Go Gaucho!

1970s, anello and davide, Battle Of The Little Big Horn, Beged'Or, Bellini, Bermona, caroline baker, Feathers, Fifth Avenue, Friitala, Harri Peccinotti, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, Janet Ibbotson, levis, Lizzie Carr, Mexicana, nova magazine, Pourelle, Sacha, Vintage Editorials
Striped woollen poncho skirt by Beatrice Bellini for WHI. Chamois lace-up blouse by Janet Ibbotson. Lace up suede boots by Anello and Davide. Leather and bead necklace by Feathers.

Not only does leather feel good, it smells delicious, like a trip out West. Suede and chamois are even better than leather because they are so much softer and easier tow ear. They’re not as expensive as they used to be. Cheap they will never be if you want value for your money. Leather, properly looked after, lasts for age; in fact, the more beaten up and old it looks the better. So when it comes to buying remember that and invest in something safe – like the clothes photographed on these pages. Thy are not desperately in fashion but, on the other hand, they are not out and never will be…

Fashion by Caroline Baker. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from Nova, October 1970.

Midi pigskin wrarpover skirt and long fitted jacket both by Beged’Or. Lace up suede boots from Anello and Davide.
Suede midi waistcoat and pants by Friitala. Brown wool shirt at Feathers. Leather and bead necklace at Feathers. Felt hat by Bermona. Stripey belts at Herbert Johnson.
Leather and rabbit midi waistcoat by Skinflair. Handwoven cotton blouse from Fifth Avenue. Flared blue jeans by Levis.
Suede jeans by Newman at Spotlight. Argentinian wool poncho – similar available at Mexicana and at Inti. Cow print velour hat by Bermona. Patent boots from Sacha.
Chamois fringed midi dress and beaded headband both at Battle Of The Little Big Horn.
Suede lace up dress to order at Pourelle. Poncho by Village Squares. Boots by Anello and Davide.
Fake snake velvet jeans by Newman at Feathers. Silk satin snake shirt to order at Lizzie Carr. Woven sash belts at Herbert Johnson.


Satin Goes To Blazers

19 magazine, 1970s, Angela at London Town, Ann Reeves, biba, bus stop, Copper Coin, crowthers, hard rock cafe, Harri Peccinotti, Hope and Eleanor, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, lee bender, mr freedom, Ronnie Stirling, sheridan barnett, stirling cooper, Titfers, Vintage Editorials

gone to blazers 1

Purple satin blouse by Ann Reeves. Green satin jacket and matching green satin Oxford bags both by Sheridan Barnett for Copper Coin. Belt from Bus Stop. Rainbow brooch by Cash Graphics.

The original St Laurent satin blazer would cost you around £50, but otherwise they are available from about £10 and probably only you will know the difference. The best ones are from Bus Stop… very Joan Crawford, complete with ‘Forties’ shoulder pads. One thing’s for sure… you must have at least one in your wardrobe. They look particularly good worn over jeans and T-shirts, but if you want to look smart, wear them with matching trousers, a skirt, or over a printed dress.

Dreamy editorial which uses the brand spanking new Hard Rock Cafe on Park Lane in London as its backdrop.

Opened on 14th June 1971, by Isaac Tigrett and Peter Morton, its original decor was less memorabilia, more American-diner-transported-to-London. Sensing a gap in the market for musicians playing in London but unable to get a decent burger etc, within a decade they were expanding into the international chain it is now. The original is the only one I’ve ever visited, and it maintains a lot of its authentic charm – as long as you avoid the busy times. Oh how I wish I could time travel back to this era though.

This isn’t the first HRC-based photoshoot I have scanned, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. Its authentic-feeling interiors, much like Brighton’s seafront, seemed to lure photographers and models like moths to a flame.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, September 1971.

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Crepe shirt by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Jade green satin blazer with black check (has matching pleated skirt not shown) from Mr Freedom. Panda brooch from Susan Marsh, Chelsea Antique Market.

gone to blazers 3

Blue denim hat by Titfers. Yellow satin blouse by Jeff Banks. Green satin jacket with red buttons by Sheridan Barnett for Copper Coin. Elvis brooch by Cash Graphics. Parrot brooch from a selection at Hope and Eleanor.

