Anarchists go their own sweet way

alice pollock, beauty, biba, gala, Hair and make-up, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Jill Harley, kari ann muller, Make-up, Steve Hiett

They break boring beauty traditions and riot lip colours go on eyes, eye colours go on lips. Upside down- Quite contrary. And why not? Make-up was getting so dreary. We just stuck to the rules and slicked warm colours—pink, amber, soft orange—on our mouths, and cool colours—grey, green, blue, brown—on our eyes. Till now. Till the anarchists started this new groove. Now things are happening. Putting on a face isn’t a daily chore to be done as quickly as possible. Make-up is something to enjoy. It’s art. Total fun. Total fantasy. After all, painting on warm mobile skin is so much more exciting than .cold fiat paper or canvas. Come, join the anarchy party and experiment with colour. Sit down this evening in front of a well-lit mirror, not the telly, and design surprise eyes.

Alice Pollock (top) says she would like to be invisible (can’t think why) and her favourite perfume is Chanel No. 5. She has tried every hair colour under the sun, including green, but she’s glad it’s her own shade now—”At least I know who I am when I wake up.” Every morning she washes it in the bath with Boots Herbal Shampoo, 2s. 11d. On her eye-lids she paints Leichner’s Ivory Stick No. 5, 5s. 3d., and then an arc of pale green under the brow and round along the cheek-bone. Her lip-colour is a mixture of the same Leichner stick and Christian Dior’s Sepia 61 lipstick, 15s.


Moon (centre left, whose real name is Constance Mullens and who was nicknamed after a South African cartoon character called Moon Mullens) wears Mary Quant’s Citrus Jeepers Peepers, 18s. 7d., on her eye-lids and a purple Caran D’ache water crayon all round the eyes to tone with her hair which is cleverly coloured mauve and butterscotch by Erik and styled by Herta at Vidal Sassoon, Grosvenor House; 01-629 2463. Her favourite perfume is jasmin and, asked what the most vital beauty product is, she said, “a razor.”


Gala Mitchell (centre right) is a beautifully original actress. You may have seen her before in Ken Russell’s television film about the Pre-Raphaelites. Her most treasured beauty product is lipstick. Here she’s wearing Biba’s purple lip-tint, 5s., with black liner round her mouth. She uses more of Revlon’s Natural Wonder Lid Liners, 17s. 6d., to paint intriguing black spots across part of her face to symbolise a veil, and then twists a string of blue curls, tinted by Erik, amongst her copper hair which she keeps in place with two ’40s tortoiseshell hair-combs.


Kari Ann Moller (bottom left) says she wants to look like the wicked witch in fairy tales, yet she loves cosy perfumes like Apple Blossom and Lily of the Valley (Coty’s Muguet des Bois Creamy Skin Parfum, 17s. 6d.), and she couldn’t live without Nivea. “I found an old purple crayon in my boyfriend’s car—he’s a painter—so I’m wearing purple with a dab of lipstick and Leichner silver sparklers on my eyes today, plus tart red lipstick by Elizabeth Arden.” Her soft ginger wig is by Ricci Burns, 151 Kings Rd., S.W.3.


Jill Harley (bottom right) never wears fake eyelashes now, she’s only interested in colour: Chrome stick by Leichner.. 5s. 3d., with Gait orange paint near the socket line and Dorothy Gray’s Light-Up Yellow lipstick, 11s. 6d., as a highlighter for her eyes. Woltz ltaliana’s pale green polish, Laguna, goes on her nails to match up with her pale green wellingtons. Instead of expensive face-shapers, she brushes on Miners’ Frosted Brown Powder Eye Shadow, 2s. 10d. For her lips, she mixes an old red lipstick with Boots 17 Shiny Brown Eye Shadow Stick, 2s. 6d.

Two of my favourite models + one of my favourite designers + some wild 1970 make-up = happy Liz.

Photographed by Steve Hiett.

Scanned from Honey, September 1970.

Inspirational Editorials: British Birds

1960s, british boutique movement, bus stop, Concept, Downtown, gordon king, Honey Magazine, Inspirational Images, Jill Harley, kari ann muller, lee bender, monty coles

Crepe zipper upper dress with patent belt by Gordon King. Jersey trousers by Concept. Patent high-tongue shoes by Ronald Keith. Hearts and flower power satin top by Downtown. Red cotton trousers by Slimma.

Crepe zipper upper dress with patent belt by Gordon King. Jersey trousers by Concept. Patent high-tongue shoes by Ronald Keith. Hearts and flower power satin top by Downtown. Red cotton trousers by Slimma.

British Birds hip it, add ribbon round foreheads squaw-style, and dress-over-pants. Slip into pull-on jersey dresses over matching tights and way out shoes. Hair a-fuzz, English looks are a-buzz with interest…

Photographed by Monty Coles.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, April 1969.

Slinky little print wrapover by Bus Stop. Jersey pants by Concept.

Slinky little print wrapover by Bus Stop. Jersey pants by Concept.

Vest dress in jersey by Gordon King. Peasant shirt smock in jersey by Gordon King. Jersey trousers by Concept.

