautiful cruise clothes. Wear your white baggy pants with red and white striped tops, cotton berets or little ‘Forties’ pull on hats. Wear white leather shoes with bows or ruched fronts and high heels. White pearls and bangles look just right this summer. This is the year of the female female, so start purring…

Photographed by Karl Stoecker

Scanned from 19 Magazine, April 1971.

red white and you 1

Red and white striped beret by Titfers. Halter neck wool sweater by Stirling Cooper. White cotton suit by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. White leather shoes from Biba. / White cotton beret by Titfers. Cotton windcheater by Lizzie Carr for Plain Clothes. White trousers by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. Striped socks by Mr Freedom. White leather shoes from Biba.

red white and you 3

White sailor hat by Titfers. Red and white striped halter neck and Oxford bags all in one by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. White leather shoes by Biba.

red white and you 7

White cotton hat by Herbert Johnson. White acrylic sweater by Harold Ingram. Blue palm tree with white lady and black tree print jacket by Stirling Cooper. White cotton bags by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. White leather sandals by Biba.

red white and you 5

White cotton beret by Titfers. Red cotton shirt, red and white cotton blazer and white cotton bags all by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. Red leather sandals by Chelsea Cobbler.

red white and you 6

White straw hat by Herbert Johnson. Navy acrylic singlet by John Craig. White cotton bags by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. White leather shoes from Biba.

red white and you 8

White hat by Herbert Johnson. White cotton suit, top trimmed in tartan, huge wide clown pants by Sujon. White leather shoes by Biba. Red and white scarf from Herbert Johnson.

red white and you 4

White angora sweater by Crochetta. White cotton bags by Sheridan Barnett for Simon Massey. Red leather shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Headscarf by Herbert Johnson.

Where have all the flowers gone?

1970s, Adrian Mann, Bermona, biba, crowthers, florrie carr, Herbert Johnson, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, ossie clark, Richard Selby, Sacha, Sacha, Vintage Editorials

where have all the flowers gone 1

Blooming red peonies on a navy rayon georgette dress, Florrie Carr. Flower trimmed straw hat, Crowthers. Shoes, Sacha. Rose print crêpe de chine dress, Crowthers. Straw hat, Bermona. Shoes, Sacha.

…To the seaside, where they’re blossoming out all over flimsy crêpe de chine summer dresses. So, if like most of us, you’re searching the shops for cool holiday clothes, now is the time to take your pick from our bunch.

Photographed by Richard Selby.

Scanned from Honey, August 1971

where have all the flowers gone 3

Fruit and flower crêpe de chine dress, Crowthers. Orange suede cork soled shoes, Sacha. Pastel tulip printed crêpe de chine skirt and matching blouse, Crowthers. Criss cross suede shoes, Crowthers. Plastic and raffia choker, Adrien Mann.

where have all the flowers gone 2

Swirling sunflower print dress in cinnamon and cream, Biba. White raffia sunhat, Herbert Johnson. Blue and white daisy patterned crêpe de chine dress, Ossie Clark for Radley. Burgundy straw hat, Biba.