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Long sleeved white satin blouse with bow at neck by Ann Reeves. Single breasted red and white striped blazer by Angela at London Town. Sunglasses from Biba. Hand brooch from Hope and Eleanor.

gone to blazers 5

Blue and red printed rayon crepe dress and blue satin blazer with red buttons, both by Lee Bender at Bus Stop.

gone to blazers 6

Black rayon shirt with floral print and tie belt. Black satin double breasted blazer with self buttons and padded shoulders, both by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Aeroplane brooch from Cash Graphics.

gone to blazers 7

Red and white spotted cotton button through dress by Lee Bender for Bus Stop. Royal blue satin blazer from Crowthers.

gone to blazers 8

Red cotton hat from Titfers. Long sleeved white rayon blouse with sail boat print by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Double breasted blue satin blazer with red buttons by Sheridan Barnett for Copper Coin. Sunglasses from Biba.

Day Trippers

19 magazine, 1970s, biba, Bilbo, Chelsea Antiques Market, gordon king, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, jeff banks, Malcolm McLaren, miss mouse, quorum, rae spencer cullen, Sex, sheridan barnett, stirling cooper, strawberry studio, terry de havilland, Uncategorized, Vintage Editorials, Vivienne Lynn, vivienne westwood

day trippers - peccinotti - 1

White dress with music and rose print by Miss Mouse. Snakeskin shoes from Bilbo. Red and white spotted dress with white trimming by Miss Mouse.

Photographed in Singapore by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, May 1975.

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Black and green floral print halterneck dress from Biba. Black and gold shoes by Sex. Green floral halterneck dress by Biba. Black and gold brocade shoes by Biba.

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Shocking pink pintucked cotton dress by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum. Black snakeskin shoes by Bilbo. Red cotton sack dress with hip pockets by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum. Red suede and snakeskin shoes by Terry de Havilland.

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Dusty pink sun dress with black piping by Strawberry Studio. Grey suede shoes by Terry de Havilland.

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Blue cotton dress with Dorchester motif. Coffee dress with Savoy motif, both by Jeff Banks.

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White cotton culotte dress by Stirling Cooper. White shoes from Secondhand Rose, Chelsea Antique Market. White cotton sun dress by Stirling Cooper. White shoes from Secondhand Rose.

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Navy cotton sundress with cross over straps by Gordon King.

Christmas Wrapping

19 magazine, 1970s, Albini, biba, bus stop, Derber, erica budd, gillian richard, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, miss mouse, quorum, ravel, Richard Green, universal witness, Vintage Editorials, zapata

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 3

Long silver, gold and blue taffeta dress with huge puff sleeves nd ruched bodice, £22. Blue leather court shoes on high platforms and very high heels, £7.45. Blue shot lurex chiffon scarf, 20p. All from Biba.

Unwrapping Christmas presents can cause thrills of excitement or groans of despair but, whatever you find inside, the sense of occasion is always there. We’ve proved our sense of occasion by wrapping up the best Christmas clothes for your parties; showing off the lovely, sexy, lurex, satins and natty netting you’ll be adorning yourself with this party season. Glamour and glitter are here to stay, so wrap yourself up in our Christmas wrapping and you’ll be the best Christmas present anyone’s had this year!

I can only hope in vain that I will find boxes of Biba and Miss Mouse under my Christmas tree, but still it’s a nice fantasy to have! As always, a deliciously quirky concept by Mr Peccinotti and 19’s usual flawless taste in clothes…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1972.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 1

LEFT: Black satin elasticated tube sweater, covered in stretch netting, £7. Matching black skirt with silver braid and silver spots, £10-50. Both by Miss Mouse. Green tights, from Biba, 30p. Black suede shoes with silver snake-skin trim on heel and toe, from Derber, £13-99. Lurex shot chiffon scarf, 20p. Tiny fake diamond rings, 5p. each. Both from Biba. Green glass bead bracelet, by Paul Stephens, 25p. RIGHT: Black satin heart-shaped strapless top, with gold and silver spots in lurex. Matching Oxford bags. Both by Miss Mouse, £20 the set. Silver shoes with very high heels, by Zapata, £15.75. Red shot lurex scarf, 20p. Red stud ear- rings with gold flecks, 20p. Matching bracelets, £1.20 each. All from Biba.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 2

Black jersey dress with silver lurex spotted top and inset pleats has long sleeves, by Gillian Richard, £8.20. Silver lurex tights, by Mary Ouant. £1-50. Black suede shoes with silver snake-skin print, from Derber, £13.99. Diamante choker, by Paul Stephens, 40p. Black wool halter-neck top spotted with silver lurex and with silver straps, by Erica Budd, £3.60. Black satin ankle-length skirt, from Bus Stop, £5.95. Silver lurex tights, by Mary Quant, £1.50. Silver metallic leather shoes, from Ravel, £10-50. Long silver lurex gloves, by Morley, £2.15. Diamante choker, by Paul Stephens, 40p. Diamante heart earrings, from Biba, £1.15.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 4