Vest dress in jersey by Gordon King. Peasant shirt smock in jersey by Gordon King. Jersey trousers by Concept.

Inspirational Images: Hollywood Revamped

1970s, british boutique movement, christopher mcdonnell, cosmopolitan, George Malyard, Inspirational Images, kari ann muller, marrian mcdonnell, platforms, richard imrie, terry de havilland

Terry de Havilland Christopher McDonnell Cosmopolitan May 1972 Richard Imrie

Christopher McDonnell must dream in black and white, and all his dreams must star Ginger Rogers and Rita Hayworth. Because, when it comes to designing clothes, this twenty-eight year old ex-Royal College of Art designer is the very spirit of Hollywood: his clothes have backless bodices, necklines to the navel and skirts that grip the bottom and then flare in Busby Berkley pleats. His model girls, smiling jammily through their bright lips, false eyelashes and heaving curls, snap along on platform soles. One of today’s top stars, Anouk Aimée, is his favourite customer. Here, model Kari-Ann wears black taffeta top and pleated dotted culottes by Christopher McDonnell, £35. Hat by George Malyard. Shoes by Terry de Havilland, exclusive to Marrian McDonnell.

Photographed by Richard Imrie.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, May 1972.

Inspirational Images: Party Stuff

19 magazine, 1960s, Inspirational Images, kari ann muller, space age, Tim Street-Porter

"19's Guide to Entertaining"

“19’s Guide to Entertaining”

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19, April 1969

Inspirational Images: Clothes to get you back in his arms

1970s, Barbara Trentham, british boutique movement, chelsea cobbler, cosmopolitan, Deirdre McSharry, Early Bird, harold ingram, Inspirational Images, jean muir, kari ann muller, mary quant, medusa, norman eales, paulene stone, stirling cooper, Tsaritsa, Vintage Editorials

Barbara wears halter top and pleated skirt by Mary Quant, £23 for the rigout, and shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. He wears intarsia sweater by Ballantyne.

Nice girls are turning a cold shoulder on some of the best looking men around. Perfectly enchanting girls, like Twiggy, who flashes her famous shoulder blades at Christopher Gable through her sleeveless, backless The Boy Friend costumes. And who can forget Lauren Bacall and lngrid Bergman acting with their backs turned on Bogie in all those Late Late Show films. Now you can make some of the best exit lines in the backless—and fairly frontless—cIothes previewed here. lt’s clear that fashion is on the side of the female female in clothes that show off a nice warm back and allow plenty of MANoeuvring room. Putting the Back-to-Basics through their paces in many of the pictures are Barbara Trentham and Gary Myers, a couple of Cosmo people to watch. Blonde, brainy Barbara with the 1,000-watt smile will soon be seen in her first film, opposite Shirley MacLaine. called, if you can believe it, The Possession of Joel Delaney, and Aussie Gary is tall, dark and one of television’s busiest tough guys. Together they show that a cold shoulder never turned a good man off…

Scanned from the very first UK edition of Cosmopolitan, March 1972. Photographs by Norman Eales.

Paulene wears chamois leather blouse and pleated skirt by Jean Muir, £46 and £31.50

Paulene Stone in a robe from Browns, £20

Barbara wears dress by Early Bird, £7. Gary’s sweater is by Harold Ingram, £3.30

Barbara wears dress by Mary Quant, £15

Barbara wears strappy crepe dress by Medusa, £9.95

Barbara wears dress by Tsaritsa, £29. Shoes by Mary Quant.

When both ladies turn up in identical tank tops scooped low, a man scarcely knows where to put his eyes. Dark Janni and tawny Kari-Anne [sic] fill out backless sweaters by Stirling Cooper, £2.95. Janni’s red jersey trousers are £9.60, also by Stirling Cooper. Yellow satin jeans by Medusa, £17.91.

A Musical Break: Bryan Ferry – You Go to My Head

1970s, antony price, bryan ferry, kari ann muller, Music

Because he’s Bryan Ferry and because he always seems to soothe me when I’m frazzled. I also love that Kari-Ann Muller is the girl in this video, seeing as how she’s the original Roxy Girl (note the original album cover framed on the wall behind her)… Schmoooooooth.

An open letter to Bryan Ferry

amanda lear, bryan ferry, jerry hall, kari ann muller, kate moss, marilyn cole, roxy music

Dear Mr Ferry,

There seems to be some sort of immense cock-up, re. your new album. Those wags at the record company appear to have placed something called ‘Kate Moss’ on the front cover. How strange! How careless! Perhaps they need a little reminder of what a Roxy cover girl should really be like.

How kind of you to take the blame for them, by saying it was all your own idea. You’re such a gentleman. Although a little foolish, for who could believe that the BryanGod would ever deem Kate Moss to be a suitable Roxy girl?

You see, the big problem is that I wish to purchase your [surely] superb new piece of work, but I have an allergic reaction to Moss and cannot, therefore, get within a mile of it without breaking out in a rash. What a dilemma! What a pickle!

I look forward to purchasing from you again in the future, when sanity has been restored.

Yours faithfully,

Miss Peelpants