LEFT: Silver and grey knitted lurex long-sleeved polo-neck sweater, £3.50. Silver lurex cardigan with grey rose and two pockets, £9.95. Both from Bus Stop. Long grey satin skirt, by Walter Albini from Browns, £6.30. Tights by Mary Quant. £1.50. Platform sandals. from Ravel, £10.50. Bracelets. from Fenwick, 90p. each. Diamante and pearl-drop earrings, by Paul Stephens, £1.20. RIGHT: Long silver lurex halter-neck dress with silver and black lurex wavy trim on heart-shaped neck and side pleat inset. by Gillian Richard. £9.50. Matching cardigan with wavy-trim pockets. by Richard Green. £6.80. Silver lurex tights, by Mary Quant. £1.50. Silver metallic leather shoes. with platform soles and peep-toes, from Ravel, £10.50. Diamante drop earrings. by Paul Stephens. £1.10. Silver and black halter-neck lurex top, which buttons at front of waist, £5. Matching ankle-length wavy-print skirt, £8.60. Both by Richard Green. Black suede shoes with snakeskin print, from Derber, £1399. Long black satin gloves, by F. G. Shave, £2.75. Diamante bracelets. £1 each. Drop earrings. £1. Both by Paul Stephens.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 5

Green, gold and black lurex georgette shirt with long dolman sleeves and trimmed in black satin on v-neck and cuffs, £11. Long black satin skirt, £9.50. Both from Universal Witness. Green tights, from Biba, 30p. Silver court shoes with very high heel, and ankle strap, by Zapata, £15.75. Black and silver necklace. £2.90. Diamante stud earrings, £1. Both by Paul Stephens.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 6

Black and silver fine-striped lurex halter-neck sweater, with matching striped cardigan, by McCaul, £8 the set. Black satin trousers with turn-ups and high waist, by Richard Green, £7.70. Silver tights, by Mary Quant, £1.50. Black suede shoes with silver and red ‘snakeskin’ print and silver ankle-straps, by Leicester Shoes. £15.95. Thin diamante belt. £7.50. Single row diamante bracelet, £1. Both by Paul Stephens. Dangling diamante earrings. from Biba, 60p.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 7

Cream crepe shirt with long puff sleeves, £4.50. Matching tunic with green satin piping on short sleeves and green, yellow and cream sequin motif, £1850. Green satin trousers, £10. All by Quorum. Gold leather shoes with gold snakeskin print, from Derber, £13.99. Green lurex bow tie to make from remnants.

Just Crazy

19 magazine, 1970s, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, John Dove and Molly White, Uncategorized, Vintage Editorials, Wonder Workshop

Just Crazy - 19 Magazine - Peccinotti - 2

Sweaters with Elvis, Don’t Be Cruel and Wild Thing on front. All by John and Molly Dove.

Rock around the clock in clinging cire singlets or stomp a bit in boppy beatnik sweaters, add some lurex or fishnet tights and you’re all set to swing.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, April 1972.

Just Crazy - 19 Magazine - Peccinotti - 1

Black cire singlet with pink leopard skin heart. Cire t-shirts with Marilyn Monroe and notes motifs. All by John and Molly Dove.

Happily Ever After

1970s, alistair cowin, Buckle Under, charles jourdan, Elliott, erica budd, Foale and Tuffin, gladrags, Guy Humphries, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, kurt geiger, mary quant, Michael Foreman, mr freedom, pablo and delia, Sacha, shape, stirling cooper, terry de havilland, thea porter, vanity fair, Vintage Editorials, zandra rhodes

happily-ever-after-2

White lawn dress printed with butterflies and flowers by Thea Porter. Straw hat by Buckle Under. Red wedge shoes by Kurt Geiger. Belt by Shape.

There’s a good reason why Vanity Fair is possibly my favourite magazine of this period. They were relatively conventional in the 1960s, and would ‘merge’ with Honey magazine around 1972, but in their death knells they were just about the most innovative magazine in the UK. Issues were often themed around ‘issues’, for example this one is entirely themed around break-ups and divorces (including a story on what a divorced man should wear when taking his kid out for the day).

Nor did they shy away from more expensive designer names, such as Thea Porter and Zandra Rhodes here, mixing them happily with the more affordable but still iconic boutique names like Stirling Cooper and Mr Freedom. Adding Foale and Tuffin, Pablo and Delia and Terry de Havilland into the mix for good measure, and all those stunning illustrations by Michael Foreman… this is one of my favourite editorials of all time.

Vanity Fair is also, frankly, a nightmare to scan because it falls apart at the binding with the lightest touch, which is why I don’t scan them as often. So enjoy the heaven of Harri Peccinotti’s work while I gently shuffle all the pages back into the magazine…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Illustrations by Michael Foreman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1971.

happily-ever-after-1

Long grey crepe dress patterned with purple, green and red birds by Shape. Pablo and Delia suede thong necklace. Blue suede shoes at Sacha.

happily-ever-after-3

Beige suede skirt with applique shapes and matching shawl by Mary Quant. Necklace from Buckle Under. Beige suede boots by Guy Humphries.

happily-ever-after-4

Blue and white feather printed chiffon dress by Zandra Rhodes.

happily-ever-after-5

Left to right: Chiffon blouse and multi-coloured skirt by Foale and Tuffin. Painted rainbow shoes from Mr Freedom. Painted belt by Shape. // Cream and red jersey catsuit (top only showing) and banded red and cream skirt both from Stirling Cooper. Red shoes by Kurt Geiger. // Cream, yellow and red jersey dress by Stirling Cooper. Pull on hat by Janice Peskett. // Red cotton t-shirt by Erica Budd. Cream dungarees from Stirling Cooper. Red python sandals at Elliotts.

happily-ever-after-6

Above: Mauve satin cotton pinafore dress and blouse by Gladrags. Right: Bottom half of Alistair Cowin calico trousers with green printing. Green and yellow shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Black velvet dungarees with white satin applique heart from Mr Freedom. Chiffon blouse from Foale and Tuffin. Mauve canvas boots at Charles Jourdan.

Inspirational Editorials: Legs Go Under Cover

1960s, british boutique movement, Browns, celia birtwell, chelsea cobbler, Flora Boutique, fulham road clothes shop, Gina Fratini, Harpers Bazaar, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, Ken Lane, kurt geiger, molly parkin, mr fish, ossie clark, Piero de Monzi, quorum, sylvia ayton, thea porter, Vintage Editorials, zandra rhodes

Left to right: White crepe bolero and trousers by Gina Fratini. White shoes by Kurt Geiger / Satin trousers and matching chiffon top in print by Celia Birtwell, both by Ossie Clark at Quorum. Red leather shoes by Chrystal of Copenhagen. / Black silk organza shirt and trousers in Bianchini's black silk organza flocked with velvet, both from Thea Porter. Cord belt from Piero de Monzi. Wide jewelled belt and double chain and green stone belt from Ken Lane. Black satin shoes by Kirt Geiger. / Black cire trouser suit from The Fulham Road Clothes Shop. Black letaher boots by Thea Chelsea Cobbler. Black and cream silk scarf from Thea Porter

Left to right: White crepe bolero and trousers by Gina Fratini. White shoes by Kurt Geiger / Satin trousers and matching chiffon top in print by Celia Birtwell, both by Ossie Clark at Quorum. Red leather shoes by Chrystal of Copenhagen. / Black silk organza shirt and trousers in Bianchini’s black silk organza flocked with velvet, both from Thea Porter. Cord belt from Piero de Monzi. Wide jewelled belt and double chain and green stone belt from Ken Lane. Black satin shoes by Kirt Geiger. / Black cire trouser suit from The Fulham Road Clothes Shop. Black leather boots by The Chelsea Cobbler. Black and cream silk scarf from Thea Porter

Everyone is tired of hearing that the mini skirt is on the way out.
Nearly as tired as when they heard it was on the way in.
These things in fashion die a very slow death,
but in this case one reason has been the lack of alternative.
Designers made too great a leap with the maxi,
and too indefinite a move with the midi.
After extremely short skirts,
something flapping around mid calves did feel extremely frumpish.
This was tied in with the fact that no boot manufacturers at
that time were making them with high enough heels,
essential with a longer skirt,
and it was very difficult to find feminine unclumpy
shoes which gave enough of a lift.
Now footwear is changing.
Boots are tall and beautifully fitting.
l-ligh-heeled shoes — very high — are pretty,
well proportioned and extremely flattering.
And so one branch of fashion may well be influencing another.
ln the end everything is a matter of proportions.
When skirts went up, heels came down.
The high stilettos we used to hobble around in so painfully,
not really that long ago,
looked far too tarty with hemlines halfway up the thigh and even
worse with trousers, especially tight ones.
Since most women feel their legs to be too short,
and the wearing of the heel as very necessary to a feeling of femininity,
this cancelled out the wearing of trousers for a very large number.
Until a short time ago trousers were being worn by,.
apart from men of course,
women who looked like men — that is, girls with no curves.
Lean hips. Long legs — in flat shoes.
Now for the first time comes the alternative to the mini skirt. Trousers.
That is, until hemlines decide exactly how far they will drop.
As drop they will.
Footwear has helped provide the solution.
It will comfort many to know that the models in the
pictures which follow, averaging 32″-35″ hips, still have
to choose, very carefully, shapes which suit them.
Their legs are long but still need the added inches that a high
heel gives them. Their shapes are slim, but female.
Still sometimes round enough to need the camouflage of a long jacket,
cardigan or tunic. They show that closely fitting
trousers can be sexier and will also make you look fatter.
They show that a small waist is made smaller by a high
cut rather than a hipster style.
Most of the trousers for evening lit well over the hips but flare out
in a very feminine, flattering way.
They are glittery, shiny, and see-through.
Beautiful in fact; better than ever before.

Alas, now that mini skirts are accepted just about everywhere.
we have to warn that trousers, for women that is, aren’t.
An appalling number of top London hotels
still hold fast to outdated rules about them.
Officially they are not allowed in, even to drink,
let alone to dine or to have lunch.
ln the Dorchester they can’t even have tea!
In the Mirabelle: Ofhcially, trousers are not admitted.
The question does not arise much at lunch—tirne
as there are never very many women there.
ln the evening the rule has now been relaxed and you
would be permitted to dine in trousers.
Talk of the Town: Certainly you may wear trousers.
Savoy: They now allow very dressy evening trousers in public rooms
but no daytime trousers at all.
Wearing them to private functions in private rooms
is left to the discretion of the organisers.
Dorchester: You would not be served anything
when wearing a trouser suit.
This applies to all public rooms,
but for banquets and other private functions it is up to the organisers.
Connaught: Officially not allowed at any time in the bar or restaurant,
but it is a decision left to the manager.
Carlton Tower: Trousers are not encouraged in the Rib or
Chelsea Rooms, but they are coming to accept them.
They prefer lunch-time trousers to evening ones.
Westbury: Trousers are not allowed in the bar or restaurant;
this applies to evenings too.
However, this rule, like others, is relaxed from time to time,
eg, when Brigitte Bardot arrives in trousers from the
airport – or Lord Snowdon arrives for dinner in a roll-neck shirt.
Hilton: Officially no trouser suits in the Roof Restaurant.
Unofficially you could get away with it if it’s
a very beautiful catsuit or something similar.
At private functions it depends on the organisers.
Ritz: No rule for the daytime, it just depends on the trousers!
Usually it is permitted to wear trousers
in the evening, but again it depends . . .
Claridge’s: Very strict,
definitely no trouser suits in the public rooms,
though they say you can wear what you like in private!
Crockford’s: They don’t object to them at all.
Coq d’Or: They much prefer to see a lady dressed as a lady.
During the day they prefer skirts
but don’t object to trousers in the evening at all.
White Tower: lf the woman looks elegant and well-dressed she is let in,
otherwise she may be told that the restaurant is full.
Brown’s: No objections at all for either day or evening
in either restaurant or bar provided the wearer looks neat and tidy.
Les Ambassadeurs: Don’t mind couture—cut or evening trouser suits,
but don’t like anything untidy like blue jeans.
Caprice: Quote from the reservations man:
‘l am sure we can have no objections.
women eat here in trousers all the time’

Words by Molly Parkin. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

The eagle-eyed among you may have spotted the Ossie Clark ensemble which won Dress of the Year in 1969. For an item which won such a prestigious award, it’s always amazed me that I haven’t seen more contemporary images of it. I suppose it’s quite ‘out there’, even by late Sixties standards, but thankfully Molly Parkin was always pretty way out there.

If you can make your way through all the text, it’s a pretty impressive and important insight into the attitudes towards women in trousers in late Sixties Britain. It’s easy to forget how scandalous it could be, even in 1969 – a good four years after we first saw Emma Peel in John Bates’s trouser suit designs in The Avengers, for a woman to wear trousers. People obviously did it, you see enough fashion spreads to know that, but the list of swanky hotels and restaurants who still would refuse entry and service to a woman in trousers is quite extraordinary.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, April 1969.

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Left to right: White voile peasant shirt and wide pink, blue and turquoise brocade belt with gilt buckle, both from Thea Porter. Trousers in shell pink silk chiffon with sequins by Gina Fratini / Cyclamen silk shirt with full extravagant sleeves and purple trousers in Warner’s silk damask furnishing fabric, both by Thea Porter/ Brocade belt with gilt buckle by Swordtex from a selection at Mr Fish. / Gipsy bolero in silk brocade and cream organdy trousers, both from Thea Porter. Long orange and yellow scarf wound around waist from Flora Boutique. Chain belt studded with flowers from Browns. More jewelled belts and chains from a selection at Ken Lane.

Inspirational Editorials: Cotton On

1970s, Bernard Neville, british boutique movement, caroline baker, Christian Aujord, edward mann, Electric Fittings, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, janice wainwright, jeff banks, laura ashley, liberty's, nova magazine, Serena Shaffer, Vintage Editorials

Liberty print dress by Jeff Banks

Liberty print dress by Jeff Banks. Hat throughout by Edward Mann. Petticoat throughout by Laura Ashley

Styled by Caroline Baker. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Nova, May 1975

Smock dress and matching pyjama trousers by Serena Shaffer at Electric Fittings.

Smock dress and matching pyjama trousers by Serena Shaffer at Electric Fittings.

Dress by Christian Aujord.

Dress by Christian Aujord.

Top and circle skirt by Janice Wainwright with print by Bernard Neville for Cantoni.

Top and circle skirt by Janice Wainwright with print by Bernard Neville for Cantoni.

Mild Sauce: A Heel of a Height

1970s, caroline baker, Harri Peccinotti, Inspirational Images, mild sauce, nova magazine, yves saint laurent

ysl platforms peccinotti nova january 1974 s

All shoes by Yves Saint Laurent

Skyscraper heels announce a new, more refined shape for shoes in 1974. All the leading shoe designers endorse this feeling, though the heel heights vary. Yves Saint Laurent, that king of trendsetters, picks these – the highest. Thick platforms, the only real fashion story of the 70s so far, are out.

By Caroline Baker. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Nova, January 1974.

Inspirational Editorials: Perfect Pyjamas by Peccinotti

1970s, alice pollock, biba, british boutique movement, caroline baker, chelsea cobbler, edward mann, Electric Fittings, Harri Peccinotti, Herbert Johnson, Inspirational Images, John Craig, katharine hamnett, marie france, nova magazine, ossie clark, quorum, radley, Sujon, Susie Craker, tuttabankem, universal witness, Vintage Editorials, Virginia, yardley, yves saint laurent

Pyjama suit by Sujon.

Pyjama suit by Sujon.

Photographed in Brazil with Yardley, whose Yardley McLaren team took part in the 2nd Grand Prix, 1973

Photographed by Harry Peccinotti. Styled by Caroline Baker.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Nova, May 1973

Drawstring neck top (part of a flared Pajama suit) by Ossie Clark for Radley. Compact mirror from Biba.

Drawstring neck top (part of a flared Pajama suit) by Ossie Clark for Radley. Compact mirror from Biba.

Crêpe de chine printed coat and plain crêpe bags from Electric Fittings. Rib sun top by John Craig. Pique sun hat by Edward Mann. Espadrilles at Ronald Keith.

Crêpe de chine printed coat and plain crêpe bags from Electric Fittings. Rib sun top by John Craig. Pique sun hat by Edward Mann. Espadrilles at Ronald Keith.

Dressing gown from Austin Reed. Silk blouse and baggy pants by Katherine Hamnett for Tuttabankem. Cobweb shoes at Chelsea Cobbler.

Dressing gown from Austin Reed. Silk blouse and baggy pants by Katharine Hamnett for Tuttabankem. Cobweb shoes at Chelsea Cobbler.

Crêpe de chine pyjama suit by Susie Craker. Panama at Paul Craig.

Crêpe de chine pyjama suit by Susie Craker. Panama at Paul Craig.

Sun top sweater by Virginia. Cotton baggy pants by Universal Witness. Hat by Herbert Johnson. Shoes by Yves Saint Laurent.

Sun top sweater by Virginia. Cotton baggy pants by Universal Witness. Hat by Herbert Johnson. Shoes by Yves Saint Laurent.

Crêpe and satin jacket top by Marie France for Quorum. Flared crêpe trousers by Alice Pollock for Quorum.

Crêpe and satin jacket top by Marie France for Quorum. Flared crêpe trousers by Alice Pollock for Quorum.